THE BOY & THE BOOK by David Michael Slater
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Presented as a grand adventure, the moment when a child first learns to read is powerfully rendered in this well-made story. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A nearly wordless picture book presents the "I can read" moment. Read full book review >
BUTTERFLY COUNTING by Jerry Pallotta
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"This welcome reworking of the author's earlier Butterfly Counting Book (1998) and board book ButterflyColors and Counting (2013) offers learning opportunities galore. (Informational picture book. 4-7)"
An unusual butterfly book introduces facts about the insects, portrays 24 different species, gives the word for "butterfly" in 27 languages other than English, and counts up from zero to 25. Read full book review >

JOHN MUIR WRESTLES A WATERFALL by Julie Danneberg
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A welcome addition to the modern collection of John Muir's adventures. (Internet resources, bibliography, citations) (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
A noted naturalist nearly loses his life exploring a waterfall. Read full book review >
OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY by Elizabeth Hammill
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Never mind far away, keep this collection close by. (Poetry. 1-8)"
A sumptuous multicultural collection of nursery rhymes includes art by over 70 illustrators. Read full book review >
MARILYN'S MONSTER by Michelle Knudsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A surprising spin on monsters with nicely effective artwork—and heart. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Marilyn waits and waits for her monster to find her, the way all her friends' monster companions found them, until she finally gives up and goes looking for him. Read full book review >

SWEEP UP THE SUN by Helen Frost
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"All-around gorgeous; Frost and Lieder again showcase the splendor of nature through the happy marriage of literal and figurative images. (Picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
A picture-book poem calling for adventure that's—thankfully—for the birds. Read full book review >
HIPPOS ARE HUGE! by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"The combined effect is a playful, clever introduction to the hippo that works for read-alouds or independent study. (index, author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Hippos are huge, graceful and dangerous, as depicted in this colorful, informative book for the youngest naturalists. Read full book review >
PIZZA by Frank Asch
by Frank Asch, illustrated by Frank Asch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A sweetly simple story that hinges on not just Baby Bear's appetite, but his imaginative flights of fancy, too. (Picture book. 2-5)"
It may be hard for many American readers to believe, but Baby Bear has never had pizza before in this new offering from the beloved creator of Moonbear. Read full book review >
SMALL ELEPHANT'S BATHTIME by Tatyana Feeney
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Charming, brilliant in color and execution, and funny to even the most indignant foot stompers, NO! screamers and bathtime boycotters. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Small Elephant loves water—most of the time. Read full book review >
FLY! by Karl Newsom Edwards
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Toddlers will cheer this tale of exploration while simultaneously jumping to their feet to try every action, right along with Fly. (appended bug facts) (Picture book. 2-5)"
A young fly struggles to find his special talent. Read full book review >
ROOM FOR BEAR by Ciara Gavin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Just ducky. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Creating a blended family demands a new choice in housing in Gavin's picture-book debut. Read full book review >
LITTLE BIRD TAKES A BATH by Marisabina Russo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Simple and understated—and all the more enjoyable for it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In the decidedly urban setting that Little Bird calls his own, he wakes up with a song—he always starts his day with a song—and looks for a puddle for a bath after the unpleasantness of the nighttime rain. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >