HOW TO PUT YOUR PARENTS TO BED by Mylisa Larsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This bedtime book is good for some laughs—even though it feels a bit tired. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Role reversal finds a little girl trying to put her parents to bed. Read full book review >
PUNK SKUNKS by Trisha Speed Shaskan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Not a stinker, but no hit record either. (Picture book. 4-6)"
BSFs, best skunks forever! Maybe…. Read full book review >

TREE by Britta Teckentrup
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This unassuming story is an intergenerational delight. (Picture book. 3-10)"
Like the stealthy spider quietly spinning its web on a low bough, life around and on the apple tree is never static. Read full book review >
IT'S NOT EASY BEING NUMBER THREE by Drew Dernavich
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An acclaimed cartoonist in the adult world has created a solid hit for children. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When Number Three feels bored with being a number, he seeks other uses for his highly distinguishable shape. Read full book review >
I'M NOT HATCHING by Laura Gehl
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Delightful and right on target. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Egg will not hatch in spite of all the fun things he could do with Peep. What will it take to get him to hatch? Read full book review >

ONE BIG FAMILY by Marc Harshman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 8, 2016

"Though joyful, this celebration of the American family is regrettably nostalgic. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Poet Laureate of West Virginia Harshman's anthem to extended families is a mellow catalog of togetherness. Read full book review >
COLORS by Aino-Maija Metsola
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"Unlike its companion, Colors is a conceptual and visual winner. (Board book. 2-4)"
A bold, colorful, and playful board book introduce colors, while its companion addresses the numbers one to 10. Read full book review >
WHO IS HAPPY? by Jarvis
by Jarvis, illustrated by Jarvis
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"Despite flaws, valuable practice at a crucial skill. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Young children get plenty of practice identifying 12 key emotions in this interactive question-and-answer book. Read full book review >
MARGUERITE'S FOUNTAIN by Rachel Elliot
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"A classic, traditional tale of heroine, villain, and hero—perhaps too traditional. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In this British picture-book melodrama, a dancing mouse named Marguerite is bullied by the rat Randolph and eventually rescued by the shy but heroic mouse Benjamin. Read full book review >
THE WONDERFUL HABITS OF RABBITS by Douglas Florian
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Small and friendly. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Florian's whimsical poem is set against a plethora, indeed a veritable multitude, of rabbits. Read full book review >
SNAPPSY THE ALLIGATOR (DID NOT ASK TO BE IN THIS BOOK) by Julie Falatko
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"More than merely meta, Snappsy is clearly a book, if not a protagonist, with bite. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Picture Rita Skeeter as a chicken for a general sense of this book's goofy take on intrusive narration and one-sided reporting. Read full book review >
LITTLE BITTY FRIENDS by Elizabeth McPike
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Is this a nature book? Not really. But with beautiful young faces respecting living creatures, it is a great choice for toddler libraries. (Picture book. 1-3)"
With expressions of wonder and delight, little toddlers explore nature in its tiniest forms, seeing critters and flowers with the curiosity of new eyes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >