SOME SMUG SLUG by Pamela Duncan Edwards
ANIMALS
Released: April 30, 1996

This duo collaborated on the alliterative Four Famished Foxes and Fosdyke (1995, not reviewed); here, a supercilious little slug struggles up a bumpy slope blocking the path through its woodland domain. Read full book review >
ROCKY BOBOCKY, THE PIZZA MAN by Emily Ellison
FICTION
Released: April 26, 1996

"Bolling, in a style that recalls some of Julie Vivas's work, injects pizzazz into every scene, often with a profusion of pink pomodoro. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Some appetizing ingredients have been whipped up into a familiar plot that starts out hot and cools in the delivery. Read full book review >

FIRST, SECOND by Daniil Kharms
by Daniil Kharms, illustrated by Marc Rosenthal, translated by Richard Pevear
ADVENTURE
Released: April 25, 1996

"Rosenthal's superb illustrations are an irresistible cross- pollination of the Katzenjammer Kids with the daft tricksters found in Zap comics, situated in flat, graphically sophisticated landscapes. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
Every journey has its logistical problems, but they come peck by drove in this absurdist's delight, penned in the 1930s by the Russian Kharms. Read full book review >
UNO, DOS, TRES: ONE, TWO, THREE by Pat Mora
FICTION
Released: April 22, 1996

"EWSLUGp1991, but in art this stylized, it probably doesn't matter. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Another bilingual rhyme from Mora (Listen to the Desert/Oye al Desierto, 1994, etc.), this one a simple one-to-ten counting book featuring two little girls in a Mexican market who are buying birthday presents for their mother. Read full book review >
THE OLD MAN AND HIS DOOR by Gary Soto
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 16, 1996

"It's a story children will want to retell themselves. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Soto (The Cat's Meow, 1995, etc.) has a lighthearted approach to the perils of miscommunication. Read full book review >

DOGS DON'T WEAR GLASSES by Adrienne Geoghegan
ANIMALS
Released: April 16, 1996

"For preschoolers, satisfying silliness. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Nanny Needles, readers discover in the pictures, needs glasses, but she places the blame for all the accidents around the house on her poor dog: When she dumps the trash on the floor, Seymour is reprimanded for his clumsiness; when she washes his blanket and bones instead of the laundry, she decides that Seymour needs a haircut to improve his eyesight. Read full book review >
MY NEW SANDBOX by Donna Jakob
FICTION
Released: April 8, 1996

"The illustrations —stylized graphics in bright, airbrushed acrylics—make the action accessible and child-sized, and add to the bold and visually appealing whole. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When a boy gets a new sandbox in his backyard, one that's just his size, he wants it all to himself. ``Get out,'' he shouts to a bug, a bird, a dog, and a girl. Read full book review >
BEDTIME, EVERYBODY! by Mordicai Gerstein
FICTION
Released: April 8, 1996

"The story will appeal to parents faced with active children at bedtime; listeners will recognize the ploys of the toys and be soothed. (Picture book. 3-7)"
An amiable bedtime tale about a young girl who tries to get her stuffed toys to settle down at bedtime, even though none of them are sleepy. Read full book review >
THE LONG, LONG LETTER by Elizabeth Spurr
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 8, 1996

"A jolly tall tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Aunt Hetta is lonely. Read full book review >
LITTLE CLOUD by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: April 6, 1996

"The result is a philosophical suggestion, scaled to a child's sensibility, as open to interpretation as the passing clouds. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A sophisticated idea deftly packed into a simple text. Read full book review >
CAMEL CARAVAN by Bethany Roberts
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"Taylor has gotten the camels' expressions of imperturbable, supercilious hauteur exactly right, making it all the funnier when they lose it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
There's a long tradition of stories about various forms of transport running amok, from Virginia Lee Burton's Choo Choo and Hardie Gramatky's Little Toot to some of W. Awdry's stories about Thomas the Tank Engine. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"A vibrant work. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
The leopard makes a huge drum; the Sky-God, Nyame, offers to reward the animal who can get it for him. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >