LITTLE BEAR BRUSHES HIS TEETH by Jutta Langreuter
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Sobat's warm artwork adds a comforting touch. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Little Bear Brushes His Teeth (PLB $14.90; paper $8.95; Mar. 1997; 32 pp.; PLB 0-7613-0190-9; paper 0-7613-0230-1): Little Bear is not happy about his first encounter with toothbrushes and paste: ``Blech! Read full book review >
THE SEED BUNNY by Jennifer  Selby
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"An ebullient take on an important rite of passage. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Selby (Beach Bunny, 1996) offers another affectionate and accurate portrayal of the bond between parents and preschoolers. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 1997

"The illustrated, kid-friendly instructions have no more than six steps, and the insets of the club members conversing and cavorting will engage preschoolers while parents ready work spaces for action. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Squirrel and raccoon friends Winky, Skipper, and Tag from The Make-Something Club (1994) reunite on a cold winter day for the making of 12 preschool projects, one for each month of the year. Read full book review >
ROSA MOVES TO TOWN by Barbro Lindgren
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Scary. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Rosa is a spunky dog, a veritable Hoover of the canine realm, ingesting every interesting morsel she encounters whether it is food or not. Read full book review >
THE ANIMALS' SONG by David L. Harrison
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"This book, a group of preschoolers, and a rhythm band set form a cacophonous combination with appeal that's loud and clear. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Fans of old-fashioned rhyming books will warm to this perky celebration of sight and sound: ``There was a little girl/With a silver flute,/Toot toot/Tootity toot,/Who puckered her lips/And blew her flute,/Tootity tootity toot.'' Soon she is joined by a little boy with ``a rumity drum,'' a hooty owl, a sleepy ``yippity'' dog, a cow, a pony, a rooster, a pig, bird, goose, lamb, duck, pigeon, and a shy mouse from ``under the sink.'' All together they make a crew that recalls the Bremen town musicians in a noisy, onomatopoeic parade: ``They sang and danced/And skipped along/With a flute and a drum/And the animals' song.'' The parade ends grandly; the girl who started it all is fast asleep in her sunset-drenched bedroom, her toys gathered around her. Read full book review >

TWO'S COMPANY by Shirley Greenway
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Back matter includes scientific names and a paragraph of interesting facts about each animal. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-8)"
A book of collective nouns paired with full-color photographs from Oxford Scientific Films and brief lines of text for 13 animals. Read full book review >
DROP DEAD by Babette Cole
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"Pair this with Margaret Wild's Old Pig (1996) for a fairly complete definition of aging and death—one funny, one tender—aimed at the young. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Cole (The Bad Good Manners Book, 1996, etc.) proves that she can fracture more than Emily Post in this eccentric tale subtitled ``Or how we grew from one-year-old bald wrinklies into eighty-year-old bald wrinklies.'' A question from their grandchildren—``Gran and Grandad, why are you such bald old wrinklies?''—prompts two elderly folks to recite the major events of their lives, from birth to the moment they drop dead and are then ``recycled,'' returning as two scrawny chickens. Read full book review >
THE HUNTERMAN AND THE CROCODILE by Baba Wagué Diakité
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Sources are offered in an author's note. (Picture book/folklore. 4-7)"
DiakitÇ's first book makes bold use of memories of his childhood in West Africa and of the hand-painted ceramic tiles that appear as the illustrations in this book. ``There was a time'' when the crocodile, Bamba, and his family, finding themselves hungry and exhausted en route to Mecca, ask Donso the Hunterman to return them to the river. Read full book review >
I SWIM AN OCEAN IN MY SLEEP by Norma Farber
NATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"There are nice moments in the text as well, but sometimes the perceptions of the author intrude, resulting in a narrative that wavers between the child's point of view and a more sophisticated perspective. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Farber (When It Snowed That Night, 1993, etc.) begins her sleeptime fantasy quietly: ``Night is dark,/Night is deep,/I swim an ocean in my sleep.'' In Savadier's whimsical ink and gouache illustrations, a small boy in red-striped pajamas swims through an imaginative underwater world. Read full book review >
POPPLETON by Cynthia Rylant
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Teague's scenes of a small town are charming but have no real story in which to take root, and the book is printed on cardboard-weight stock that all but overwhelms the format. (Fiction. 4-7)"
The first book in a proposed series of easy readers from the usually reliable Rylant (The Bookshop Dog, p. 1055) is an unqualified flop. Read full book review >
TROUBLE by Jane Kurtz
by Jane Kurtz, illustrated by Durga Bernhard
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1997

"An author's note discusses the story's origins; Bernhard's illustrations provide an enchanting window into the culture and people of Eritrea. (map, glossary) (Picture book/folklore. 3-7)"
From Kurtz (Miro in the Kingdom of the Sun, 1996, etc.), the lively Eritrean story of a young boy with a magnetic attraction to trouble. Read full book review >
LEON AND BOB by Simon James
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Tidy, but congenial. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Leon is new in town. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >