A VISIT TO THE BIG HOUSE by Oliver Butterworth
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1993

"Avishai's soberly realistic drawings are warm and sympathetic. (Fiction/Young Reader. 7-10)"
Rose (7) and Willie (5) are apprehensive: Dad has been in prison for a month, and Mom is taking them to see him for the first time. Read full book review >
THE TWELVE CIRCUS RINGS by Seymour Chwast
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Ingeniously constructed and designed with panache: a delightful addition to the genre. (Picture book. 3-9)"
The graphic designer who created The Alphabet Parade (1991) returns with an even more ebullient counting book patterned on ``The Twelve Days of Christmas'': ``In the fifth circus ring, my sister saw with me five dogs a-barking, four aerialists zooming, three monkeys playing, two elephants, and a daredevil on a high wire''—and so on, each spread exhibiting, for each of the numerals, new acts and performers, all of whom the reader is challenged to add up, variously, at the end. Read full book review >

MY NAME IS BRAIN/BRIAN by Jeanne Betancourt
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Packaged with earnest intent and a somewhat pat outcome, but still a skillfully structured, entertaining story; Brian himself, struggling to redefine himself in terms of his newly discovered potential, is drawn with real insight. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Brian starts school hoping to do better this year, only to mess up by misspelling his own name the first day. Read full book review >
SPIDERS NEAR AND FAR by Jennifer Owings Dewey
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Twenty-three species, in soft color-pencil drawings and an informative text describing anatomy, life cycle, and habits. Read full book review >
NEVE SHALOM/WAHAT-AL-SALAM: OASIS OF PEACE by Laurie Dolphin
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Glossary; comparison of words common to Hebrew and Arabic. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
In a remarkable community outside Jerusalem, 20 families—Jews and Arabs—demonstrate the possibility of peaceful coexistence, working and living together in a cooperative village that is seen here through the eyes of two ten-year-olds, a Jewish boy and an Arab, among the first from outside the village to be admitted to its bilingual, bicultural school. Read full book review >

PETEY AND MISS MAGIC by N.B. Dorman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"The same could be said of this book. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Petey's a grade-school charmer who so aches for a pet that he even considers, briefly, adopting the weevils that have infested his mother's cornmeal. Read full book review >
THE NAMING by Margaret Greaves
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A charming tale and an intriguing dramatization of the power of names: a winner where unicorn stories are in demand (though this one will have to be pointed out: it's not on the jacket). (Picture book. 3-8)"
In pairs, the animals come for their names, each kind also receiving an appropriate litany of traits (``Lion'' is ``splendor,'' ``strength,'' ``courage,'' ``danger'') and a benediction: ``Go, and be blessed''; only the dogs elect to stay with Adam, where they are soon discovered by the fleas (``leaper....vexation''). Read full book review >
ODDS ON OLIVER by Constance C. Greene
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Greene's first foray into humorous fiction for a younger audience than her popular series about Al and Isabelle. Read full book review >
YO! YES? by Chris Raschka
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Whether it's caution or prejudice that's overcome, the process is reduced to elementals—two figures, roughly drawn yet vibrant with feeling, and their comical dialogue (a breeze for beginning readers), encompassing a world of meaning. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A classic scenario from the innovative creator of Charlie Parker Played Be Bop (1992)—two boys parlaying what could be a confrontation into friendship—in a series of monosyllabic exchanges between a stylishly informal, self-confident boy (black) who appears on the left-hand pages and the anxious, overdressed (white) newcomer on the right. ``Yo!'' ``Yes?''/``Hey!'' ``Who?''/``You!'' ``Me?'' they parry, their feet precisely planted at page bottom, their stances as expressive as the varied styles of Raschka's hand-lettered text. Read full book review >
JULIUS by Angela Johnson
by Angela Johnson, illustrated by Dav Pilkey
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Using ink, paint, fabric swatches, and even coffee spatters, Pilkey creates a riotous sequence in which Maya's happy face contrasts comically with her parents' glowers while her adored pink friend floats with bulbous grace. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The author of When I Am Old With You (1990) and other celebrations of loving companionship teams up with the mad colorist of When Cats Dream (1992) for a tale of a black family that finds itself saddled with a huge, exuberant pet. Read full book review >
THE COW WHO WOULDN'T COME DOWN by Paul Brett Johnson
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1993

"A delightful and well-polished first performance. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Poor Miss Rosemary! Read full book review >
THE MOLES AND THE MIREUK by Holly H. Kwon
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"An excellent edition of a perennially amusing tale. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A Korean version of the frequently retold tale of a mouse (e.g., Morimoto's The Mouse's Marriage, 1986) whose proud parents, looking for the mightiest mate for their ``perfect'' child, go from their own king to sun to cloud to wind to a wall that can be undermined by their own kind, with the result that another mouse is deemed the most powerful and appropriate suitor of all. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >