BACKSTAGE WITH CLAWDIO by Harriet Berg Schwartz
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Glossary. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Schwartz debuts with a character created to dramatize the theatrical world in which she grew up. ``Clawdio,'' a cat who lives in a theater, confides theatrical practice and lore while describing his own activities—helping the doorman fend off autograph hunters, comforting the young lead in Peter Pan when she gets stage fright on opening night, raising ire when he gets underfoot. Read full book review >
ANDREW McANDREW by Bernard MacLaverty
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1993

"An acceptable additional purchase, useful for precocious readers. (Fiction. 4- 8)"
Eight stories about a four-year-old and his grandad, all with essentially the same plot: despite Grandad's warnings, the minute he's out of sight Andrew tries to help, but his meddling- -whether it's tuning Grandad's fiddle, switching the new kitchen faucets, or touching a clock's pendulum—always results in a minor disaster; and Grandad always seems ``very angry'' when he finds out, but then easily repairs the damage. Read full book review >

SCREEN OF FROGS by Sheila Hamanaka
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A fine contribution, excellent for sharing aloud. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
An old Japanese tale that addresses a number of contemporary concerns. Read full book review >
SIR WHONG AND THE GOLDEN PIG by Oki S. Han
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A mixed effort, but the story itself, with its trickster appropriately tricked himself, is appealing. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Known for his wisdom as well as his wealth and generosity, Sir Whong would not normally loan such a large sum as 1,000 nyung to a stranger, but ``Mr. Oh'' cons him with a sad story and what looks like good security: a golden ``family treasure.'' Months later, when Whong notices that his ``gold'' pig is beginning to tarnish, he raises a hullabaloo: the precious pig is missing, he cries, and when Mr. Oh arrives, hoping to extract still more money in recompense, Whong gives him the pig in return for the original sum. Read full book review >
THE FIREBIRD by Selina Hastings
adapted by Selina Hastings, illustrated by Reg Cartwright
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A lively addition to folklore collections. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
This is not the story made familiar by the ballet, but a related tale in which the firebird figures mostly at the outset, when one of its feathers is found by a huntsman who presents it to his king—a tyrant whose response is to send the poor fellow off to fetch the bird, which he is able to do with the advice of his admirable talking horse. Read full book review >

TORTOISE SOLVES A PROBLEM by Avner Katz
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"The author's cartoon-style illustrations are unassuming, but appropriately satirical and expressive. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a whimsical ``why'' story by an Israeli author, published in Hebrew in 1979, early tortoises (not yet equipped with shells) come up with a unique solution to their homelessness. Read full book review >
GRANDMA by Alison Dexter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"A fresh look at a perennial theme. (Picture book. 3-7)"
From a new British illustrator, a cheery intergenerational good time. Read full book review >
OVER BACK by Beverly Major
FICTION
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"A nourishing picture of one child's pleasure in the natural world. (Picture book. 5-10)"
A young African-American shares her joy in the world out beyond her family's barn, where there are blueberries to eat, walls to climb, and sweet-smelling arbutus so fragrant that ``You have to smell the flowers and smell them again, the way you have to keep looking at a rainbow until it's gone.'' A creek for wading, frogs' eggs, and a ``slow and lumpy, bumpy'' cow to ride home all add up to a lyrical idyll of country life. Read full book review >
MARUSHKA'S EGG by Elsa Okon Rael
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Feb. 26, 1993

"Entertaining and attractive. (Young reader/Picture book. 5-9)"
Sent to buy an egg for her mother's Easter bread, Marushka is entranced by the beautifully decorated one displayed by a woman in the market. Read full book review >
TODAY IS MONDAY by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"Music included, but the song isn't sourced. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Carle's illustrations for this catchy, lighthearted cumulative song ("...today is Tuesday, Tuesday spaghetti, Monday string beans, All you hungry children Come and eat it up") originally appeared in 1977 as a frieze; they are even more welcome in this attractive book showing a porcupine eating the beans, an elephant slopping up Wednesday's "ZOOOOP," a cat snitching Thursday's roast beef, and so on. Read full book review >
TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >
LILI AT BALLET by Rachel Isadora
FICTION
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"There's little mention here of discipline or hard work; still, an attractive and informative first look. (Picture book. 4-9)"
With a minimal explanatory text, a realistic depiction of a serious young ballet student and her class. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >