THE MOON’S LULLABY by Josephine Nobisso
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"While it won't quite replace Susan Bonners's Just in Passing, now out of print, children will delight in traveling with the moon as they too fall under her spell. (Picture book. 2-5)"
As the moon follows its orbit in the sky, it sees the first yawn of the night "with a baby's tiny mouth wrapped around it." Read full book review >
SLEEPY TIME OLIE by William Joyce
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Rolie Polie Olie fans won't care about any of this, however, as Joyce's inventive ideas, rollicking rhymes, and readily recognizable, Rolie-Polie-round illustration style add up to a winning format with proven success. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Rolie Polie Olie is a robot on a roll with sequels, toddler stories in board format, toys, and his own Disney TV show. Read full book review >

DANCING IN MY BONES by Sylvia Andrews
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 2001

"A first choice for all libraries with wiggly kids. (Picture book. 2-6)"
This rollicking, rhyming text by Andrews (Rattlebone Rock, 1997) is part of the Harper Growing Tree line for preschoolers, but the singable, patterned text will also be a hit with first-grade, art, and P.E. teachers and their students. Read full book review >
HAPPY TO YOU! by Caron Lee Cohen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 17, 2001

"Like an unexpected gift, Cohen's bubbly tale will brighten reader's days. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A birthday party sparks a day of joyfulness for a young boy. Read full book review >
DAPPLED APPLES by Jan Carr
FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"Reading it during the summer might make children yearn for the first signs of falling leaves. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The sweet-sour bite of the first fall apple; the crunching sound of the red and orange leaves; and the spooky ghosts of Halloween all come alive in this frisky celebration of autumn. Read full book review >

WHERE DO YOU SLEEP, LITTLE ONE? by Patricia Hooper
POETRY
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"The harmonious art, gentle verses, and comforting yet mysterious view of nature should make this a nursery favorite. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A series of questions and answers couched in rhymed couplets investigates the resting places of a succession of wild and domestic animals, ranging from the chipmunk to the wren, to the pony, goat, and sheep in this gentle bedtime story. Read full book review >
IF YOU HAD A NOSE LIKE AN ELEPHANT’S TRUNK by Marion Dane Bauer
FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"Compare this to Jean Marzollo's and Jerry Pinkney's Pretend You're a Cat (1990) and know that this is a truly missed opportunity. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A young girl explores the fantasy of what she could do if she had the trunk of an elephant, the feet of a fly, the tongue of a snapping turtle, the jaw of a snake, or the spinnerets of a spider. Read full book review >
WIDGET by Lyn Rossiter McFarland
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 5, 2001

"The girls, having learned how, would surely give three barks for Widget. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Widget, a small, stray, furry white dog the size of a West Highland terrier, finds the perfect home with Mrs. Diggs. Read full book review >
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Sept. 4, 2001

"A complete bibliography of Zemach's published work is also appended, making this a first choice for most library collections as well as an excellent addition to any toddler's shelf of nursery rhyme favorites. (Picture book. 2-5)"
This posthumous collection of gloriously illustrated traditional rhymes and songs supplemented by a brief biographical sketch gives Caldecott Medalist Zemach's (Duffy and the Devil, 1973) fans one more chance to savor the delicious watercolors of this highly respected artist. Read full book review >
SLOP GOES THE SOUP by Pamela D. Edwards
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An author's note on the last page cleverly explains the concept of onomatopoeia. (Picture book. 2-7)"
Edwards and Cole (Warthogs Paint, p. 739, etc.) collaborate on their third story about a pair of wacky warthogs who explored counting and colors in the previous stories in the series. Read full book review >
WHERE’S YOUR SMILE, CROCODILE? by Claire Freedman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Young readers will laugh as Kyle makes bird noises, monkey faces, and blows bubbles, adding a little levity to a fairly predictable story. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Kyle wakes up to find that he has misplaced his smile and goes looking for it everywhere, only to realize that it's been there all along. Read full book review >
NOSE TO TOES by Marilyn Baillie
HEALTH
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"While it can't hold a candle to Pretend You're a Cat (1990), it's an imaginative romp that will have children pretending to be all the creatures they see. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Pretending to be an animal can be fun, especially when there are so many to choose from. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >