ELLIOT FRY'S GOOD-BYE by Larry Dane Brimner
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Fernandes's happy-go-lucky illustrations are right in the spirit of the wholesome story. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Elliot decides to leave home rather than clean up his room to make space for his visiting uncle, his parents simply remind him to take his sweater and not to cross the street, thus limiting his trip to circling his own pleasant suburban block. Read full book review >
HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK by Robin Muller
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"There are too many miscellaneous details, the verse isn't especially clever, and the absurdities are neither funny enough nor intriguing enough to be worth puzzling over. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Despite a pretitle vignette of a landscape draped in droopy clocks, the surreal nonsense here is more dada than Dali. Read full book review >

WHEN I AM EIGHT by Joan Lowery Nixon
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A likable addition. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A self-assured little boy details the grand things he'll do when he's big like his brother: his wheelies will break records; he'll be a champion ballplayer who can retort, ``Who cares?'' when he's told he's too little to play; and (his imagination soars) he'll have a video game with real monsters and a birthday party with a circus, including an elephant. Read full book review >
THE FLOWER OF SHEBA by Doris Orgel
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Bank Street Ready-to-Read book. (Easy reader. 5-8)"
The great queen visits King Solomon to ``prove him with hard questions,'' as the Bible says. Read full book review >
MAX FOUND TWO STICKS by Brian Pinkney
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A perfect marriage of idea and art. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sitting on his stoop near the end of a tidy block of row houses, Max seizes on a couple of sticks that blow from a tree and begins tapping: on his own thighs; on the bottom of Grandpa's window-washing bucket; on a hatbox his mother brings home, bottles, a garbage can. Read full book review >

I WANTED TO KNOW ALL ABOUT GOD by Virginia L. Kroll
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"An attractive discussion opener. (Picture book. 3-7)"
``I wondered if God is strong, and the ocean roared in my ears.'' ``I wondered if God is caring, and the new boy shared his crayons with me.'' Through a dozen such observations, Kroll builds the idea that God's attributes can be discovered in many ways in ``His Creation,'' in the natural world and in people's generosity and love—a kindly, all-embracing, nonsectarian view of a deity whose likes include children of different colors, as shown in Jenkins's lush, sun-dappled paintings of glowing kids enjoying a snowy day, admiring a spider's web, or wrapped in Grandma's embrace. Read full book review >
THE DUMB BUNNIES by Sue Denim
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"But let's not elevate this by calling it wit—at best, it's harmless silliness. (Picture book. 5-7)"
This labored effort is obviously meant to be funny, but it's more in the goofball style of Beavis and Butthead than an entry in the ranks of fractured fairy tales by such masters as Scieszka/Lane or James Marshall. Read full book review >
MARIGOLD AND GRANDMA ON THE TOWN by Stephanie Calmenson
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"An endearing introduction to someone who could become a real favorite. (Easy reader. 4-8)"
In the spirit of Minarik's Little Bear, four easily read chapters by the author of The Principal's New Clothes (1989). Read full book review >
BABY WHALES DRINK MILK by Barbara Juster Esbensen
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"An excellent addition to the Let's-Read-and- Find-Out series. (Nonfiction/picture book. 3-8)"
The title epitomizes Esbensen's creative presentation of an important concept: how whales differ from the fish they seem to resemble and share characteristics with other mammals. Read full book review >
LIGHTHOUSE CHILDREN by Syd Hoff
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"Cheery, but sloppy. (Easy reader. 5-8)"
What a cozy, old-fashioned world this popular author creates—and how improbable, whether it's the precarious placement of old lighthouse-keeper Sam's feet on a winding stair or the story's pat conclusion. Read full book review >
BE A FRIEND TO TREES by Patricia Lauber
NATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"Still, the lucid text will make this useful; and creative teachers could make a project of comparing real trees with the art. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
``Trees are nice [and] also useful,'' begins the noted science writer, summing up the concepts introduced here. Read full book review >
LITTLE RABBIT GOES TO SLEEP by Tony Johnston
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 30, 1994

"A charming bedtime book that should be with us for years to come. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The little rabbit tries to go to sleep—he counts mosquitoes (one) and the feet of mice scurrying in the rafters (it can't be done: too many) and tries to ignore the scary dark; but finally he creeps down to the porch, where Grandpa's rocking chair is creaking. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >