OTTER PLAY by Nancy Luenn
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

"A playful, inventive way of connecting young viewers to the natural world. (Picture book. 5-7)"
In a brief text, Luenn (Mother Earth, 1992, etc.) explores the parallels between a family of humans and a family of otters a few yards away who mimic each other through a peaceful day on the river, fishing, enjoying a meal, swimming, horsing around, settling down for the night. Read full book review >
ACROSS THE BIG BLUE SEA by Jakki Wood
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

"As curious as the macaroni penguins investigating the boat from an ice floe off the southern tip of Africa, children will learn a smattering of geography as they trace the boat's travels along a route marked with arrows in a final world map. (Picture book. 3-7)"
First published in Britain as The Deep Blue Sea, this is an extraordinary ocean wildlife book for beginners, in which the addition of a tiny boat'smaller than the eye of a blue whale or the bottlenose of a dolphin—creates anticipation by forecasting the journey. Read full book review >

TINKER AND TOM AND THE STAR BABY by David McPhail
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

Whimsical, fantastical—and even a little silly—this nighttime story from McPhail (The Puddle, p. 58, etc.) has plenty of child appeal. Read full book review >
HERE COME THE BRIDES by Ellen Jackson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1998

"Gary Soto's Snapshots From the Wedding (1997) is more fun, but this will fit the bill for those looking for a drier, fact-based approach. (bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
PLB 0-8027-8469-0 It is hard not to get fussy and a bit sentimental when talking about wedding mores and customs, as is the case here. Read full book review >
A PILLOW FOR MY MOM by Charissa Sgouros
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1998

"Just as affecting are Ross's illustrations, expressing all the vulnerability of the young girl's plight. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Sgouros debuts with a terse story that packs a wallop—and it ought to, for its subject is grief. Read full book review >

GARBAGE COLLECTORS by Paulette Bourgeois
NATURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"This is an informative yet light-handed treatment of the important job of workers who make daily contributions to community health and safety. (Picture book. 3-7)"
In an entry in the In My Neighborhood series, garbage collectors Sam and Mabel answer children's questions about their work as they complete their daily route. Read full book review >
THE BRAVE LITTLE PARROT by Rafe Martin
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"Close-ups of wildlife bring readers face to face with majestic tigers, eagles, elephants, and the earnest, brave-hearted parrot—she'll win hearts with her theatrical heroics. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
In the story of a god disguised as an eagle that descends to earth to aid a small parrot, Martin (The Eagle's Gift, p. 1225, etc.) offers one of the jataka tales from India, which chronicle the past lives of Buddha. Read full book review >
HOORAY FOR DIFFENDOOFER DAY! by Dr. Seuss
Released: April 1, 1998

"It's a model collaboration, because the spirits involved—including Schulman's—are so obviously kindred. (Picture book. 4-10)"
When Theodor Geisel died in 1991, he had left behind a half-sketched idea for a book, an ode to joy and eccentricity in education. Read full book review >
THE GINGERBREAD MAN by Jim Aylesworth
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1998

"With Richard Egielski's The Gingerbread Boy (1997) hot off the press and other fine variations of the tale still in print, it's hard to make the case for this one, other than to appreciate its antique look. (Picture book/folklore. 4-6)"
A traditional cumulative tale, which Aylesworth (My Sister's Rusty Bike, 1996, etc.) endows with a lively pace, is illustrated in a decidedly old-fashioned style, giving the book the look and feel of a reproduction of an old edition. Read full book review >
A SOUTH AFRICAN NIGHT by Rachel Isadora
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Children will be fascinated by this co-existence—a peaceable kingdom of sorts, with every rotation of the earth. (Picture book. 5-7)"
PLB 0-688-11390-7 South Africa by day is a bustling city with tall buildings, teeming crowds, and busy markets; but at night the animals reign. Read full book review >
CHERRY PIES AND LULLABIES by Lynn Reiser
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1998

"A music sheet is included for the lullaby, as well as a family tree, an author's note on her family history, and a page depicting the generations of the homes of her relatives. (Picture book. 4-8)"
PLB 0-688-13392-4 From Reiser (Best Friends Think Alike, 1997, etc.), an original and attractive tribute to feminine arts and crafts, in a personal history of one family's changing traditions. Read full book review >
PLAY ALL DAY by Julie Paschkis
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"So Sad, 1995) provides charming scenes of domesticity that often outpace the fantasy spreads. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Play All Day ($15.95; Apr.; 32 pp.; 0-316-69043-0): A bedtime book alternates vignettes of a boy at play with double- page, full-bleed spreads of his far more imaginative version of events. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >