DOG BRAIN by David Milgrim
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Lots of fun, and accessible to the very young. (Picture book. 2-7)"
Sneakers only appears to be the world's dumbest dog: He won't fetch, roll over, or obey any of the house rules. Read full book review >
BIG WIND COMING! by Karen English
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A beautiful book. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A hurricane is coming: Grandpa knows it because something about the air feels strange, Grandma knows it because her cake falls, and the animals know it, too. Read full book review >

THE CARE AND FEEDING OF FISH by Sarajo Frieden
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"What a fish! (Picture book. 4-8)"
While her parents love ``the sameness of their lives,'' Loulou longs for adventure. Read full book review >
DUKE THE DAIRY DELIGHT DOG by Lisa Campbell Ernst
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Ernst's (Red Riding Hood, 1995, etc.) signature illustrations fill each page with a variety of perspectives; this endearing tale gets more delicious with each encounter. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Duke is a delight in this book of funny oversized paintings and deadpan storytelling. Read full book review >
THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE by Carol Jones
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Jones (Hickory Dickory Dock, 1992, etc.) provides a sophisticated orchestration of a simple tune. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
The hare is the biggest braggart in the forest. Read full book review >

SNOW DAY by Moira Fain
by Moira Fain, illustrated by Moira Fain
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

Fain's first book for children, demure and even stilted in text and art, attempts to teach a lesson about self-expression. Read full book review >
WHERE JAMAICA GO? by Dale Gottlieb
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gottlieb uses her usual loose lines and bright colors to give this saucy piece plenty of bump and oomph. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A day in the life of a Caribbean girl is told by Gottlieb (Seeing Eye Willie, 1992, etc.) through three quick stories written in rhyme. Read full book review >
CROSBY by Dennis Haseley
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Just for the record, Crosby is drawn as a child with a dusky black complexion, while his new friend is small and yellow. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Crosby wears ratty old clothes and likes to save bits and pieces of junk. Read full book review >
THE GREEN FROGS by Yumi  Heo
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

From a Korean folktale, the story of two frogs who always do the opposite of what their mother tells them. Read full book review >
LUCKY'S 24-HOUR GARAGE by Daniel Kirk
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The jazzy design and bold, shiny artwork command more attention than the story; the string of unrelated incidents will recall old movies and other sources of nostalgia for adults but may not satisfy young children. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Stiff and stylized in the polished deco-style paintings, Angelo looks like a mannequin as he goes about pumping gas at Lucky's all-night garage, circa 1939. Read full book review >
THE GHOST OF NICHOLAS GREEBE by Tony Johnston
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Schindler's best pen-and-ink efforts, suggestive of Edward Gorey in New England mode, put some meat on these bones, but this sputtering tale wouldn't spook Ichabod Crane. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When old Nicholas Greebe dies on a wintry day, his shivering family buries him hastily in a shallow grave. Read full book review >
B IS FOR BABY by Myra Cohn Livingston
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The babies—in a multiracial array—are portrayed in inventive photographs that convey the children as strong individuals; when photo and poem mesh, the result can be quite winsome. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A photograph album of ordinary verses about extraordinary babies by a poet (Festivals, p. 456, etc.) who has written more portentous works, but perhaps not such personal ones. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >