PETEY'S BEDTIME STORY by Beverly Cleary
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A funny story that can easily be elaborated on by those who want to tell their children more; Small's energetic, cartoony art is a perfect match for Cleary's witty prose. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Obstreperous Petey is indulged with a full bedtime ritual: splashy bath, all-out chase, book from each parent, monster check; last comes the "baby story," the already-familiar tale of his own birth ("One night Mommy painted her toenails so they would look pretty when she met the baby..."), with Petey's own embellishments (daddy "drove off in the dark a hundred miles an hour," but after a policeman stops him he's more cautious—he doesn't want to miss football on TV). Read full book review >
MARY MALLOY AND THE BABY WHO WOULDN'T SLEEP by Niki Daly
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Wynken, Blinken and Nod'' descendant. (Picture book. 4-7)"
When sleepy Mary Malloy picks up the wakeful baby, ``Baby hullabalooed until the Crescent Moon pushed aside her cloudy curtains and smiled mysteriously down'' and asked to rock him. Read full book review >

THE MOUSE BRIDE by Judith Dupré
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A particularly felicitous presentation of a satisfying tale. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-9)"
There have been several editions of this tale of proud parents who, wanting the mightiest husband for their perfect daughter, go to moon, sun, cloud, wind, and a wall—each in some way stronger than the one before—before settling on another mouse: when he burrows, even the massive wall crumbles. Read full book review >
THE WIZARD NEXT DOOR by Peter Glassman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Lightweight, but fun. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Only the narrator recognizes Mr. Myers as a wizard; only he can see that the new neighbor is not grilling hot dogs but cooking up a magic potion, that he has huge, fantastic pets, can summon up a tornado to rid himself of unwelcome visitors, and—as substitute teacher—presides over a wonderfully magical day. Read full book review >
REUBEN AND THE FIRE by Merle Good
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An attractive glimpse of Amish culture at its most traditional. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An episodic story—contrived to showcase an illustrator whose art frequently features the Amish—about a little boy who's tired of being bossed by his many sisters, enjoys the animals on the family farm, and witnesses a barn burning and the community barn raising that follows. Read full book review >

NEW SHOES FOR SILVIA by Johanna Hurwitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Just right. (Picture book. 3-8)"
"Far away in another America," little Silvia receives a treasured gift from Tia Rosita (who's in the US)—fine red shoes, too big for her to wear. Read full book review >
PEARL MOSCOWITZ'S LAST STAND by Arthur A. Levine
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Pair this happy tale with Polacco's Mrs. Katz and Tush (1992). (Picture book. 4-9)"
America as it should be, and sometimes is: Pearl remembers Gingko Street's earlier name—Smith Street—and the planting of its gingko trees at her mother's instigation; she's seen waves of new neighbors with names like Lincoln and Jefferson, Pi§a and Diego, Chen and Kee. Read full book review >
OLD DEVIL WIND by Bill Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Root's dark, swirling paintings of the thoroughly haunted house, lit with a ghostly glow, are right in the proper spirit. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A nicely spooky cumulative Halloween tale that begins: ``One dark and stormy night Ghost floated out of the wall and he began to WAIL. Read full book review >
THE PRINCE WHO WROTE A LETTER by Ann Love
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"The familiar scenario is developed with logic and a brisk good humor; Goffe's well-designed illustrations and broad caricatures make an entertaining complement. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When the King asks little Prince Paul about his first day of school, Paul says, ``I had to write a letter.'' Pleased, the King tells the Queen, surmising that the letter must have been to Paul's pal Prince Peter, across the valley. Read full book review >
A IS FOR AFRICA by Ifeoma Onyefulu
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Visually appealing, but simplistic. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A London-based photographer offers images of traditional life and culture in her Nigerian homeland. Read full book review >
THE DRAGONS ARE SINGING TONIGHT by Jack Prelutsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A must for dragon fanciers and for all those who enjoy light verse. (Poetry/Picture book. 4-10)"
Eighteen deftly fashioned verses in the trademark Prelutsky style, with catchy rhythms, clever rhymes, and witty wordplay and conceits (``If you don't believe in dragons,/It is curiously true/That the dragons you disparage/Choose to not believe in you''). Read full book review >
SPACES by Peter Parnall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"At his best, Parnell collaborates with the reader to create a drama in a setting that has an integrity built from page to page; here—disappointingly—he just suggests that readers add whatever occurs to them. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It could have been a good idea. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >