UMBRELLA by Taro Yashima
Released: March 1, 1958

"The pictures are full of the city's moods and the child's joy in a rainy day."
Momo longed to carry the blue umbrella and wear the bright red rubber boots she had been given on her third birthday. Read full book review >
ANATOLE by Eve Titus
Kirkus Star
by Eve Titus, illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 1, 1956

"But the circumstances under which he carries out his project—to live up to his social responsibilities—have an unmistakable French savoir faire."
The logical thing for a mouse, especially a French one, to do is to taste cheese—as Anatole does. Read full book review >

A TREE IS NICE by Janice May Udry
Released: June 15, 1956

"Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item."
A nursery school approach to a general concept. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE PAWPAW TREES by Palmer Brown
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >