SWEEP UP THE SUN by Helen Frost
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"All-around gorgeous; Frost and Lieder again showcase the splendor of nature through the happy marriage of literal and figurative images. (Picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
A picture-book poem calling for adventure that's—thankfully—for the birds. Read full book review >
PIZZA by Frank Asch
by Frank Asch, illustrated by Frank Asch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A sweetly simple story that hinges on not just Baby Bear's appetite, but his imaginative flights of fancy, too. (Picture book. 2-5)"
It may be hard for many American readers to believe, but Baby Bear has never had pizza before in this new offering from the beloved creator of Moonbear. Read full book review >

SMALL ELEPHANT'S BATHTIME by Tatyana Feeney
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Charming, brilliant in color and execution, and funny to even the most indignant foot stompers, NO! screamers and bathtime boycotters. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Small Elephant loves water—most of the time. Read full book review >
FLY! by Karl Newsom Edwards
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Toddlers will cheer this tale of exploration while simultaneously jumping to their feet to try every action, right along with Fly. (appended bug facts) (Picture book. 2-5)"
A young fly struggles to find his special talent. Read full book review >
UNDER THE SEA by Mike Goldsmith
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 8, 2015

"Well-intentioned but confusing, these British imports should have stayed in England. (Board book. 2-4)"
A busy board book presents sea creatures to identify. Read full book review >

IF MY MOM WERE A BIRD by Jedda Robaard
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Sweet enough but slight and monocultural. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A passel of smiling children imagines what kinds of birds their moms would be. Read full book review >
TOYS by David Stewart
by David Stewart, illustrated by David Stewart
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"This and the other titles in the Black & White series may well become favorites for tots to chew on until they graduate to Donald Crews' graphically striking classics, such as Truck and Freight Train. (Board book. 3-18 mos.)"
There is much to talk about with baby in this sturdy, wordless, black-and-white board book. Read full book review >
RHYMOCEROS by Janik Coat
Kirkus Star
by Janik Coat, illustrated by Janik Coat
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Charmingly simple. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
A rhyming rhinoceros composes a most amusing doggerel. Read full book review >
LULLABY AND KISSES SWEET by Lee Bennett Hopkins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Young board-book listeners will be happy when their caregivers take Hopkins' advice: 'Read to me—then— / read to me / read to me / again and again.' (Board book. 1-3)"
In his first collection for toddlers, master anthologist Hopkins has organized 30 poems by over 20 poets in five sections: "Family," "Food," "Firsts," "Play," and "Bedtime." Read full book review >
BUNNIES by Laura Ellen Anderson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Cheery and colorful, though not extraordinary. (Board book. 1-3)"
A cluster of bunnies plays the day away. Read full book review >
BOATS GO by Steve Light
Kirkus Star
by Steve Light, illustrated by Steve Light
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"The real challenge will be keeping it out of the bathtub. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
Eight boats sail across the elongated double-page spreads, rendered in primary-color watercolors and accompanied by an appropriate sound. Read full book review >
OLIVE MARSHMALLOW by Katie Saunders
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Well-done new sibling books are always welcome, and this one is as cozy as being swaddled. (Picture book.2-4)"
Another new-baby story joins the cribfull of titles told from the big-sibling angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >