SOON, ANNALA by Riki Levinson
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

Completing the story of one family's 1910 immigration to New York (Watch the Stars Come Out, 1985, ALA Notable), Levinson focuses on middle child Annala, who's beginning to learn English while she waits impatiently for little Sammy and Elly, left behind with Aunt Marya. Read full book review >
A TALE OF TWO TENGU by Karen Kawamoto McCoy
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Fossey's delicate art, enhanced with brightly appealing color, is an excellent complement to McCoy's lively retelling of a tale that comes from her own childhood tradition. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Kenji and Joji are tengu—``goblins with long, lovely noses''—who constantly compete by extending them to huge lengths. Read full book review >

THE LAST CHRISTMAS PRESENT by Matt Novak
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Fans of Raymond Briggs's Father Christmas (1973) will be delighted to discover this new treat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A thoroughly contemporary twist on an old theme: little Irwin, in informal green and a peaked cap, is incessantly bossed by three big elves in suits and bowlers. Read full book review >
BOBBIN DUSTDOBBIN by Susan Patron
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

The baleful bit of under-bed dust introduced in Five Bad Boys, Billy Que, and the Dustdobbin (1992) has a daughter; and though her ``Papa Hob'' is now Billy Que's fast friend (they play checkers), Bobbin worries about the old man's broom. Read full book review >
ANDREW'S OWN PLACE by Nancy Riecken
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A quiet story that may well help build understanding of timid little homebodies like Andrew. (Picture book/Young reader. 3-8)"
Since Andrew likes things predictable—his own place at the table, the same kind of oatmeal each day, a special toothbrush slot—he's apprehensive when his family goes for an early morning picnic. Read full book review >

COYOTE AND THE MAGIC WORDS by Phyllis Root
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A sensible afterword distinguishes inspiration from invention. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Drawing on legends of southwestern Native Americans, Root formulates a new tale of the creation and the genesis of story: ``The Maker-of-all-things spoke the world into being''— `` `Earth' ''; `` `Moon'...'Stars' ''; `` `Sage'...'Juniper, cedar, pine' ''; `` `...jack rabbit, coyote' ''; last, she makes ``us.'' Then comes a time when words are magic and need only be spoken to be true, and when most creatures are content. Read full book review >
GRANDFATHER'S ROCK by Joel Strangis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"This isn't every family's answer; but its generosity is still worth pondering. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-9)"
A tale similar in theme to Grimms' ``The Wooden Bowl.'' Grandfather is too old to care for himself, so Father takes him in, though the family is so poor they have scarcely enough food. ``He fed me before I could work,'' he says. ``Now that he cannot work, I will feed him.'' Everyone loves the old man's stories- -especially the children, who forget their tasks to listen. Read full book review >
JUST A LITTLE BIT by Ann Tompert
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

With a nifty fillip of scientific principle, a delightful variant on such tales as ``The Turnip,'' where the last, smallest creature's help accomplishes a goal. Read full book review >
MAX AND RUBY'S FIRST GREEK MYTH by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A novel, entertaining introduction to the myth; better yet, another delightful episode in the saga of this irrepressible bunny. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Ruby catches Max touching her jewelry box despite her sign (``No! Read full book review >
A JOB FOR WITTILDA by Caralyn Buehner
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A slight tale, lively in the telling, with vibrantly comical Hopperesque illustrations featuring the dowdy, earnest witch and her delightful slew of bug-eyed cats. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Having trouble making ends meet, witch Wittilda kisses her 47 cats good-bye to go job-hunting, but promptly gets into trouble when, as a newly hired hairdresser, she arranges Mrs. Hatrack's hair into a web, complete with spider. Read full book review >
A NEW HOUSE FOR THE MORRISONS by Penny Carter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"With a predictable but satisfying outcome, a briskly amusing text, and sunny illustrations featuring amusingly expressive animal characters and many comical details, a promising debut. (Picture book/Easy reader. 4-8)"
Though little Albert likes their house, his parents are tired of it (``too plain''; ``too much grass to cut''), so they get realtor Mr. Sharkey to show them around—giving Carter a chance for some fanciful exaggeration of houses these alligators declare to be ``too large,'' ``too new'' (Albert writes his name on a modernistic white expanse), ``too old'' (ghosts), unfriendly, overcrowded, etc. At last they spot the perfect house (``Such a big lawn!...We could plant a nice garden'')—their old one. Read full book review >
EMILY AND ALICE by Joyce Champion
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Appealingly upbeat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The blossoming of a friendship, in three brief chapters to read aloud or alone. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >