TANYA STEPS OUT by Patricia Lee Gauch
FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 1996

"Tutu pinks and toe-shoe pastels are balanced with the greens and beiges of the animals, and the slightly goofy expressions on the faces of the human dancers keep the whole thing from becoming fluff. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Tanya Steps Out ($13.95; Sept. 10, 1996; 10 pp.; 0-399-22936-1): French ballet terms can be daunting for children; while this book does not provide much help with pronunciations or exact translations, it compares ballet steps to animal movements. Read full book review >
TAH-TYE, THE LAST 'POSSUM IN THE POUCH by Mary Alice Fontenot
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The illustrations portray the blue and green of a swamp in moonlight. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This book's dawdling pace may leave readers wondering just who's playing 'possum: the characters in the book or the book itself. Read full book review >

WHEN CHICKENS GROW TEETH by Wendy Anderson Halperin
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"However, an overall softening of the characters' eccentricities makes this version needlessly skim over the hearty, bucolic humor for which the tale, setting, and two protagonists were created. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When a fall from a ladder leaves jolly Antoine (known as Toine) bedridden, it also puts him at the mercy of his shrewish wife. Read full book review >
KAYUKTUK by Brian Heinz
by Brian Heinz, illustrated by Jon Van Zyle
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"However, the lengthy text is dramatic; the paintings are a realistic accompaniment. (afterword, glossary) (Picture book. 5-9)"
Heinz (The Wolves, p. 1235) and Van Zyle team up for an involving glimpse of the lives of traditional I§upiat people. Read full book review >
THE WAGON by Tony Johnston
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Ransome's paintings give life to the characters and bring out the luster of the surroundings; the story is ardent and somber, a piercing lament. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Johnston (The Ghost of Nicholas Greebe, p. 824, etc.) portrays the evils of slavery through the sufferings of a boy born a slave because his skin is the color of ``smooth, dark wood.'' The boy grows up under ``the whish of the lash''—he cried at the near- fatal beating of an old man and was himself whipped, and then ``striped good'' for a desperate act of vandalism. Read full book review >

DOWN ON CASEY'S FARM by Sandra Jordan
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"At Casey's farm, the days are always summer and the light a shade of gold. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Casey's farm is in his backyard: His animal creatures are toys, a wooden box his barn. Read full book review >
WHO WAKES ROOSTER? by Clare Hodgson Meeker
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"It adds a wondrous realism to the proceedings. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Who wakes rooster? Read full book review >
TWO FOR STEW by Laura Numeroff
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"It's satisfying fare, all except for the microwave ending: Those ravenous would-be diners ignore their hunger pangs to go bowling. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Numeroff (Chimps Don't Wear Glasses, 1995, etc.) and Saltzberg (This is a Great Place for a Hot Dog Stand, 1995, etc.) have concocted a rhyming quest for stew that will elicit giggles and stimulate salivary glands. Read full book review >
MY VERY FIRST MOTHER GOOSE by Iona Opie
POETRY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"There's little point in pretending that even prodigious collections of nursery rhymes can do without this one—it's a must. (index) (Poetry. 2-8)"
My Very First Mother Goose ($19.99; Sept. 1996; 108 pp.; 1-56402- 620-5): One glimpse of the merry Wells (The Language of Doves, p. 1159, etc.) characters that caper through these pages—a cast of hundreds—one flip through the pages where Opie (I Saw Esau, 1992, etc.) has arranged almost 70 familiar and not-so-familiar rhymes to an effect of unabashed glee, and readers will be in love again with the original Mother Goose. Read full book review >
JUST REWARDS by Steve Sanfield
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Best of all, the stingy farmer's bald lunar pate provides a good forecast of his fate. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
In a folktale that bears the subtitle ``Or Who Is That Man in the Moon and What's He Doing Up There Anyway?,'' a kind farmer is rewarded for rescuing an injured bird, with a magic seed that grows into watermelons loaded with money and jewels. Read full book review >
THE RED HEELS by Robert D. San Souci
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"What an extraordinary gift for young readers: a romance that hints at the real complexity of adult love without sentimentality, coyness, or sexism. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
This original tale from San Souci (Kate Shelley, 1995, etc.), based on a colonial New England legend, makes a richly imagined and tenderly evocative love story. Read full book review >
THE WINDIGO'S RETURN by Douglas Wood
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Couch's hazy style of illustration portrays the north woods as a setting where possibility always lurks in the mist, a perfect place for tales to grow. (pronunciation guide) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Wood (Northwoods Cradle Song, p. 302, etc.) has wisely chosen to adapt a Windigo tale that explains nature, rather than one that induces nightmares (the Windigo figures in north woods tales as everything from a monster to a symbol of men driven wild by the wilderness itself; tales about them make for classic ``ghost stories'' for around the campfire) for this book. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >