FIONA'S LITTLE LIE by Rosemary Wells
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A gently humorous take on being honest and learning to admit when you're wrong. (Picture book. 4-7)"
How can you un-tell a lie? Read full book review >
PANDA PANTS by Jacqueline Davies
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"There's nothing too scary, no message to navigate—just a sweet story, well done. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A little panda has decided that he wants pants, and he's going to tell his father exactly why. Read full book review >

HANK'S BIG DAY by Evan Kuhlman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Excellent layout, text, and illustrations make for a thoroughly satisfying story. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Pill bug Hank's day moves from ordinary to extraordinary when Amelia, a dark-skinned girl with huge eyes and black braids, gives him a ride on her pilot's helmet. Read full book review >
NINJA BUNNY by Jennifer Gray Olson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Funny and full of motion. (Picture book. 3-6)"
You never know when an extra ninja will come in handy. Read full book review >
TOBY by Hazel Mitchell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Toby is a pleasing pup, but his story doesn't stand out from the crowded pack of dog tales. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-7)"
A timid rescue dog learns to get along with his new owners, a lonely boy and his single dad. Read full book review >

THE WATER PRINCESS by Susan Verde
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Though told by two outsiders to the culture, this timely and well-crafted story will educate readers on the preciousness of potable water. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An international story which tackles a serious global issue with Reynolds' characteristic visual whimsy. Read full book review >
EAT, SLEEP, POOP by Alexandra Penfold
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Eat, sleep, poop, read. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A baby's gotta do what a baby's gotta do. Read full book review >
HOME AT LAST by Vera B.  Williams
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A book to welcome into all kinds of homes. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Williams' heartfelt text, published posthumously, supports Raschka's expressive illustrations to tell the story of a child adopted by two dads. Read full book review >
HOW TO BUILD A SNOW BEAR by Eric Pinder
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A pleasant choice for a cozy read though not quite as sweet as the characters' first outing. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Bear and brother, introduced in How to Share with a Bear (2015), are back. Read full book review >
LEAVE ME ALONE by Vera Brosgol
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Understatedly funny, just like the Eastern European folk tales on whose shoulders it stands. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Knitters will find their niches and click their needles—wherever. Read full book review >
DID YOU EVER SEE? by Joanna Walsh
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Science books for the young can and should do better than this. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This new offering from the Tate Gallery's publishing arm asks simple questions about visual perception, challenging readers to make judgments about relationships between familiar objects. Read full book review >
UNDERCOVER by Bastien Contraire
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 12, 2016

"Slow down and look! (Picture book. 3-6)"
A picture-book invitation to look carefully and observe. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >