LOOK! by Jeff Mack
by Jeff Mack, illustrated by Jeff Mack
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Look, indeed! An energetic invitation to the joys of books. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Even an ape knows books can be better than TV. Read full book review >
SNIFF! SNIFF! by Ryan Sias
by Ryan Sias, illustrated by Ryan Sias
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Young readers will sniff their ways to this one again and again. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A little brown puppy follows his nose and has an aroma-filled day. Read full book review >

VEGETABLES IN UNDERWEAR by Jared Chapman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Those who are making the transition from diapers are sure to laugh, though it doesn't really stand out from the other books in the underwear drawer. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A survey of underwear and opposites is leavened (as if talk of underwear needs to be made funnier) by anthropomorphized veggies. Read full book review >
BIRD AND BEAR by Ann James
by Ann James, illustrated by Ann James
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Ultimately, Bird and Bear are charming characters to look at, but their story needs more…story. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A slice-of-life story describes the friendship enjoyed by the eponymous Bird and Bear. Read full book review >
HOW TO PEE by Todd Spector
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"The lesson is clear: Pee with flair. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Sure, potty training is important, but how many books emphasize how to urinate with style? Read full book review >

UH-OH! by Shutta Crum
by Shutta Crum, illustrated by Patrice Barton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"Though there are as many 'Uh-oh' books out there as there are fishies in the sea, this petite charmer is a fine addition to the beach-time shelf. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Aside from the ubiquitous "NO!" few toddler phrases are more beloved than the expansively useful "Uh-oh!" Read full book review >
MY BIKE by Byron Barton
Kirkus Star
by Byron Barton, illustrated by Byron Barton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"A natural for group storytimes, though plenty of single tots will enjoy seeing Tom's seemingly quotidian world suddenly transformed. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Barton (My Car, 2001; My Bus, 2014) wheels out another conveyance—but sends this one rolling past a set of escalating surprises to a high-wire climax. Read full book review >
LITTLE SLEEPYHEAD by Elizabeth McPike
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"In the crowded field of bedtime books, this is a very sweet nighttime send-off for the littlest yawners. (Picture book. 9 mos.-2)"
After a full day, the very young appreciate a hushed yet lively bedtime book to prepare for the evening ritual. Read full book review >
BABY LOVE by Angela DiTerlizzi
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"A joyful, warm and lovely bedtime story. (Picture book. 6 mos.-2)"
A beloved baby is the center of the universe for adoring parents. Read full book review >
BUNNY ROO, I LOVE YOU by Melissa Marr
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 14, 2015

"A lovely package, this quiet title will be best as a gift book for new moms eager to read aloud to the newest members of their families. (Picture book. 1-3)"
A mother's observations of her new baby lead to a series of sweet comparisons to various animals. Read full book review >
ROBOT SMASH! by Stephen W. Martin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2015

"With demand for STEM-themed books for toddlers at an all-time high, this will undoubtedly prove popular with both ends of its intended audience. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The title sums it up: This mechanical man is a total wrecking machine. Read full book review >
VINCENT AND THE NIGHT by Adele Enersen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 21, 2015

"Offbeat enough to add to an already-groaning collection of bedtime books. (Picture book. 1-6)"
Photogenic Vincent is a baby who isn't ready for bedtime, so he uses the pen-and-ink blackness of nighttime to create a fantasy world for himself and readers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >