ANIMAL DADS by Sneed B. Collard III
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

This striking picture book celebrates the many ways male animals function in their family units: Every page combines one line—narrated by the offspring—with a vividly colored, textured paper collage of an animal father and child, and an additional paragraph of information. Read full book review >
MA DEAR'S APRONS by Patricia C. McKissack
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"But there's love here, cast over David Earl's life with the same uncompromising grace Ma Dear brings to all things in their lives. (Picture book. 3-9)"
McKissack's story looks at a week in the life of a turn-of- the-century African-American boy and his mother. Read full book review >

COUNTING KITTENS by David Plummer
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"The end words often only approximate rhymes, and the meter—frequently distorted—does not facilitate reading aloud. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Counting Kittens (32 pp.; $13.95; PLB $15.95; Apr. 1997; 0-382- 39650-2; PLB 0-382-39649-9): Cute kittens of the greeting-card variety overrun the pages of an awkwardly written counting book. Read full book review >
ME, DAD & NUMBER 6 by Dana Andrew Jennings
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1997

"One quibble: The trees are as leafed out and green in March as they are at the end of the racing season, months later. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Jennings (for adults, Lonesome Standard Time, 1996, etc.) makes his picture-book debut with the story of Number 6, an inoperative 1937 Pontiac coupe that Andy's father tows home behind his pickup one Saturday. Read full book review >
WATCH WILLIAM WALK by Ann Jonas
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Text and illustrations are perfectly synchronized. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Jonas (The 13th Clue, 1992, etc.) pens an alliterative, winning work about the letter W. The simple story features two children, William and Wilma, a big black dog, Wally, and a white duck, Wanda. Read full book review >

TORTOISE BRINGS THE MAIL by Dee Lillegard
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Lund's bold line-and-watercolor illustrations spice up the story with humor: Crow looks like a pompous orator gesturing with his wings; Penelope Porcupine's mailbox bristles with spikes; and B.A. Bunny has a carrot-shaped nameplate. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Tortoise loves delivering the mail. Read full book review >
PECK SLITHER AND SLIDE by Suse MacDonald
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"A glossary of facts on all ten animals, too difficult for the picture-book audience, will be useful to adults sharing the book with children. (Picture book/nonfiction. 2-4)"
From MacDonald (with Bill Oakes, Once Upon Another, 1990, etc.), ten action verbs provide the setting for this guessing-game animal adventure for the very young. Read full book review >
MIZ FANNIE MAE'S FINE NEW EASTER HAT by Melissa Milich
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1997

"The faces almost uniformly wear smiles, rendering the book one-dimensional with its glowing good will. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A truth-is-stranger family story from Milich (Can't Scare Me!, 1995, etc.) and newcomer Chen. Read full book review >
HOW RABBIT LOST HIS TAIL by Ann Tompert
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Tompert has fashioned a good and simple porquoi tale from the Native American legend; Chwast's bold, color-drenched artwork, woodcut in style, gives the story a welcome verve. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
Seneca legend has it that Rabbit once had a long and flowing tail; Tompert (A Carol for Christmas, 1994) and Chwast offer a sturdy look at just how he lost it. Read full book review >
THE ANGEL'S MISTAKE by Francine Prose
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Families will find this is a savory treat for sharing. (Picture book. 5-9)"
The team behind Dybbuk (1996) have collaborated on a winsome story set in the legendary town of Chelm, charting its origins to the angel carrying a bag of ``stupid souls'' and mistakenly spilling them all in one town. Read full book review >
MR. SEMOLINA- SEMOLINUS by Anthony L. Manna
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1997

"The illustrations, with skewed perspectives, eccentric characterizations, superb color sense, and whimsical angles and swoops of line, elevate the tale; readers will be looking for stronger future efforts from these three. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
Told in the fashion of a Greek folktale, this story from newcomers Manna and Mitakidou has neither the steam nor the invention to match the impressive artwork of Potter's debut. Read full book review >
LIFETIMES by David Rice
NATURE
Released: April 1, 1997

"Venus flytraps remind us that things are not always as good as they first seem to be'') and limit the otherwise provocative and useful facts about lifetimes. (Nonfiction. 5-12)"
Old age is relative, depending on one's life span; a mayfly whose lifetime lasts one day reaches geezerhood by the time the sun sets. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >