THE GINGERBREAD DOLL by Susan Tews
FICTION
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"Lloyd's sharply observed realistic watercolors—in a palette somewhat grayed as if to recall old b&w photos—beautifully reflect this well-told story's warmth and focus on essential values. (Picture book/Young reader. 5-9)"
When the extended family gathers for its annual cookie baking, great-grandma Rebecca tells about her ninth Christmas, in 1930 during the Depression. Read full book review >
WE HAVE A BABY by Cathryn Falwell
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"An inviting concept book that should find a warm welcome in many newly expanded families. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Flat, collage-like illustrations in textured, blanket-soft areas of color depict a toddler watching and helping his/her parents care for an infant, each activity captioned with the phrase ``A baby to...,'' and ending with a different verb: ``love''; ``touch''; ``wash''; ``hold''; ``feed'' (this one is breast-fed); etc. The father is shown caring for the baby as often as the mother; the family is generically dark, but not very dark, while the baby has blue eyes. Read full book review >

THE FIVE-DOG NIGHT by Eileen Christelow
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"A good-natured, entertaining yarn. (Picture book. 4-9)"
A story with a premise that's bound to amuse: Old Betty, Ezra's neighbor, is forever pestering him, when she calls to bring cookies and make him tea, about his need for extra blankets. ``Not me,'' he insists, refusing to elaborate beyond remarking, next day that ``It was only a two-dog night.'' As fall moves into winter, the number rises until the curious Betty peers in Ezra's window—and sees what Christelow's cheery, cartoon- style illustrations have revealed all along: as it gets colder, Ezra just pulls on another of his five dogs. Read full book review >
FISH STORY by Katharine Andres
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 10, 1993

"Sophisticated whimsy, not for every taste but sure to find an audience. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Craig isn't a fisherman, but he's sitting in a boat musing about wishes when he strikes up a conversation with a huge fish. ``Otto'' has just realized he can grant wishes; he goes home with Craig (``graceful[ly] skimming along on his tail''), stays for dinner (on wife Ann's invitation; Craig cooks), and engages in gentle discussion—with mild philosophical overtones—about what wishes would be appropriate. Read full book review >
UNCLE JED'S BARBER SHOP by Margaree King Mitchell
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 10, 1993

"A fine, unusually engaging debut for Mitchell, celebrating the courage and humanity of men who could survive hard times and injustice without rancor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Great-uncle Jed, Sarah Jean's ``favorite relative,'' travels from house to house as ``the only black barber in the county.'' When he comes to cut her daddy's hair, he explains that he's saving for a shop. Read full book review >

WHAT IS A WALL, AFTER ALL? by Judy Allen
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"With much intriguing detail— and a particularly intriguing title spread of a many-cornered wall that, in Baron's artful perspective, makes a straight line across the pages: excellent nonfiction, sure to amuse. (Nonfiction. 5-9)"
A lighthearted but searching and intelligent exploration of the concept and lore of walls, from dry-stone structures to honeycombs and tin cans. Read full book review >
TEN TALL OAKTREES by Richard Edwards
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"It's a clever idea, neatly phrased in verse but imperfectly developed in the rather ordinary illustrations, where the changing periods and activities are indicated competently enough but the trees never age or grow in 400 years. (Picture book. 4-8)"
From a Scottish author, an environmental/historical countdown, beginning with a scene in Tudor Britain: ``Ten tall oaktrees/Standing in a line,/`Warships,' cried King Henry,/Then there were nine.'' In the 18th century, one tree goes for charcoal; lightning, firewood, barrels, and the wind account for others, with the last succumbing, in this century, to a builder, a council (``unsafe''), ``progress'' (a highway), and a farmer (though why he finds the last tree a ``nuisance'' in a field of sheep remains a mystery). Read full book review >
ONE STORMY NIGHT by Ruth Brown
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A truly charming, offbeat alternative for Halloween or anytime. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The wind is howling, but a full moon shines the night the little white dog comes in the wrought-iron gate to explore a stately home dating back to Elizabethan times. Read full book review >
LEAVING HOME WITH A PICKLE JAR by Barbara Dugan
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Still, unusually perceptive, well-told, and likable. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The author of Loop the Loop (1992, ALA Notable) tells another story remarkable for its sensitivity and deft interweaving of themes. Read full book review >
CHIPMUNK! by Jessie Haas
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Just right to share with the younger preschoolers, as well as a book beginning readers will enjoy. (Picture book. 3- 7)"
``All Puss wanted was a place to put her chipmunk so it couldn't get away,'' begins this comically succinct reprise of a conflict of interests in a country household. Read full book review >
NANA'S BIRTHDAY PARTY by Amy Hest
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"What an orderly, likable family. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In her big apartment on N.Y.C.'s 86th Street, Nana prepares for her party as she does every year, with her daughters and their daughters, Maggie and Brette, coming the night before to help. Read full book review >
I LOVE YOU AS MUCH... by Laura Krauss Melmed
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Song, however, is far more successful—both because the concept is more original and because it rejoices in the splendidly creative illustrations of Ed Young. (Picture book. 2-5)"
``Said the mother bear to her child,/`I love you as much as the forest has trees''': eight animals utter similar comparisons, sometimes involving food (the sheep loves the lamb ``as much as the grass''), which is logical; but at least one is curiously inapt—the camel loves ``her child...as much as the desert is dry.'' Sorensen provides sweeping double-spread paintings with appealing mother-child pairs, concluding with humans, but, overall, this is a slight effort. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >