HANDS by Lois Ehlert
by Lois Ehlert, illustrated by Lois Ehlert
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"It's a work that looks simple, but encompasses at least as many grand notions as Ehlert's first book, Growing Vegetable Soup (1987). (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a book that resembles work gloves, an unnamed child speaks of hands: the hands of parents, and the child's own. Read full book review >
THE BEGGAR'S MAGIC by Margaret Chang
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"The book is as satisfying as unselfishness rewarded fully and meanness punished neatly. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
The Changs (The Cricket Warrior, 1994, etc.) retell an ancient Chinese tale about selfishness and sharing, set to luminous illustrations by Johnson. Read full book review >

WHAT THE SUN SEES, WHAT THE MOON SEES by Nancy Tafuri
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"From beautiful mixed-media artwork is fashioned an elegantly simple graphic demonstration of the neverending cycle of day and night. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A double-ended book showing scenes from farm, woodland, city, and school, first by day and then, by turning the book over and beginning again from the "back," at night. Read full book review >
THE MAGIC SEWING MACHINE by Sunny Warner
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A story-hour special. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Two orphans, brother and sister, triumph over their miserable lot in life with the help of a magic sewing machine. Read full book review >
HIDING by Tudor Humphries
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A wise, gently humorous book, perfect for all those who have ever attempted to run away and have been only too glad to have their plans thwarted. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The preschooler who narrates this story finds that whenever the situation appears out of control, there's only one answer: to hidebehind the couch, in the hidey hole under the stairs, under the dinner table, the bed, the bedcovers. Read full book review >

PARTS by Tedd Arnold
by Tedd Arnold, illustrated by Tedd Arnold
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Stupid, silly, and base, in equal measure, this has watercolor illustrations that are textured with colored-pencil curlicues in such a way that they look hairy—like the tangles that clog a shower drain. (Book-of-the- Month Club) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Arnold (The Simple People, 1992, etc.) cashes in by grossing out the picture-book set in this story in rhyme, which kids with rough-and-ready sensibilities will relish and fastidious adults will shun, for the same reasons. Read full book review >
JUMPETY-BUMPETY HOP by Kay Chorao
POETRY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"All the poems have been illustrated with Chorao's cuddly art, a style that works well with simpler pieces but is less suitable when paired with more sophisticated works. (Picture book/poetry. 3-7)"
This enjoyably eclectic gathering of poems sports a good range of styles, tempos, and moods. Read full book review >
DAY OF THE DEAD by Tony Johnston
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A warm, fictional introduction for an audience younger than that for the photo-essays by Kathryn Lasky (Days of the Dead, 1994) and Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith (Day of the Dead, 1994, not reviewed). (Picture book. 4-7)"
The team that collaborated so gracefully on Diego (1991) returns with another little book showing how a Mexican family celebrates el d°a de los muertos, the holiday commemorating the dead. Read full book review >
CAT TRICKS by Keith Baker
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"In all, an illustrator's tour de force, and a great stimulus to a child's visual imagination. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Fans of Baker's Hide and Snake (1991) will be happy to encounter this new book of catchy verse and tricky pictures in an intense purple, green, blue, and gold palette, used to depict cats, shoes, hats, clocks, patterned fabrics, and extravagant textures of all kinds. Read full book review >
FLANNEL KISSES by Linda Crotta Brennan
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Alternately frolicsome and homey, this is pleasant, but without the simple wonder found in Ezra Jack Keats's wintry classic, The Snowy Day (1963), as Peter drags a stick through the snow. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A rhyming poem for the very young contrasts the warmth of indoor meals and clothing with the snowy arena of outdoor play. Read full book review >
BRENDA AND EDWARD by Maryann Kovalski
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Once readers give themselves over to the hybrid world in which the dogs dwellthey are clearly canine, with doggy features and abilities, but in all other ways act humanthey will relish this two-hankie telling and the tidy illustrations of love lost and found. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Kovalski (Pizza for Breakfast, 1991, etc.) introduces two lovable dogs that live happily together behind a French restaurant. Read full book review >
POPCORN AT THE PALACE by Emily Arnold McCully
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"What readers will remember is the pioneer spirit behind this appealing tale and a spunky girlreal or notat its center. (Picture book. 5-8)"
McCully (Starring Mirette and Bellini, p. 559) bases this tale on a piece of history from her own hometown, Galesburg, Illinois, and one of its innovative founders, Olmsted Ferris, who experimented with unusual crops. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >