GUS AND GRANDPA RIDE THE TRAIN by Claudia Mills
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 23, 1998

"The stories and art have a deceptive simplicity missing from the first book, and carry understated messages of love and sharing between a boy and his kindly grandfather; as Mills makes clear, they may be a bit forgetful, but they never forget that they love each other. (Fiction. 5-8)"
In another affectionate look at Gus and Grandpa (1997), the pair exhibit their mutual passion for trains. Read full book review >
WATER VOICES by Toby Speed
HUMOR
Released: March 23, 1998

Riddle fanciers will enjoy this book, in which Speed (Whoosh! Read full book review >

THE PUDDLE by David McPhail
ANIMALS
Released: March 20, 1998

"In watercolor illustrations that make plain how real the boy's imaginings are to him, McPhail nimbly weds the simple pleasure of being out in the rain with a light adventure. (Picture book. 2-5)"
From McPhail (Edward and the Pirates, 1997, etc.), a tale that demonstrates that rainy days provide lots of interesting possibilities, at least for the boy who lives in a world where alligators visit puddles, and elephants drain them dry. ``It was a rainy day. Read full book review >
TOGETHER IN PINECONE PATCH by Thomas F. Yezerski
FICTION
Released: March 19, 1998

"The story has the ring of an oft-told family story, yet is universal enough that children will grasp both the tensions and resolution, in a place and time that only seems long ago and far away. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A family story that will resonate for many young readers, with wonderful pictures that seem drawn from a photo album. Read full book review >
AND IF THE MOON COULD TALK by Kate Banks
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 18, 1998

"Readers and listeners alike will find that the poetic text and molten illustrations glow, ember-like, long after the child of the book has been tucked in and the moon has murmured its good-night. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Savor the endpapers, which open with a van Goghlike night scene of muted, window-lit houses clustered around a shining lake. Read full book review >

BATH-TIME BOOTS by Satoshi Kitamura
ANIMALS
Released: March 17, 1998

"With its companion, A Friend for Boots, this one joins Kitamura's other board books (Duck Is Dirty, Cat Is Sleepy, etc., 1996) in offering some very brief but jovial outings for toddlers. (Board books. 1-3)"
In general, cats hate baths, and Boots will do anything to avoid a scrubdown. Read full book review >
MY FRIEND GORILLA by Atsuko Morozumi
ANIMALS
Released: March 16, 1998

"At their best, these illustrations are just big and real enough for kids to easily imagine having a gorilla as a best friend. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In a follow-up to the counting book One Gorilla (1990), Morozumi's latest gorilla escapade is a child's fantasy come true. Read full book review >
LITTLE LIONS by Jim Arnosky
ANIMALS
Released: March 16, 1998

"Still, toddlers will cozy up to these pictures, which do not idealize wild creatures as much as present them for observation in terms that make sense to the very young. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A mother mountain lion basks in the sun while her roly-poly kits play on the rock ledge beside her. Read full book review >
SPIKE by Paulette Bogan
ANIMALS
Released: March 16, 1998

"Amiable illustrations with strong lines and an expressive Spike pick up on all his ineptitudes and add mightily to the fun. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Bogan's first picture book features a dog attempting to ditch his canine inclinations before discovering that being a dog is actually what he does best. Read full book review >
THE BUSY BUILDING BOOK by Sue Tarsky
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 16, 1998

"Ayliffe concentrates on soaring perspectives and congenial, cluttered settings; the imaginative use of colors and shapes keeps all the girders, building materials, and scenes distinct. (Picture book. 2-6)"
From the opening page, readers are launched into a description of a construction site: ``Before construction can start, the site is boarded off to keep pedestrians out.'' Every double-page spread presents a short text and the steady progress at the site of a future office building, with labels and pointers for about 20 items in the scene (e.g., ``site hoarding sheets,'' ``safety officer,'' and ``dump truck''). Read full book review >
LEPRECHAUN GOLD by Teresa Bateman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 15, 1998

"The soft watercolors are full of funny, smudged details, and the full-face portrait of the lady with the golden hair captures the magic of the text. (Picture book. 5-9)"
This charming tale has an Irish lilt that would certainly withstand an energetic reading out loud—and not just on St. Read full book review >
CROSS A BRIDGE by Ryan Ann Hunter
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 15, 1998

"The text finally takes flight on the last page, reaching beyond the mechanical, with 'Bridges are for sitting, and fishing, and wishing.' (Picture book. 3-6)"
Young construction and transportation enthusiasts are inducted into the world of bridges with this boldly illustrated primer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >