LOVE LETTERS by Arnold Adoff
POETRY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Every spread stands alone, a vignette of immeasurable emotion. (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)"
A collection of love poems spoken in the distinct voice of a sibling, schoolmate, student, playmate, secret admirer, and even the self. Read full book review >
THE EGG AND I by Sylvie Chausse
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Chausse delivers her sly message with wit, while Crozat's illustrations infuse the characters with personality. (Picture book. 5-9)"
There is a wicked and clever little twist that sets this story above the mainstream of cautionary tales. Read full book review >

CARLOS AND LITTLE WOLF by Lesley Harker
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 15, 1996

"White scratchboard outlines and delicately colored watercolor washes fluidly complement the text. (Fiction. 4-7)"
As Carlos waits for his pomegranates to get big enough to eat, Little Wolf waits for himself to get big enough to eat Carlos. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 15, 1996

"Their families are also presented in a generous light, making this a heartwarming and unexpectedly fascinating book. (further reading) (Picture book. 7-10)"
The Birdseyes, subtitling their book ``Kids Talk about Faith,'' offer the religious beliefs and other interests of six students from Corvallis, Oregon, in short, first-person essays, along with Crum's full-color, snapshot-like photographs from the youngsters' daily lives. Read full book review >
THE REALLY AMAZING ANIMAL BOOK by Dawn Sirett
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 12, 1996

"Glib and messy. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-7)"
The Really Amazing Animal Book ($9.95; Dec. 12, 1996; 16 pp.; 0- 7894-1265-9): A really amazingly cluttered animal book of photographs and goofy drawings, accompanied by a goggle-eyed rubber alligator-cum-host, who asks questions that are answered (sort of) in double-page spreads. Read full book review >

LITTLE BIG EARS by Cynthia Moss
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"As is true of Ely, readers will have to work for their reward: a triumphant story of an elephant's survival against the odds. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-10)"
Subtitled ``The Story of Ely,'' this book takes a look at the first year of life for a physically challenged African elephant—also the subject of PBS documentaries—born in Amboseli National Park in Kenya. Read full book review >
THE GHOST BY THE SEA by Eileen Dunlop
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Some heavy-handed foreshadowing—extraneous in a plot that gallops along as this one does—mars the story; otherwise, this is a real winner in the spook sweepstakes. (Fiction. 8-14)"
When Robin, 10, is sent to live with her grandmother while her critically injured brother is in the hospital, she soon finds that Granny's house, Culaloe, has a mysterious history. Read full book review >
PABLO PICASSO by Matthew Meadows
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"A solid overview that makes the artist surprisingly approachable. (maps, chronology, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
Pablo Picasso ($14.95; Dec. 1996; 32 pp.; 0-8069-6160-0): Meadows invites readers to pore over large full-color reproductions of Picasso's work in this entry in the Art for Young People series. Read full book review >
THE SQUIGGLE by Carole Lexa Schaefer
FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Schaefer (In the Children's Garden, 1994, etc.) strives a bit too hard in the sound effects, but for the right performer, this could be a fabulous read-aloud. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Splendid, vibrant illustrations exhibiting a Chinese influence dance through this tribute to the imagination of one small girl. Read full book review >
ASTRONAUTS ARE SLEEPING by Natalie Standiford
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"While there is plenty to think about in these pages, the tone is calm, making this a delightful space-age lullaby to help ship listeners off to sleep. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This prose poem journey through outer space, with sumptuous pastel illustrations, serves as a smart introduction to the heavenly reaches. Read full book review >
A NET TO CATCH TIME by Sara Harrell Banks
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"The names for the times of day are inherently fascinating, as are the many details of Gullah life and lore, but they lose much of their power and intrigue when shoehorned into this story. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A day in the life of young Cuffy, the son of a fisherman on a barrier island off Georgia, set to a Gullah ``calendar,'' which, Banks notes in an afterword, she found ``oddly beautiful.'' Before Cuffy's story starts, there is a glossary, followed by Cook's sweet watercolor rendition of the diurnal calendar, to be read clockwise, showing the lyrical Gullah names for the times of day: ``Sooner Mornin','' or just before dawn, ``First Fowl Crow,'' ``Day Clean,'' when dawn breaks, and on through ``Plat-Eye Prowl,'' when nocturnal animals awaken, and ``Hag-Hollerin' Time,'' after midnight. Read full book review >
FATIMA AND THE DREAM THIEF by Rafik Schami
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"A visual treat with a gutsy heroine at its center. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The wealthy lord of a castle strikes a peculiar deal with a desperately poor boy, Hassan. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >