THE PAPERBOY by Dav Pilkey
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Pilkey (The Hallow-Wiener, 1995, etc.) may have created a throwback to a simpler time by presenting work as a desirable activity for children; this book is a gentle salve for the instability in so much of modern life. (Picture book. 4-10)"
A quiet, solid mood piece with a quiet, solid protagonist, who becomes a hero simply by doing his job every day. Read full book review >
THE SOMEDAY HOUSE by Anne Shelby
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Pair this with Eve Bunting's Fly Away Home (1991) or Elizabeth Hathorn's Way Home (1994) to set younger readers thinking. (Picture book. 5-7)"
This flight of imagination by Shelby (Homeplace, 1995, etc.) has a poignant cast. ``Someday,'' promises the narrator, ``we'll live in a house on a mountain. Read full book review >

OLD MACDONALD by Jessica Souhami
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Grand for the preschool set. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A highly entertaining and inventive version of a favorite song, with plenty of surprises in the gatefolds. Read full book review >
TRAIN by Charles Temple
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"For story hour sharing or quiet read-alones. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In his driving, rhythmic text, Temple (Cadillac, 1995) evokes all the huffing, puffing, swaying, clacking, rattling wonder of a long train ride—from daybreak departure to nighttime, when ``the seats go turning into beds.'' Johnson's loosely painted, full-bleed acrylics nicely capture the mood of the journey from every angle; sometimes he focuses on the passengers and interiors of the train, other times he views the train from the distant perspective of a man in jail or the cows in the field. Read full book review >
A CARIBBEAN COUNTING BOOK by Faustin Charles
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Arenson's pictures crackle with color; bold forms sashay happily across vibrant backgrounds. (Picture book/poetry. 4-8)"
Cheerful collages with tropical colors match the spirit of these counting chants, games, and skipping rhymes; those wishing to build or add to multicultural collections will value this rhythmic compilation. Read full book review >

SWEET, SWEET FIG BANANA by Phillis Gershator
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Gershator (Sambalena Show-Off, 1995, etc.) pens a sweet, sweet tale; newcomer Millevoix's primitive illustrations are rough but decorative, enhancing the story's exotic setting. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Soto plants a banana shoot by his home in the Virgin Islands and oversees its growth; the development of the fruit is watched not only by the boy, but by tree rats and thrushees as well. Read full book review >
THE BAT IN THE BOOT by Annie Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Warmly recommended. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Cannon's first solo outing (she illustrated Jo Carson's You Hold Me and I'll Hold You, 1992) demonstrates she is as at home with text as she is with pictures. Read full book review >
FLY WITH THE BIRDS by Richard Edwards
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Kitamura's bee-busy, lighthearted illustrations prevent the exercise from becoming too professorial; his trademark clutter will keep children poring over the pages. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A day in the life of an imaginative girl, told in singsong. Read full book review >
METROPOLITAN COW by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"A Deco air invests the story with a droll mood and city shadows—the colors are muted, and the wit is urbane. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bennett Gibbon is a lonely bovine, the only calf in his part of town. Read full book review >
MY BROTHER, ANT by Betsy Byars
Released: March 1, 1996

"1277, etc.) spins the tales in dialogue, and the pace never lags; Simont provides charming scenes of the boys together. (Picture book. 5-7)"
An effective pairing of author and illustrator in a disarming Easy-to-Read entry. Read full book review >
OH, GROW UP! by Florence Parry Heide
POETRY
Released: March 1, 1996

Twenty-nine funny poems about the everyday indignities of childhood, from braces and hand-me-downs to the rigors of family and school life: ``Could anything be drearier/than the food in the school cafeteria?'' Westcott's bright, zany ink-and-watercolor illustrations and hand-lettered titles get right into the poems, sometimes encasing lines in dialogue balloons, sometimes adding an extra element to the drama, as in ``Danger: Overload,'' in which a busy mother fires a list of chores at her daughter, who then gets them hopelessly mixed up. Read full book review >
THE AUNT IN OUR HOUSE by Angela Johnson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1996

"Readers never know why the aunt has come to stay, but they will certainly understand that the family's life is enhanced by her presence in this subtle and affecting work. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A restrained, somewhat sorrowful work from two frequent collaborators (The Leaving Morning, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marilu Henner
author of CHANGING NORMAL
April 26, 2016

After they’d been dating only a short while, and as they were falling in love, Marilu Henner and Michael Brown were hit with the ultimate bad news: Michael was diagnosed with cancer. Refusing traditional care, they pieced together a personal and holistic view on battling his cancer, all while forging an unbreakable bond. In this moving and informative book, Marilu pulls back the curtain on how they dealt with the blow. She relates her holistic perspective on health—including the superfoods, exercises, and immunotherapy they used to fight back—and why a diagnosis doesn’t have to be the end of romance or of a happy and fulfilling life. “An inspiring love story wrapped in a serious call for new ways to treat disease,” our reviewer writes. View video >