THE YEAR OF NO MORE CORN by Helen Ketteman
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A lively, likable tall tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Beanie complains that ``Dad says I'm too young to help'' plant corn, Grampa allows that ``that's funny, because he said I'm too old''—and wisely seizes the opportunity to describe the spring of 1928, when his successive plantings were destroyed by a string of disasters rivaling the plagues of Egypt: floods, wind, crows, a sun so hot the hens laid hard-boiled eggs and the corn popped. Read full book review >
THE BEAR THAT HEARD CRYING by Natalie Kinsey-Warnock
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Rand's settings—especially the darkening forest, in luminous shades of gray-green, and the soft, furry bear—are beautifully painted; his humans are a bit trite and over-pretty, but that's a small flaw in an unusually appealing slice of Americana. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In 1783, three-year-old Sarah Whitcher (the authors' great- great-great-great-great-aunt) wandered into the woods near Warren, New Hampshire; four days later, she was found by a man who had dreamed that she under a particular pine, guarded by a bear. Read full book review >

AND SO THEY BUILD by Bert Kitchen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

An artist known for his elegant sense of design and meticulous paintings (Animal Alphabet, 1984, ALA Notable) depicts 12 animal-built structures: Australia's mallee fowl make self- warming nests of composting vegetable matter covered with sand, controlling the temperature until their eggs hatch; Africa's Cubeterme termites build columns of soil, riddled with chambers for different functions and topped with an umbrella-like cap to ``divert torrential rain''; a pregnant harvest mouse weaves a nest of still-rooted grasses, so that the nest continues to rise to greater safety. Read full book review >
ARNOLD ALWAYS ANSWERS by Deborah Kotter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Attractive, thoughtfully crafted. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Taking an unusually creative approach to dramatizing antonyms, Kotter's debut book presents a preschooler's day through queries posed by his mother, from the first time she asks, ``Awake or asleep?'' and he hops out of bed until the second time, when he's too drowsy to hear her last whisper. Read full book review >
A CARP FOR KIMIKO by Virginia Kroll
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An upbeat but still bracing look at a culture in which children learn to accept tradition—and, like all children, to bargain within the constraints they're given. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Kimiko yearns for a carp-shaped kite to fly on Children's Day, like the one little brother Yukio has, but it's not the Japanese tradition: kites are for boys. Read full book review >

THE ACCIDENTAL ZUCCHINI by Max Grover
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Attractive, if not essential. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Grover's first is ``An Unexpected Alphabet,'' with pairings (``Fork fence''; ``Vegetable volcano'') that occasion amusing surreal paintings in crayon-bright colors. Read full book review >
PENGUINS AT HOME by Bruce McMillan
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Map; brief bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 5-12)"
A close look at the Southern Gentoos, largest of the penguins on the Antarctic peninsula. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A dramatically unusual book. (Picture book. 5-10)"
An Aboriginal Australian draws on his ethnic traditions for both story and illustrative style. Read full book review >
I WANT TO BE by Thylias Moss
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Exhilarating, verbally and visually: the very essence of youthful energy and summertime freedom. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The untrammeled exuberance of a free-spirited youngster, eager to explore everything, sings through a poetic story. Read full book review >
COUNTING CRANES by Mary Beth Owens
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A lovely, eloquent book. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Owens (A Caribou Alphabet, 1989, ALA Notable) brings her concern for wildlife and elegant sense of design to a counting book featuring a species—the whooping crane—once reduced to a population of 15, the number shown on the last spread here (there are are now 131 cranes ``living in the Canadian-American flock''). Read full book review >
HOW GIRAFFE GOT SUCH A LONG NECK...AND WHY RHINO IS SO GRUMPY by Michael Rosen
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Briskly, simply told and illustrated with humor and an outstanding use of graphic design, an entertaining tale that makes a natural lead-in to Kipling's explanation for the rhinoceros's notorious bad temper. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
The publisher notes that ``Versions of this story are told in many parts of East Africa,'' crediting a printed source and adding that ``the artist has based his depiction of Man on early Masai tribesmen''—an auspicious introduction to another handsome collaboration by the creators of How the Animals Got Their Colors (1992). Read full book review >
THE HAPPY HOCKY FAMILY by Lane Smith
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Fun for all. (Easy reader. 3-8)"
Seventeen extremely short stories to delight the pre-primer crowd and their younger sibs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >