HUE BOY by Rita Phillips Mitchell
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Like Hoffman's Amazing Grace (also illustrated by Binch, 1991), an extraordinarily warm portrait of a black child with a strongly positive self-image. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In her first book, a native of Belize depicts a happy, well- adjusted boy with only one problem: in his village, his small size is ``big news.'' Mama urges him to eat; Gran gives him big clothes to grow into; a neighbor suggests stretching exercises; the ``wisest man,'' the doctor, and the healer are consulted, but, still, Hue Boy doesn't grow ``at all, at all.'' But when tall papa, who's been away on the ship where he works, finally comes home, he doesn't even mention Hue Boy's size—and then Hue Boy ``walked tall, with his head held high...And he didn't feel small at all, at all.'' The simple, engaging story conveys its message quietly, but effectively. Read full book review >
GARTH PIG STEALS THE SHOW by Mary Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Told with Rayner's usual brisk good humor and nicely illustrated with deftly drawn, lively, and cheerfully resourceful pigs: a funny story with just enough suspense, sure to star with groups and independent readers alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A welcome return for little Garth and his big family; here, they've formed a band and are in concert with the help of a ringer, a lavender-gowned sousaphonist easily recognized (though not by the Pigs) as a wolf. Read full book review >

ARCTIC SPRING by Sue Vyner
by Sue Vyner, illustrated by Tim Vyner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

Several animals (arctic hare, arctic fox, ringed seals, narwhal, some unidentified birds) begin their spring cycles of activity. Read full book review >
TOM AND PIPPO ON THE BEACH by Helen Oxenbury
Released: May 1, 1993

"As always, Oxenbury's warm, skillfully drafted sketches and beautifully observed watercolors are perfection. (Picture book. 1-5)"
It's grand to have the toddler and his toy monkey back for another visit. Read full book review >
BELINDA by Pamela Allen
by Pamela Allen, illustrated by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Australian; perfect to share with a group. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Bessie milks Belinda every day, while Old Tom grows vegetables; but when Bessie goes to visit her daughter, Old Tom is to do the milking. ``There's a good girl,'' he croons, whereupon Belinda declares her intentions with ``one almighty kick.'' She's faster than he is, and also smart enough to snatch the carrot he offers before escaping. Read full book review >

OPPOSITES by Gwenda Turner
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Still, an appealing book that will be useful in many collections. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 1-5)"
From New Zealand, a simple, attractive concept book that explores ten pairs of words in situations sure to interest the very young—``open'' and ``closed'' (eyes, mouth, door), ``round'' and ``square'' (glasses, cake), etc. Concise boldface captions (on one spread, ``hat on/hat off,'' ``shoes on/shoes off'') give early readers an opportunity to make connections. Read full book review >
E I E I O by Gus Clarke
adapted by Gus Clarke, illustrated by Gus Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Good fun. (Folklore/Picture book. 2-7)"
Any new edition of ``Old MacDonald'' needs a compelling novelty to justify its existence; here, the author-illustrator of Eddie and Teddy (1991) comes up with an elaborate scheme of incorporating the animals' ``quacks,'' ``moos,'' etc., in cartoon-style balloons that are cleverly integrated into the text on the verso pages where they are first introduced; on the rectos, the animals assemble in their increasing numbers to issue a comical cacophony for new readers to sort out. Read full book review >
ARTHUR'S FAMILY VACATION by Marc Brown
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"On his 17th outing, Arthur continues to be an unusually likable role model; amusing, healthy fare. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Arthur would rather join his friends for baseball practice or camp, but his parents are firm: it's going to be a weeklong family vacation. Read full book review >
CHATTERBOX JAMIE by Nancy Evans Cooney
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"A drama that many young ones will recognize as just their size. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Jamie is full of questions at home; but when he starts nursery school, he clams up—totally. Read full book review >
I GOT A FAMILY by Melrose Cooper
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1993

"(Picture book. 4-8)"
A child describes her family of six—from Great-Gran to the cat—in engagingly informal compact verse: ``I got an Uncle, loves me wishin'./He's got a special place for fishin',/Says that he's shared it just with me!/Hunkerin' under his willow tree/Right where the riverbed meets the streams,/We bait our gear and cast our dreams.'' Each six-line verse deftly sketches a character and an entire relationship, neatly encapsulated in a key word at the end of the first line, whether it's ``Brother, loves me hard,/ roughhousin'...'' or ``Mamma, loves me sewin'/Keeps all the hems in my dresses growin'...Wraps me in comfort all year through.'' The whole family is beautifully summed up in a last verse, concluding: ``I got a heart that loves `em back!'' Gottlieb's bright, bold illustrations—a few broad, rough black lines define vibrant areas of solid color—make a classy complement to the freshness and power of Cooper's joyful imagery. Read full book review >
FLY BY NIGHT by June Crebbin
Released: May 1, 1993

Little Blink sleeps by day, then waits at night for Mother Owl to come home. Read full book review >
BEES, WASPS, AND ANTS by George S. Fichter
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 5-10)"
This handsome hardcover (one of four in the new ``Golden Junior Guides'' series) is a bargain at $4.95, with dozens of vivid color illustrations. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >