THE DAY JIMMY'S BOA ATE THE WASH by Trinka Hakes Noble
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 28, 1981

"Those who respond to this sort of whipped-up frenzy can trust Kellogg's clever twists to keep the action from flagging."
A chaotic class trip to the farm is pictured with Kellogg's usual delight in disorder and related backwards, as it were, by a child whose report to her mother gets wilder and wilder as it unwinds: " 'Why were [the pigs] eating your lunches?' 'Because we threw their corn at each other, and they didn't have anything else to eat.'...'What was Jimmy's pet boa constrictor doing on the farm?' 'Oh, he brought it to meet all the farm animals, but the chickens didn't like it.'..." Read full book review >
THE MYSTERIOUS TADPOLE by Steven Kellogg
Released: Oct. 1, 1977

"A stock situation, right up to the enormous egg that arrives for Louis' next birthday—but Kellogg's zesty embellishments propel it along."
Kellogg tosses off one fantasy within another, as Alphonse, the tadpole Louis' Scottish uncle sends him for his birthday, develops into something more like a dinosaur than a frog and the authorities refuse to allow Louis to keep his pet in the junior high school swimming pool. Read full book review >

IT COULD ALWAYS BE WORSE by Margot Zemach
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 1977

"The more you look at Zemach's pages the more commotion there is to notice. And it's a good story, worth repeating."
Remember the "poor unfortunate man" who feels crowded with his mother, wife, and six children in a little one-room hut—until the Rabbi instructs him to bring his chickens, goat, and cow inside as well? Read full book review >
THE TYGER VOYAGE by Richard Adams
Released: Sept. 1, 1976

"There's not a snag or a hint of strain in Adams' old-style verse and tongue-in-cheek decorum, but we found the whole performance as inconsequential as it is impeccable."
Though their spoofy intent doesn't entirely redeem the stultifying preciosity of Bayley's fussy Victorian interiors and surreal landscapes, the paintings do complement Adams' mock-heroic rhymed tale of the human narrator's "tyger" neighbors, Ezekiel and Raphael Dubb. Read full book review >
Released: June 1, 1972

"If Alexander's mother is smart to offer casual sympathy without phoney consolation, Cruz and Viorst accord readers the same respect."
In the spiky spirit of Sunday Morning (1969) but more truly attuned to a child's point of view, Viorst reviews a really aggravating (if not terrible, horrible, and very bad) day in the life of a properly disgruntled kid who wakes up with gum in his hair and goes to bed after enduring lima beans for dinner and kissing on T.V. Read full book review >

UMBRELLA by Taro Yashima
Released: March 1, 1958

"The pictures are full of the city's moods and the child's joy in a rainy day."
Momo longed to carry the blue umbrella and wear the bright red rubber boots she had been given on her third birthday. Read full book review >
ANATOLE by Eve Titus
Kirkus Star
by Eve Titus, illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 1, 1956

"But the circumstances under which he carries out his project—to live up to his social responsibilities—have an unmistakable French savoir faire."
The logical thing for a mouse, especially a French one, to do is to taste cheese—as Anatole does. Read full book review >
A TREE IS NICE by Janice May Udry
Released: June 15, 1956

"Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item."
A nursery school approach to a general concept. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE PAWPAW TREES by Palmer Brown
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >