GRANDMOTHER'S DREAMCATCHER by Becky Ray McCain
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Directions for making a dreamcatcher round out this satisfying offering. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Kimmy is to spend a week with her Chippewa grandmother while her parents look for a new home in Chicago. Read full book review >
WHO'S BEEN SLEEPING IN MY PORRIDGE? by Colin McNaughton
POETRY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Rock-and-roller's quiff!' (index) (Poetry. 5-10)"
This collection of sophomoric verse from McNaughton (Preston's Goal, p. 897, etc.) isn't so much wicked as mean—"He's such a sweet pup,/I could eat him right up—/We'll have him tonight in the stew!"—and not so much playground-subversive as just plain dumb: "If I was a bird,/My wings I would spread,/I'd swoop over you/And plop on your head!" Read full book review >

NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Despite the devastating ending, this touching tale of quiet bravery has universal appeal. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The phenomenal but often unnoticed heroism of many recent immigrants' journeys to freedom is recorded in this remarkable tale of a young Korean girl's escape. Read full book review >
CENDRILLON by Robert D. San Souci
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Pinkney's scratchboard illustrations give the comic proportions a tangibility that leaps off the page—the laundry snaps, the coachmen jostle with the movement of the carriage, and the stepdaughter's toes, are, indeed, sausages. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
San Souci's retelling of the Cinderella story in a Martinique mode has music to it that cannot be denied. Read full book review >
THE ROMAN TWINS by Roy Gerrard
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Told in rhyming verse, the genial book is inhabited by Gerrard's characteristically dwarfish people, living among extraordinarily detailed buildings. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Gerrard (Wagons West!, 1996, etc.) takes on Goths and the Roman Empire with a uniquely upended story of twins. Read full book review >

FIRE TRUCK by Peter Sís
by Peter Sís, illustrated by Peter Sís
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The spartan application of color makes the intensely red fire trucks leap off the pages, perfect for point-and-name games and for inspiring similar flights of the imagination. (Picture book. 4-7)"
S°s (Starry Messenger, 1996, etc.) celebrates a universally cherished childhood favorite—the fire truck—in simple, clean lines and smooth planes of color. Read full book review >
LOOK-ALIKES by Joan Steiner
by Joan Steiner, illustrated by Joan Steiner, photographed by Thomas Lindley
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A guide in the back details the number of look-alike items (up to 207 in each photographed scene), making this a fun addition to any shelf, and especially where the I Spy books are in demand. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Steiner transports readers to a fantastic city constructed out of everyday household items in this colorful and engaging picture book. Read full book review >
A WORLD OF WORDS by Tobi Tobias
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Book combines quotes about books by Kate Guess, Thomas Jefferson, and M.B. Goffstein with an illustration of a small girl in a bathtub boat; Opal Whiteley's and Seamus Heaney's quotations for Shadow face a rabbit father and child who are making people shadows on the wall. (Picture book. 5-10)"
With great imagination and finesse, Tobias and Malone rework the well-burnished components of an alphabet book and a quotation book into an eclectic whole. Read full book review >
OVER THE MOON by Rachel Vail
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Although young readers might not get all the theatrical posturing and angst, Nash's funny illustrations, with the hand-lettered dialogue appearing in conversation balloons, will elicit plenty of smiles, making Vail's first picture book a giddy success. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Vail (Daring to be Abigail, 1996, etc.) reimagines a nursery rhyme as a Broadway production headed for disaster; running concurrent with the lines of the rhyme is the exasperated exchanges between noted director, Hiram "Hi" Diddle Diddle, and his uncooperative cow. Read full book review >
HERE COMES THE TRAIN by Charlotte Voake
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

Voake (Ginger, 1997, etc.) coaxes wonders from scant text and spare, deft watercolors that detail the pleasures of waiting on a bridge for a train to pass underneath. Read full book review >
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER'S TREASURE by Ruth Hickcox
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Soman's illustrations work beautifully with the story, capturing with equal skill the great-grandmother's decades of zest, and the melancholy moments that befall the old and young alike. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A book that does a pretty good job of limning what to a child is a leap of faith not easily accomplished—picturing a great-grandmother as young, with a child's feelings, and involved in kid stuff. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

Based on material from the upcoming TV film Africa's Elephant Kingdom, this book follows the birth and life of a baby African elephant, Little Bull, and members of his herd in the national parks in Kenya and Zimbabwe. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >