WHO SAYS THAT? by Arnold L. Shapiro
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"An attractive extension of an old idea. (Picture book. 1-4)"
A nicely rhymed text goes beyond the obvious ``Lions roar'' and ``Cows moo'' to include the likes of beavers, parrots, and even, as a refrain, ``girls and boys make a different noise!''- -with examples of their singing, chuckling, talking, etc. captioning Wellington's bold, simple, but effective illustrations. Read full book review >
WILLY AND THE CARDBOARD BOXES by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1991

"Still, the make-believe adventures are nicely realized in Boyd's gentle, stylized art. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The day Dad's new computer arrives, Willy goes to the office with him to spend a happy day playing with the boxes, building everything from a plane to a circus. Read full book review >

COUNTRY ANIMALS by Lucy Cousins
ANIMALS
Released: April 29, 1991

"Outstanding use of form and color, especially suited to its intended audience. (Picture book. 0-4)"
From the talented illustrator of The Little Dog Laughed (1990), an attractive series of six-inch square board books; in addition to Country Animals, there are Farm, Pet, and Garden Animals, each portrayed in a bold, ultra simple childlike style that perfectly captures the creatures' essence. Read full book review >
BLACK CROW, BLACK CROW by Ginger Foglesong Guy
ANIMALS
Released: April 26, 1991

"A happy fusion of unusual idea, melodious words, and charmingly lucid art. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A repetitive, lyrical text (``Black crow, black crow, what do you caw about?/What do you jaw about high in your tree?/I wake up my children, my small sleeping children...'')with just a few words changed in each versetakes a crow and her young through a day, from ``high in the sky'' to ``home in your nest.'' Parker pictures the young crows, who wear simple clothes and have toys, engaged in activities (eating, playing) paralleled by the child who asks the questions. Read full book review >
YELLOW BALL by Molly Bang
by Molly Bang, illustrated by Molly Bang
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 1991

"A wonderfully satisfying book. (Picture book. 0-7)"
Captioned with the simplest of texts—just an occasional word or a phrase—a warm picture-story about what happens to a favorite toy: a beach ball as round and yellow as children imagine the sun to be. Read full book review >

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, WOMBAT! by Kerry Argent
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Just right. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The friends introduced in Wombat and Bandicoot (1990) are back in a charming ``Lift-the-flap Book.'' With the help of some other Australian animals, Bandicoot hides a present and prepares a surprise party; Wombat, meanwhile, less sleepy than he seems, searches unsuccessfully for his gift. Read full book review >
AREN'T YOU LUCKY! by Catherine Anholt
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1991

"Unusually sensible and sympathetic; the deftly drawn illustrations nicely reflect the text's warmth. (Picture book. 2-7)"
The author of When I Was a Baby (1989) takes a realistic look at becoming a big sister, covering familiar ground as the narrator waits for the new arrival, discovers that the baby isn't much fun and gets lots of attention, and finally grows into appreciation of the title's sentiment when she discovers that she really can help with her little brother. Read full book review >
THE BRAVE LITTLE KITTENS by Piotr Wilkon
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Nice, but not essential. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Three kittens explore the world: first their tails, then the house and barn, where they scare a mouse, finally outdoors, where they chase a hen and a rabbit but a dog frightens them—until Mama Cat makes him turn tail. Read full book review >
SHEEP IN A SHOP by Nancy Shaw
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Again, Apple's warmly comic illustrations are the perfect complement to Shaw's exquisitely concise wordplay. (Picture book. 2-7)"
Those totally delightful sheep who appeared earlier in a jeep (1986) and on a ship (1989) turn up in a country store, impecunious but in need of supplies for a birthday picnic. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF BABIES by Jo Foord
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1991

"Large enough to share with a toddler group. (Picture book. 0-4)"
Winsome color photos silhouetted on a clean white ground show babies and toddlers in 11 activities from ``Making Faces'' to ``Sleeping,'' captioned by an uncredited, undistinguished rhyming text that serves to relate language to image. Read full book review >
BUNNY BOX by Lena Anderson
illustrated by Lena Anderson
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1991

"Perceptive, beautifully drawn, perfect to share. (Picture book. 0-4)"
The forthright toddler and cheerful big rabbit of Bunny Party (1989) now joined by a delightful baby bunny. Read full book review >
LITTLE BIG MOUSE by Nurit Karlin
ANIMALS
Released: March 29, 1991

"This modest but deftly fashioned charmer also features a witty text, as deceptively simple as its illustrations.~(Picture book. 2-6)"
With a sure hand and a vigorous cartoon style, Karlin pictures a mouse who sets out to discover how he can become big, and instead finds out that everyone's size is relative. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >