MONSTER NEEDS TO GO TO SCHOOL by Paul Czajak
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"A rhyming bullying tale with some worthwhile lessons. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Monster and his little boy tackle Monster's first day of school. Read full book review >
GO, OTTO, GO! by David Milgrim
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Welcome back, Otto. Glad you're here to stay. (Early reader. 4-8)"
Almost a decade and a half after crash-landing on Earth in See Otto (2002), Milgrim's lovable robot is back and thinking about returning home.Read full book review >

HENSEL AND GRETEL by Corey Rosen Schwartz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Cheep thrills indeed! (Picture book. 5-8)"
The wolf from the first two of Schwartz and Santat's ninja fairy tales (The Three Ninja Pigs, 2012, etc.) has finally learned to live peacefully—but the fox has yet to learn that lesson. Read full book review >
BLUE BOAT by Kersten Hamilton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Sinks. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A tugboat rescues a sailing family in distress in this picture book. Read full book review >
HELLO, MY NAME IS OCTICORN by Kevin Diller
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"There may be plenty more adventures for Octicorn; here's hoping that they'll be more amusing than awkward—unlike this introduction. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The offspring of an octopus mom and a unicorn dad, Octicorn really needs a friend. Read full book review >

A DARK, DARK CAVE by Eric Hoffman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Readers young and old will find much to appreciate in this celebration of the imagination. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Who is down there in the dark, dark cave? Read full book review >
HOW TO EAT AN AIRPLANE by Peter Pearson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"This series opener is a successful combination of etiquette book and airplane cookery: who'd have thunk it? (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
A man ate an airplane. This is true. Though this is not his story, Pearson uses it to ground a surprisingly informative book about the technology (and etiquette). Read full book review >
PUDDLES!!! by Kevan Atteberry
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Filled with frenzied exclamations perfect for shouting (though the dynamics do not vary much—it is full force most of the time), the book will delight at storytimes. (Picture book. 3-6)"
That lovable, gleeful monster from Bunnies!!! (2015) is excited once again.Read full book review >
HARE AND TORTOISE by Alison Murray
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Clever and appealing. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A modern retelling of the Aesop classic. (Spoiler alert: slow but steady again wins the race.) Read full book review >
THE TWO TIMS by David Elliott
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"An oft-told learning journey that all friend groups must navigate; this simple telling may resonate in ways others do not. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Two kids, each named Tim, are best friends. Read full book review >
WHERE DO STEAM TRAINS SLEEP AT NIGHT? by Brianna Caplan Sayres
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Thanks to the popularity of Thomas the Tank Engine, hopeful engineers will want to be able to identify the many different types of trains, and their out-of-the-know adults will appreciate this inclusive primer. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Sayres and Slade move naturally from their truck lullaby, Where Do Diggers Sleep at Night? (2012), to this nighttime serenade to all things train. Read full book review >
LUCY LADYBUG by Sharon King-Chai
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"Sweet. (Picture book. 3-5)"
How can a ladybug who's just a little different fit in? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >