WHO CAME DOWN THAT ROAD? by George Ella Lyon
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"A lovely, beautifully crafted book that makes an unusually effective response to a prototypical question. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A mother and child look at a path near their home, ``Just a trace through the woods'' but one that's long been traveled. Read full book review >
WHEN CATS DREAM by Dav Pilkey
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Pilkey's simple text suggests the dream adventures' liberating quality, splendidly realized in his glowing, beautifully designed paintings; handsome in themselves, they also make a unique introduction to modern art's ideas and images. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An imaginative exploration of the world of dream. ``When cats are awake, all the world is the same''—predictable and, in neatly framed black and white, realistic. Read full book review >

ANNIE...ANYA by Irene  Trivas
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Trivas's pen-and-watercolor art nicely captures the city's ambiance and the children's lively activity. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Annie is five when her doctor parents take her to Moscow, where they are to work for a month. Read full book review >
PEOPLE, PEOPLE, EVERYWHERE! by Nancy van Laan
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Point made, gently but effectively. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Frenetic verse sums up a city's activity: ``People racing round the town,/Going up!/Going down!''—running for the bus, dashing to walk the dog, crowding around vendors, building ever- taller buildings, working, parading, even tangling clotheslines that run between buildings. Read full book review >
SOAP SOUP by Karla Kuskin
POETRY
Released: June 30, 1992

"The cheerfully unassuming illustrations, often interspersed with the words, make a perfect complement. (Poetry/Easy reader. 4-8)"
``Ice and cream./Sleep and dream./Some words seem/to go together,'' remarks Kuskin early in this casual-seeming but carefully crafted cycle of verses, whose ideas move as smoothly from one to the next as the ``Wind and weather'' on the first page. Read full book review >

NUMBERS AT PLAY by Charles Sullivan
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 18, 1992

"Full citations to the art, with brief but informative comments on the artists. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
In a counting-book companion to Sullivan's Alphabet Animals (1991), the numbers up to 10 as seen in works of art. Read full book review >
JUNE IS A TUNE THAT JUMPS ON A STAIR by Sarah Wilson
POETRY
Released: June 10, 1992

"Nice. (Poetry/Picture book. 2-7)"
``It's a day for a cone,/for a plum/or a peach,/a warm- spoony day/for a run/on the beach,/where a ball/hits the clouds,/where the sky tips/the sea,/where we jump/for the water,/one, two, three!'' Thirty-one childlike poems about everyday things—weather, growing, seasons, night—as lighthearted and easily accessible as the author's illustrations of merry tots and their animal friends. Read full book review >
ANTICS! by Cathi Hepworth
ABC BOOKS
Released: June 3, 1992

"A delightful vocabulary expander. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Not truly an anthology—though the pun is forgivable—but an alphabet of words with the syllable ``ant'' (``Brilliant,'' ``Immigrants,'' ``Rembrandt,'' ``Xanthophile''), accompanied by imaginatively conceived ant characters: a slim, armored ``Gallant'' bowing to his monarch; ``Kant'' with pen and quizzically furrowed brow; a giant ``Mutant'' menacing an anteater; an ``Observant'' sleuth. Read full book review >
THE OLD MAN AND THE FIDDLE by Michael McCurdy
FICTION
Released: June 3, 1992

"As a cautionary tale, the point seems belabored, though McCurdy's sprightly verse is imaginatively phrased; best are his lively illustrations with their angular human and animal characters, the dramatic black of the engraving tinted with softer color. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An accomplished wood engraver adopts the form and scenario of ``The Arkansas Traveler,'' writing a mostly new ballad with a more complicated plot: not only does the man's roof leak, but ``His house was a shambles, the porch almost gone,/The yard was a sight, but the man fiddled on.'' Several neighbors, amusingly depicted in McCurdy's vigorous art, protest and try to help, but in the end it takes a flood to tidy up—a flood that takes the old man with it but fails to quench his spirit: on the last page, he's glimpsed fiddling from ``beyond the next hill'' (apparently the next life). Read full book review >
THE SIMPLE PEOPLE by Tedd Arnold
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Simplistic and heavy-handed, but in the spirit of real contemporary concerns—a book that could contribute to thoughtful discussion. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The ``simple people''—depicted in Shachat's glowing mixed- media art as adult males whose pink, almost hairless heads constitute more than half their bulk—live happily, singing songs and eating fruit, until a serpent intrudes in the form of a first invention: Node makes a frame to look through. Read full book review >
BOOTS AND THE GLASS MOUNTAIN by Claire Martin
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 1992

"This Cinderella variant doesn't really need such a lush setting, but many will enjoy it. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A restructuring of Asbjornsen and Moe's ``The Princess on the Glass Hill.'' Martin modernizes the language, prunes descriptions and repetitions, and adds unnecessary explanations, a romantic source for Boots's tinderbox, and the threat of a troll groom if the princess's suitors fail. Read full book review >
RED FOX ON THE MOVE by Hannah Giffard
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1992

"As in Red Fox (1991), a slight plot is distinguished by well-designed, stylized illustrations in pleasing, bright colors. (Picture book. 3-7)"
After a bulldozer rousts Red Fox and his family from their home, they swim a river, brave a train tunnel, and try holes occupied by several other creatures before happening on one that is available for them to settle in. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >