BABY BABOON by Mwenye Hadithi
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

With the artless-seeming economy of a folktale, another fine readaloud from the creators of Crafty Chameleon, etc.: an original tale combining pourquoi and trickster motifs. Read full book review >
GIVING by Shirley Hughes
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1993

"Endpaper vignettes introduce additional verbs; a companion title, Bouncing (ISBN 1-56402-128-9) follows the same tots through a merrily rambunctious day. (Picture book. 2-6)"
If childhood has an illustrator laureate, it must be Hughes: no one else captures emotions, concerns, and body language with such sensibility and affection. Read full book review >

THE UP AND DOWN SPRING by Johanna Hurwitz
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Rory, Derek, and Bolivia (The Hot & Cold Summer, 1984, etc.) are back; now the Woodside, N.J., boys are visiting Bolivia in Ithaca, N.Y., where they must adjust to her unusual household (exotic food, no TV) and her full spring-vacation agenda, including (to Rory's disgust) attending a ballet. Read full book review >
STOPPING FOR A SPELL by Diana Wynne Jones
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8- 12)"
Three stories, each with several chapters, whose remarkable comic events turn on magic. Read full book review >
THE THREE LEGGED CAT by Margaret Mahy
Released: May 1, 1993

"Allen's cheerfully bug-eyed characters, plenty big and bold enough to share with a group, wonderfully extend the merriment. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The premise may be slight, but the witty Mahy makes use of it with her usual panache. Read full book review >

COMPOST CRITTERS by Bianca Lavies
NATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"Still, a fine offering that splendidly conveys the fecundity of the homely household heap, implicitly suggesting that nature's wonderful diversity is not only found in the jungle: it can also be encouraged in any backyard. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
With each handsome book since Lily Pad Pond (1989), this gifted former National Geographic photographer comes up with a stronger, more significant text. Read full book review >
HUE BOY by Rita Phillips Mitchell
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Like Hoffman's Amazing Grace (also illustrated by Binch, 1991), an extraordinarily warm portrait of a black child with a strongly positive self-image. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In her first book, a native of Belize depicts a happy, well- adjusted boy with only one problem: in his village, his small size is ``big news.'' Mama urges him to eat; Gran gives him big clothes to grow into; a neighbor suggests stretching exercises; the ``wisest man,'' the doctor, and the healer are consulted, but, still, Hue Boy doesn't grow ``at all, at all.'' But when tall papa, who's been away on the ship where he works, finally comes home, he doesn't even mention Hue Boy's size—and then Hue Boy ``walked tall, with his head held high...And he didn't feel small at all, at all.'' The simple, engaging story conveys its message quietly, but effectively. Read full book review >
GARTH PIG STEALS THE SHOW by Mary Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Told with Rayner's usual brisk good humor and nicely illustrated with deftly drawn, lively, and cheerfully resourceful pigs: a funny story with just enough suspense, sure to star with groups and independent readers alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A welcome return for little Garth and his big family; here, they've formed a band and are in concert with the help of a ringer, a lavender-gowned sousaphonist easily recognized (though not by the Pigs) as a wolf. Read full book review >
ARCTIC SPRING by Sue Vyner
by Sue Vyner, illustrated by Tim Vyner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

Several animals (arctic hare, arctic fox, ringed seals, narwhal, some unidentified birds) begin their spring cycles of activity. Read full book review >
BELINDA by Pamela Allen
by Pamela Allen, illustrated by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Australian; perfect to share with a group. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Bessie milks Belinda every day, while Old Tom grows vegetables; but when Bessie goes to visit her daughter, Old Tom is to do the milking. ``There's a good girl,'' he croons, whereupon Belinda declares her intentions with ``one almighty kick.'' She's faster than he is, and also smart enough to snatch the carrot he offers before escaping. Read full book review >
BIG BIRDS by Denise Casey
by Denise Casey, photographed by Gilmore
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Almost 40 species appear in this attractive overview of ``the world's biggest flying animals,'' which begins with a succinct look at the birds' varied conformations and habitats and the effects of large size on their adaptations and abilities- -since, paradoxically, flight requires both light weight and ``strong muscles, which can be quite heavy,'' each species represents some kind of evolutionary compromise. Read full book review >
E I E I O by Gus Clarke
adapted by Gus Clarke, illustrated by Gus Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Good fun. (Folklore/Picture book. 2-7)"
Any new edition of ``Old MacDonald'' needs a compelling novelty to justify its existence; here, the author-illustrator of Eddie and Teddy (1991) comes up with an elaborate scheme of incorporating the animals' ``quacks,'' ``moos,'' etc., in cartoon-style balloons that are cleverly integrated into the text on the verso pages where they are first introduced; on the rectos, the animals assemble in their increasing numbers to issue a comical cacophony for new readers to sort out. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >