MY FIRST MUSIC BOOK by Helen Drew
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Good ideas for teachers, scout leaders, camp counselors, and for home. (Nonfiction. 5-11)"
This large, attractive British import should have been titled My First Book of Musical Instruments: bright color photos and step- by-step instructions show how to make and play a dozen types (heavy on percussion), from simple rattles to a fairly elaborate facsimile of a banjo. Read full book review >
MY WICKED STEPMOTHER by Norman Leach
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 31, 1993

"Pair this with Rosenberg's Monster Mama (p. 153) for a provocative contrast. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Though his new stepmother, Annie, is unfailingly kind and tries to share Tom's imaginative games when friends Jack and David put him down (``Superman's boring! Read full book review >

STORM by W. Nikola-Lisa
by W. Nikola-Lisa, illustrated by Michael Hays
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1993

"Both the sun and a red barn move in surprising ways here; still, an effective contribution to the genre. (Picture book. 3-7)"
An evocative mood-piece, re-creating the sensory impressions of a summer storm in rolling heartland America. Read full book review >
OUTSIDE AND INSIDE TREES by Sandra Markle
NATURE
Released: March 31, 1993

A prolific science writer takes on bark, roots, pollen, and the other parts of trees, all depicted in striking color photos; the color-enhanced, carefully labeled microscopic photos (showing the inside of a seed, stoma, sapwood tubes, and more) are especially fascinating. Read full book review >
BENJAMIN BIGFOOT by Mary Serfozo
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1993

"Serfozo's gracefully honed text, perfectly in tune with a small child's concerns, is nicely served by Smith's realistic, humorous illustrations—which slyly reveal that Benjamin has been a little lonely at home. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Like many a preschooler, Benjamin has a favorite thing: Dad's old shoes, which he wears constantly, through dust or mud, dry leaves or snow. Read full book review >

SQUIRREL PARK by Lisa Campbell Ernst
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1993

"A lively entry for the picture book hour. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Like his buildings, Stuart's architect dad is ``big, straight, and powerful.'' When he gives Stuart a first job, designing a park, he also gives him rulers and a T-square to make sure all paths are straight. Read full book review >
PINKY AND REX AND THE NEW BABY by James Howe
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 31, 1993

"With lively, believable dialogue, realistic situations that gently test the likable pair's mettle, and Sweet's appealing art on every easily read spread: another strong entry in a popular series. (Fiction/Young reader. 5-8)"
Perhaps because Rex is a little older than the expectant siblings found in many picture books, her experience is the reverse of theirs: her worries about being supplanted come before her parents bring home new adopted brother Matthew. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE PAINTER OF SABANA GRANDE by Patricia Maloney Markun
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1993

"Pleasant and unusual. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Fernando's teacher has told him how to make paint with natural materials—charcoal, berries, clay—so that he can continue with his art during the vacation; the one thing lacking is paper. Read full book review >
POTS AND PANS by Anne Rockwell
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1993

"Simple, refreshing, and an inspiration to parents who may not have realized what entertaining—and educational—resources they have in their kitchens. (Picture book. 1-4)"
How nice to have it recognized that colanders and wooden spoons can be not only works of art but also the best of toys. Read full book review >
BRAVE JACK by Dave Saunders
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1993

"The simple plot, with language nicely varied in the repeated warnings, makes for a novel and suspenseful way to review some barnyard friends—who are especially welcome as depicted in the splendidly evocative, beautifully crafted art. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Jack, the lithe brown wild rabbit who hops alertly through Dave Saunders's handsome paintings, has big plans for a feast in the cabbage patch. Read full book review >
MUWIN AND THE MAGIC HARE by Susan Hand--Adapt. Shetterly
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1993

"Still, the bear's adventures are mildly intriguing; the Shetterleys show respect for their sources in a note; and the vibrant acrylics, enhanced with dramatic shadows, nicely evoke the Maine landscape (the animals are especially appealing). (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
Two simply retold Passamaquoddy tales (``The Rough-face Girl'' plus one about a conceited grouse whose round canoe spins into a whirlpool) are set in an elaborate longer tale about a bear who's about to hibernate when he's lured away by the Great Magic Hare, Mahtoqehs—who leads the still-hungry Muwin to a campfire where a hunter offers him ``stew of snowshoe hare'' and tells him a story; next morning, all has vanished. Read full book review >
NELLIE'S KNOT by Ken Brown
by Ken Brown, illustrated by Ken Brown
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1993

"With a simple text and appealing watercolors of the animals in their home at the edge of an African jungle, a likable introduction to this British illustrator. (Picture book. 1-6)"
A one-idea story with a funny premise: Nellie, a little elephant, has tied a knot in her trunk as an aide-mÇmoire, but can't remember why. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >