COUNT DOWN TO CLEAN UP! by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Delightful. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Ten of Wallace's signature bunnies (Paperwhite, 2000, etc.) gather together to neaten up a park. Read full book review >
FIREMAN SMALL by Wong Herbert Yee
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Still, where there's a fireman, there's a reader—and some fire safety tips, too. (Picture book. 2-5)"
He may be pint-sized, and he may be tired after a busy day at the firehouse, but Fireman Small puts on the turbocharger when he smells smoke coming from a vent in this madcap story—the third starring Fireman Small. Read full book review >

WHAT’S THE TIME, GRANDMA WOLF? by Ken Brown
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

Suspense looms in the air as young woodland creatures get closer and closer to big bad Grandma Wolf until it looks like their collective gooses may be cooked. Read full book review >
THE MIGHTIEST by Keiko Kasza
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A new lesson from the mistress of gentle teaching. (Picture book. 2-5)"
No need to strut when you have the stuff, as a little old lady demonstrates to a bunch of would-be kings of the forest. Read full book review >
ANTS IN MY PANTS by Wendy Mould
FICTION
Released: Aug. 17, 2001

"Mould's lovely line-and-wash drawing keep this contest of wills from ever having too sharp an edge. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Talk about imaginary friends—this entire bestiary is conjured to rescue Jacob from a morning of shopping with his mother. Read full book review >

NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 3, 2001

"Overall, though, a good resource for new parents, as well as an introduction to rhyme and rhythm for children. (Nonfiction. 2-6)"
Young children won't be able to resist jumping, clapping, and gesturing to the rhythms and rhymes of this collection. Read full book review >
KISS GOOD NIGHT by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A cute, even sweet, bedtime story, with text and illustrations that work well together, but really, do we need another Goodnight Moon? (Picture book. 2-5)"
"It was a dark and stormy night on Plum Street." Read full book review >
BERNARD GOES TO SCHOOL by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Featuring purple, green, and gold elephants, Catalano's pastels are as soft as the outcome of the story, with Bernard discovering that a friendly face and a new chum go a long way toward taking the dismay out of the new. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The first day of preschool can give even an elephant a case of the shim-shams, as Goodman's little pachyderm learns. Read full book review >
WHOSE SHOES? by Anna Grossnickle Hines
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A merry read-aloud romp. (Picture book. 2-5)"
With exuberant rhymes and clever illustrations, this lively guessing game taps into children's love of shoes and dress-up play. Read full book review >
SOMETHING WONDERFUL by Jenny Nimmo
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"The larger-than-life chickens with their incredibly expressive faces would be enough to entice young readers, but this tale of victory by the ordinary is sure to become a favorite. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Little Hen does not think that she is special in any way until one day she decides that she will do "Something Wonderful." Read full book review >
A CHILD’S GOOD NIGHT PRAYER by Grace Maccarone
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"A gentle reminder for youngsters (and adults, too) to be grateful for the small things. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A sweet ode of gratitude for the simple pleasures in a child's life. Read full book review >
WEBSTER J. DUCK by Martin Waddell
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Simple, sweetly humorous, and just ducky. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Webster J. Duck emerges from his egg a beguiling, web-footed, and fuzzyheaded yellow duckling who has not yet seen his mother. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >