GET DRESSED, SANTA! by Tomie dePaola
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Bubblicious curves edge this book's pages, echoing the pleasantly rotund drawings of Santa's bulging bag, belly, and behind. (Board book. 2-4)"
Getting dressed to go outside in the winter is a common ordeal for toddlers and preschoolers in cold climates. Read full book review >
POEMS OF CHILDHOOD by Joan Walsh Anglund
POETRY
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"The book is strictly for collectors: Most readers need something more than two dots for eyes, for true human expression includes smiles and frowns—or at least noses and mouths. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Greeting card verses and plenty of pastels make this volume by Anglund not much different from her previous books. Read full book review >

HIPPOS GO BERSERK! by Sandra Boynton
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Most of the fun will make perfect sense to preschoolers; give this to a slightly younger audience than those who love Jeff Sheppard's The Right Number of Elephants (1990). (Picture book. 2-5)"
Hippos Go Berserk ($14.00, paper $5.99; Oct. 1, 1996; 32 pp.; 0- 689-80854-2, paper 0-689-80818-6): A 20-year-old counting book gets new illustrations featuring, once again, the solitary hippo who invites two friends to what becomes a wild party as groups of three, then four hippos (up to nine) arrive and then depart. Read full book review >
KEEPER FOR THE SEA by Kimberley Smith Brady
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An intimate scene as the two prepare the fishing rod is painted against a vast starry sky, while one particularly masterful spread—of the upturned faces of the fisher folk as they watch the sky—builds anticipation. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Brady's first children's book is a low-key story of a fishing adventure shared by a girl and her grandfather that effectively conveys the moods of their outing, from the excitement of the catch to their awe for the natural world. Read full book review >
LONG LIVE MUSIC! by Massin
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"On each page, Silence the Giant (mildly) threatens to foreclose on the festivities, but he doesn't stand a chance of muffling this kinetic celebration. (Picture book. 4-10)"
This seductive and spirited history of music and musical instruments starts at the beginning with Neolithic bone flutes. Read full book review >

AUNT ISABEL MAKES TROUBLE by Kate Duke
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Mice and princesses are a tried-and-true winning combination, and readers of the first book as well as fans of Angelina Ballerina will not be disappointed. (Picture book. 4-7)"
From the creator of endearing guinea pigs comes the second sweet book about mice heroines and cockroach villains. Read full book review >
WHAT'S SO TERRIBLE ABOUT SWALLOWING AN APPLE SEED? by Harriet Lerner
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"For a sharper observance of truth and consequences, there's the Caldecott-winning classic by Evaline Ness, Sam, Bangs, and Moonshine. (Picture book. 4-8)"
O'Neill's sunny illustrations abet Lerner and Goldhor's first children's book but can't hoist it aloft. Read full book review >
THE ROOSTER'S GIFT by Pam Conrad
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

From just out of the egg, Rooster is imbued with a sense of destiny. Read full book review >
TELL ME AGAIN ABOUT THE NIGHT I WAS BORN by Jamie Lee Curtis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"In those scenes and others, Cornell's quirky watercolors enhance the book's tone and expand on its humor, effectively alternating between highly comic scenes and quieter, more loving ones. (Picture book. 2-8)"
Everyone—including adoptive parents and children longing for validation of their unique experiences—will embrace this pitch- perfect celebration of true family values. ``Tell me again'' is the endearing catchphrase a young girl employs to get her parents to recount the creation of their family: the late-night phone call (``Tell me again how you screamed''), a plane ride (``and how there was no movie, only peanuts''), the trip to the hospital (``you both got very quiet and felt very small''), love at first sight in the nursery (``you couldn't believe something so small could make you smile so big''). ``Tell me again about the first time you held me in your arms and called me your baby sweet. Read full book review >
GOING HOME by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by David Diaz
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"An affectionate, but not exceptional offering. (Picture book. 5-8)"
From the Caldecott Medal—winning team behind Smoky Night (1994), the story of a migrant family returning to Mexico for the Christmas holidays. Read full book review >
DMITRI THE ASTRONAUT by Jon Agee
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"A charmer. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Agee (The Return of Freddy LeGrand, 1992, etc.) scores again with this utterly engaging tale of interplanetary friendship. Read full book review >
CHUBBO'S POOL by Betsy  Lewin
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 20, 1996

"Lewin (Walk A Green Path, 1995, etc.) concludes with a picture glossary of the animals in the story, giving the common and scientific name for each, and mentions her real-life inspiration. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Chubbo, a selfish little hippo, doesn't want to share the pool of water he finds on the hottest day. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >