THE FLYING HAND OF MARCO B. by Richard Leiter
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Little listeners will be hoping their hands will take flight on their next road trips. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Just how high can a wayward hand fly? Read full book review >
SHABBAT SHALOM, HEY! by Ann D. Koffsky
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Charming and joyous but not for the uninitiated. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Preparing for the Friday night Shabbat ceremony and meal is a joyous expression of faith and tradition. Read full book review >

TIME TO BUILD by Kate Riggs
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"This sturdy introduction to some basic construction equipment also highlights the value of cooperation, giving it wide appeal. (Board book. 2-4)"
A simple introduction to the functions of some basic tools: tape measure, saw, wrench, drill, screwdriver, and hammer. Read full book review >
FISHFISHFISH by Lee Nordling
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"A peaceful meditation that should delight readers with its multiplicity of composition. (Graphic adventure. 4-8)"
Fish—big, small and many—visually tell their tales as three underwater adventures converge in a cleverly developed wordless graphic format. Read full book review >
HOPPELPOPP AND THE BEST BUNNY by Mira Lobe
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"At best an incomplete discussion starter, without much political or psychological depth. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A pointed fable on the hazards of competition and the benefits of cooperation. Read full book review >

CRINKLE, CRACKLE, CRACK by Marion Dane Bauer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"A new perspective on the 'arrival of spring' theme best suited to blond, pink-skinned readers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Bauer's imaginative first-person romp puts (some) readers right into the story, inviting them to journey with the animals in the moonlight to welcome spring. Read full book review >
THE BUS IS FOR US by Michael Rosen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"A lovely treatment of a perennially popular topic. (Picture book. 2-5) "
There are so many ways to ride; some are flights of imagination. Read full book review >
SCHOOL DAYS AROUND THE WORLD by Margriet Ruurs
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"The picture-book equivalent of 'It's a Small World.' (Picture book. 3-8)"
Third in a series of informational picture books for preschoolers and early-elementary readers about children around the world (Families Around the World, 2014, etc.). Read full book review >
OCTOPUSES! by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Pringle inks another winner in a long series of engaging, informative invitations to explore the natural world. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
A veteran science writer introduces the most intelligent invertebrate of all, the octopus, master of camouflage. Read full book review >
EAT, LEO! EAT! by Caroline Adderson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Food, family, stories: delizioso! (glossary) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Nonna's tales about the stelline, chiancaredde and other shapes of pasta she serves entice a reluctant ragazzo to the dinner table.Read full book review >
MY FAMILY TREE AND ME by Dusan Petricic
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Budding genealogists will enjoy poring over this illustrated family history. (Picture book. 4-9)"
This dos-à-dos book looks at both sides of one little boy's ancestry. Read full book review >
LEAFLETS THREE, LET IT BE! by Anita Sanchez
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"While most readers won't become cheerleaders for poison ivy, they will at least come away with a greater understanding of its importance and an increased ability to identify it. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Sanchez introduces a new perspective on this potentially itch-causing plant: Poison ivy plays a vital role in providing food for forest animals throughout the year, especially at times when other food is scarce. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >