WHAT AM I? by Debbie MacKinnon
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"This team makes child's play of going to work. (Picture book. 1-5)"
From the creators of What Size? (p. 388), a catalog of role models guaranteed to have preschoolers begging for rereadings. Read full book review >
WHAT DO THE FAIRIES DO WITH ALL THOSE TEETH? by Michel Luppens
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1996

"The premise suits children's sensibilities perfectly, but its execution lacks bite. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A picture book manquÇ, consisting of hypothetical answers to the question posed by the title: Do fairies choose the sharpest teeth to make their saws? Read full book review >

WHAT DO YOU HEAR WHEN COWS SING? by Marco Maestro
HUMOR
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"A great addition to the venerable I Can Read series. (Picture book. 4-8)"
``Moosic'' is the answer to the question in the title, perfectly reflecting the goofy tone of this worthy sequel to the father-and-son team's first book of riddles, Riddle City, USA! (1994). Read full book review >
HOORAY! IT'S PASSOVER! by Leslie Kimmelman
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"Utilitarian. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Add this offering to the growing stack of books whose sole function is to teach the very young the lessons of Passover. Read full book review >
HOW DO BIRDS FIND THEIR WAY? by Roma Gans
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"A solid introduction to a fascinating topic and a welcome addition to the series. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
This entry in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out series asks plenty of questions in a brief, lucid text, urging readers to think about what happens to birds in winter—how they return to their nesting grounds year after year across continents and oceans, and how they navigate by day, at night, and in fog. Read full book review >

EAGLE BOY by Gerald Hausman
adapted by Gerald Hausman, illustrated by Barry Moser
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"Most of the pages, filled with big cloudy expanses, serve as background for the text. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
A wonderful and unique Navajo legend from the trio behind Turtle Island ABC (1994, not reviewed) about the first boy to learn the ways of the eagles. Read full book review >
ART DOG by Thacher Hurd
by Thacher Hurd, illustrated by Thacher Hurd
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"Hurd (Tomato Soup, 1992, etc.) employs a disarming, deliberately slapdash style, blazing a trail of scrawled charm across the streets and skies of Gotham; Art Dog is a superhero for all times. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The adventures of Arthur Dog—mild-mannered guard at the Dogopolis Museum of Art by day, mural-painting superhero by night- -who is mistakenly apprehended when the Mona Woofa is stolen from the museum; he paints his way out of prison and succeeds in catching the crooks in his improvised Brushmobile. Read full book review >
GREAT-UNCLE ALFRED FORGETS by Ben Shecter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"They fairly radiate with the affection between these two characters as they struggle to communicate. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fragmentary conversation between Emily and Great-Uncle Alfred, who is increasingly forgetful; his questions and statements are sometimes funny, sometimes lyrical, sometimes philosophical, and sometimes saggy—the dialogue is a little too realistic in its stops and starts. Read full book review >
TEMPLE CAT by Andrew Clements
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 20, 1996

"Kiesler, working in an utterly realistic style, employs a subtle visual shift in characterization as the protagonist transforms from a religious icon to an ordinary house cat. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Clements (Who Owns the Cow?, p. 944, etc.) pens a tale for consummate cat enthusiasts or lovers of antiquity: a feline's not- too-arduous search for love. Read full book review >
DEAR OLD DONEGAL by Steve Graham
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Feb. 20, 1996

"The full song appears on the endpapers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A flat, unimaginative book based on a tune made popular by Bing Crosby and best known for its chorus of rhyming Irish names: ``Meet Branigan, Fannigan, Milligan, Gilligan, Duffy, McCuffy,'' etc. O'Brien (The Twelve Days of Christmas, 1993, not reviewed, etc.) follows a lad out of Cork who rises from street-singing urchin (where improbably, a woman drops dollars in his box) to concert hall tenor with his name up in lights. Read full book review >
GOOD NIGHT, DINOSAURS by Judy Sierra
POETRY
Released: Feb. 20, 1996

"Each page has a handsome yellow border, framing the text on one page and the picture on the other, snugging the book like a baby's blanket. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A tongue-in-cheek lullaby book of small good-night poems for dinosaurs. ``Three tyrannosaurus rexes/Once lay dreaming of their breakfasts/In what's now the state of Texas.'' Sierra (Nursery Tales Around the World, 1995, etc.) uses comic neologisms (tyrannograndma and scaredysauruses among them) and ends every poem with a gentle refrain. Read full book review >
BUCKLEY AND WILBERTA by Hope Slaughter
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 15, 1996

"Slaughter (Windmill Hill, 1993, not reviewed, etc.) provides a text that is all heart; Torrence's full-color and black-and-white drawings capture the friendship just as affectionately. (Fiction. 5-7)"
There may be better friends than Buckley and Wilberta—the hippos George and Martha come to mind—but he, a small hedgehog, has a devotion to her, a slender rabbit, that is truly endearing. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >