SNOW DANCE by Lezlie Evans
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Snowmen, sleds, snowball fights, thawing by the fire, hot chocolate time—it's a cozy litany, but Jabar is the one who livens up the static, gerund-laden text with scenes of joyous children, unusual snowmen, and a dog's antics. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A rhyming celebration of snow that covers just about every playtime activity possible before, during, and after a snowstorm. ``Pressure's falling/forecast's calling/for a snowstorm late today./`Find your warm boots/lay out snowsuits/do a snow dance and it may!' '' The territory is so familiar that it may not matter that the stanzas are often mundane and occasionally strained in their meter. Read full book review >
THE GIANT by Nicholas Heller
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The giant, sweet-faced and benign, but very large, looks suitably ready to burst off the page. (Picture book. 5-9)"
The giant in the painting in Mrs. Bell's living room is so realistic he looks ``quite ready to jump off the canvas onto Mrs. Bell's carpet.'' And that's exactly what he does. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A mediocre text comprised of tortured meter makes this no easier on readers than the forced plot, but the illustrations are full of humor in the exaggerated lines of cartoons, and in the homely details: hair curlers, puffy slippers, and Kate's omnipresent hair bow. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A nonsensical rhyming tale of an unusual Christmas adventure shows the persistence of a heartbroken little girl trying to rescue Redbird. Read full book review >
SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE DINOSAUR STOMP by Carol Diggory Shields
DINOSAURS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The illustrations match the text's exuberance with drawings of boisterously striped and polka-dotted dinosaurs, who play bongos, dance congas, and kick up their heels. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Dinosaurs get down and boogie at a Saturday all-night bash: Shields's rhymes and Nash's drawings create an extravaganza of prehistoric fun. Read full book review >
WHOEVER YOU ARE by Mem Fox
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An essential book that acknowledges in the simplest of terms our common humanity. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A one-world, "we-are-all-the-same-under-the-skin" message for the very young from Fox (The Straight Line Wonder, p. 1388, etc.). Read full book review >

THUMBELINA by Hans Christian Andersen
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Thumbelina's one claim to fame is her beauty, which readers are never allowed to forget, and Graston's illustrations, technically impressive, fail to give the tale even a breath of fresh air. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
Thumbelina (32 pp.; $16.95; Oct.; 0-385-32251-8): Graston brings new illustrations to Haugaard's 1974 translation, but neither new art nor old text holds up to contemporary scrutiny. Read full book review >
ONE SMALL LOST SHEEP by Claudia Mills
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Krudop's handsome artwork captures the mood of the story and adds mystery of its own, conveying a real sense of place in Bethlehem and its surroundings. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The setting is Bethlehem. Read full book review >
TO MARKET, TO MARKET by Anne Miranda
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"True, her kitchen's trashed and she probably won't find a welcome mat at her supermarket hereafter, but all's well that ends well—at least while the soup's on. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A marketing trip from Miranda (Glad Monster, Sad Monster, p. 1309) that jiggity jigs off in time-honored nursery-rhyme fashion, but almost immediately derails into well-charted chaos. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A splendid walk through the months. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Otten's first children's book offers one vivid short poem for every month of the year: ``February turns everything to gray,'' ``June measures time until the longest day becomes the shortest night,'' and ``September squeezes what is left of summer into night-cool cider,'' etc. Doney's gorgeous, impressionistic paintings combine perfectly with the simple resplendence of Otten's poems, using light and shadow to draw readers into the shade of a willow in April, to the apple-blossom snow of May, and to the baked heat of a July afternoon. Read full book review >
HANSEL AND GRETEL by Jane Ray
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The palette is rich and deep, the witch a startling and original figure with red eyes and a half-mask, and Hansel and Gretel appealing with their dark, knowing eyes. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
A graceful retelling of the classic tale, accompanied by brilliant, swirling, full-bleed illustrations. Read full book review >
WINTER VISITORS by Elizabeth Lee O'Donnell
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The marginal story makes clear its author has probably never been skunked, for the girl is serene only moments after the spray; the wild animals are greeting-card cuddly, poorly proportioned, and awkwardly posed. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A treacly counting book in forced rhyme. Read full book review >
GABRIELLA'S SONG by Candace Fleming
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A disarmingly simple tale, this is inspiring and transporting. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Fleming (Madame Lagrande and Her So High, To the Sky, Uproarious Pompadour, 1996) celebrates music and its power to touch our lives. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >