LUNCH by Denise Fleming
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"With large areas of brilliant, subtly modulated color and handsome compositions incorporating boldface type, a beautifully crafted book that's sure to delight young audiences. (Picture book. 0-5)"
Again using her unique medium—brightly colored pulp applied to a screen to make ``handmade paper in which the stenciled images have become a part of the paper itself''—the author of Count (p. 51) creates a lively introduction to the colors: a simple story about a mouse who eats nine fruits and vegetables whose juices leave patches of stain on the appealing little creature, who tracks them across the clean, white pages and then exhibits them for identification in the last illustration. Read full book review >
GOODNIGHT TO ANNIE by Eve Merriam
FICTION
Released: Sept. 14, 1992

"Not a standout, but attractive and usable. (Picture book. 2-7)"
From the late poet, an unrhymed alphabet in which every line suggests the drowsy time before dreamland: ``Jugglers have put aside their jiggling, jouncing balls'' or ``Waves wash over the shore with a hush, shush, shhh....Xebecs are slowly sailing in the Mediterranean mist.'' The subjects aren't exceptional, but Schwartz depicts them with precision and affection, including a gently rounded capital letter in each carefully structured illustration. Read full book review >

PANCHO'S PIÑATA by Stefan Czernecki
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 14, 1992

"The story here is unexceptional, but it serves to showcase customs surrounding the pi§ata and the posada; the well-designed illustrations, in the vibrant colors that characterize Mexican art, are decorative and appealing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
As little Pancho—dressed as an angel—leads his village's Christmas Eve procession, he hears the cries of a star impaled on an ancient cactus and frees it with his long staff. Read full book review >
SALT by Jane Langton
adapted by Jane Langton, translated by Alice Plume, illustrated by Ilse Plume
Released: Sept. 14, 1992

"Not particularly lively, but pleasing. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
One of the Russian folklorist Afanasyev's more familiar tales (a despised youngest son woos a princess, wins out over his malicious brothers, and ensures the family's continuing fortunes by discovering a supply of salt) is gracefully recounted and set within elegant borders. Read full book review >
WHISTLING THE MORNING IN by Lillian Morrison
POETRY
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Nice. (Poetry. 5-10)"
A few of these 28 brief offerings have appeared in periodicals, but most are ``New Poems'' from a favorite poet, perhaps best known for her anthologies on sports (Sprints and Distances, 1965). Read full book review >

LUCY'S WINTER TALE by Amy Ehrlich
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Intriguing. (Young reader/Picture book. 5-9)"
In an imaginative tale echoing old-fashioned stories of running off with gypsies, Lucy—a child of an earlier time who's been taught to do as she's told—gets onto her father's horse with a mysterious stranger and rides into the night. Read full book review >
ELMER BLUNT'S OPEN HOUSE by Matt Novak
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"His sturdy, ebullient creatures are splendidly expressive; the comical details of their antics are delightful. (Picture book. 3-8)"
After oversleeping, Elmer hurries off to work, leaving his door open. Read full book review >
BACK HOME by Gloria Jean Pinkney
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

In her picture-book debut, the author—as Donald Crews did in Bigmama's (1991, ALA Notable)—re-creates the childhood experience of coming from a northern city to visit relatives in the rural South. Read full book review >
THE ESCAPE OF MARVIN THE APE by Caralyn Buehner
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Good fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Like Fatio's Happy Lion, Marvin leaves his cage at the zoo through an open door; unlike the lion, no one ever notices him as he roams—reading on the subway, giving his order to a bored waiter, catching a foul at a ballgame, or playing checkers in a park—nor does he return to the zoo (a hippo-escape provides the conclusion). Read full book review >
THE SNOW SPEAKS by Nancy White Carlstrom
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A lovely evocation, nicely concluded with a cozy Christmas by the fire—and angels, in snow and sky. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An Alaskan author describes the experience of cold weather and snow with poetic grace and the conviction of one who knows the ``thin, brittle air'' that makes ``nostrils stick together'' and children who must stay ``buttoned, hooded, mittened, zipped'' while shaking snow from the mail. Read full book review >
THE TROUBLE WITH UNCLE by Babette Cole
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Not essential, but fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A wickedly zany narrative about Uncle, who ``doesn't just play around with boats'' (e.g., the pictured remote-controlled craft in a park)—``He's a pirate!'' With grown-ups looking askance, he buys a treasure map, sets sail even though he can't do enough math to navigate, catches a ride on an accommodating whale, finds the treasure island developed and occupied by tourists, rescues a movie star kidnapped by real pirates, and marries a mermaid on the way home. Read full book review >
HUGH CAN DO by Jennifer Armstrong
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An attractive book that will be fun to share aloud. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In an original tale with a folkloric lilt, a persistent orphan in need of a toll for the bridge to what he hopes will be good fortune goes on an ``Old Woman and Her Pig''-style quest: the Toll Man requests a loaf of bread; the baker asks Hugh to get his grain ground; the miller needs his apron mended; and so forth. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Gabrielle Zevin
March 3, 2015

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over—and see everything anew. “Zevin writes characters who grow and prosper,” our reviewer writes, “in a narrative that is sometimes sentimental, sometimes funny, sometimes true to life and always entertaining.” View video >