TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >
LILI AT BALLET by Rachel Isadora
FICTION
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"There's little mention here of discipline or hard work; still, an attractive and informative first look. (Picture book. 4-9)"
With a minimal explanatory text, a realistic depiction of a serious young ballet student and her class. Read full book review >

ZEBRA'S HICCUPS by David McKee
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"Try this when someone really does have the hiccups. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Dapper zebra is far too dignified to follow his friends' advice for getting rid of his hiccups—drinking water upside down simply isn't his style. Read full book review >
A PILE OF PIGS by Judith Ross Enderle
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 16, 1993

"A simple idea developed with panache—delightful. (Picture book. 3- 7)"
Stirred by a busybody rooster (``Strut-a-doodle doo! Read full book review >
ROSIE AND THE PAVEMENT BEARS by Susie Jenkin-Pearce
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"Predictable and somewhat overstated, but told with enough realism and verve to hold interest; the author's freely drawn, cartoon-style illustrations are lively and nicely expressive. (Picture book. 4- 8)"
Timid Rosie, smallest in her class, dreads bullies; still, when they taunt her about stepping on the cracks (``The bears'll get you''), she's assertive enough to do just that, on purpose. Read full book review >

MAX AND FELIX by Larry Dane Brimner
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 9, 1993

"As a theme, photos misfiring wears a little thin by the fourth brief chapter; still, the perky, natural-sounding dialogue and funny, lively illustrations are sure to appeal to young readers. (Picture book/Easy reader. 3-7)"
In the best easy-reader tradition, Max and Felix are friends who engage in mildly witty dialogue while negotiating the unexpected results of their various efforts. Read full book review >
SMART DOG by Ralph Leemis
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 8, 1993

Comfortably ensconced in his porch rocker, the man addresses his dog—``If you were a smart dog, you'd chase that rabbit''— and goes on to suggest less and less likely activities, from barely plausible tricks (``You'd dance on a drum'') to full-scale tall tale (``while you conducted your string quartet, the crowd would applaud as you juggled''), all resulting in fame, uproar, and wealth—which, in the end, would enable them to retire in ``a small house in the country for two,'' as they have already done. Read full book review >
SNOWY by Berlie Doherty
by Berlie Doherty, illustrated by Keith Bowen
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

A two-time Carnegie winner, acclaimed for her poetic, richly perceptive novels (Granny Was a Buffer Girl, 1988), gives a uniquely British flavor to a familiar scenario: Miss Smith asks her students to bring their pets to school; when Rachel can't produce the one she glowingly describes (``He's as big as a mountain...And he's got bells and ribbons and a swingletree. Read full book review >
COTTON MILL TOWN by Kathleen Hershey
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Still, memory is selective, and the nostalgia's warm glow is genuine. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Speaking in the voice of the child she was when ice-cream cones were a nickel, the author reminisces about visiting her grandmama in North Carolina. Read full book review >
BACKYARD BEAR by Jim Murphy
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Brief but interesting bibliography, including books from several state agencies. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Told mostly from a bear's point of view, a thoughtful, nonjudgmental, and scrupulously realistic depiction of people in uneasy confrontation with the wild. Read full book review >
HANK'S WORK by Joshua Schreier
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The bold, stylized forms and bright colors will be fine for groups; also, a good choice to share with the art teacher. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The author of Luigi's All-Night Parking Lot (1990) enriches a story about a boy—a boy whose dad is too busy to recognize the importance of his son's activities—with a fantasy element dramatizing the intensity of a child's imagination. Read full book review >
WHO SAYS A DOG GOES BOW-WOW? by Hank De Zutter
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"There's some disparity between format and subject appeal here; still, creative adults are sure to find uses for this attractive, multicultural look at a classic topic. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Only in English does the dog say ``Bow-wow''; Finns, Turks, Russians, and Poles agree it's ``How-how,'' while a dozen other languages come up with even more transliterations, as different as ``Ar-ar'' and ``Mong-mong.'' Varying his introductory question only slightly (``What does a lamb say?'' ``How does a cat sound?''), De Zutter lists sounds attributed to 16 animals, in several tongues for each. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >