WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT SIKHISM? by Beryl Dhanjal
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 15, 1997

"For patient, scrupulous readers, some sense of Sikhism will emerge, but this is by no means a standard text on the religion. (maps, chronology, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
An entry in the What Do We Know About series that intends to enlighten but here only confuses. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Jan. 6, 1997

"For children making the transition to chapter books, this is readable fare, nothing more. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Zack, a boy with a propensity for supernatural experiences, and his friend Spencer, learn from a '60s-era book how to have an out-of-body experience. Read full book review >

THE STORY OF WRITING AND PRINTING by Anita Ganeri
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"In the Signs of the Times series, this is an engaging look at a revolutionary process that continues to unfold. (chronology, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
Anyone who has ever reveled in drawing with Magic Markers or has cherished a particular pen should enjoy this quick and upbeat introduction to the history of written text by Ganeri (Bizarre Beasts, p. 1532, etc.). Read full book review >
THE MEGAMOGS AND THE DANGEROUS DOUGHNUT by Peter Haswell
FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"The text is filled with Briticisms and bad puns; overworked wordplay and alliteration exhaust the storyline; the visually appealing Megamogs are cemented into a text that is fairly riddled with cleverness. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When the dastardly McDunk tries to steal customers from Miss Marbletop's doughnut shop, a band of hapless helpers in the form of cats called Megamogs rush to the rescue. Read full book review >
HARP SEAL PUPS by Downs Matthews
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Matthews names walruses, killer whales, and sharks as the seals' enemies, but it's a glaring omission not to include humans on the list. (map) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
An Arctic ice slab seems an especially cold delivery table, but for baby harp seals, it's also their crib and their nursery. Read full book review >

SODY SALLYRATUS by Teri Sloat
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Filled with autumn oranges, browns, and the crunchy look of fallen leaves, the illustrations capture the boisterous energy of the story. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
Sody Sallyratus, the stuff that makes biscuits rise, will give readers a rise too, in this retelling of a familiar tale. Read full book review >
LOS VAQUEROS by Sammye Munson
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"While the Mexican influence on the origins of the cowboy is neglected, this book doesn't tend to the oversight. (b&w photos, not seen, glossary, bibliography) (Fiction. 7-10)"
A fictional narrator, Francisco, tells about life on his Texas ranch, and passes along the stories his grandfather told him about the vaqueros, the Mexican cowboys. Read full book review >
SECRET SIGNS by Anita Riggio
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Underground Railroad along the route. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Riggio (A Moon in My Teacup, 1993, etc.) combines folk art and her experiences with sign language into a story about the Underground Railroad. Read full book review >
PUNIA AND THE KING OF SHARKS by Lee Wardlaw
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A skillful creation of a fantasy world. (glossary) (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
This engrossing Hawaiian folktale combines lyrical language and a lush setting. Read full book review >
THE MAGIC PORRIDGE POT by Harriet Ziefert
FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"It's just not much fun; the confines of the form, worked to such advantage by Minarik, Lobel, and Rylant (and Nola Buck—see review, above), make for a flat-footed telling here, and since most children know a version of the tale, there's no suspense to engage them. (Fiction/folklore. 4- 7)"
With beginning readers in mind, Ziefert (The Tweeny-Tiny Woman, 1995, etc.) retells the traditional story of the magic pot that won't stop cooking in this entry in the Easy-to-Read series. Read full book review >
BRIAN WILDSMITH'S AMAZING WORLD OF WORDS by Brian Wildsmith
NONFICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Drawbacks: There's an index for which any use is difficult to imagine, and the tab cuts on the pages will become quickly dog- eared. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Wildsmith (Saint Francis, 1995) enters the picture-search market long dominated by Waldo and the I Spy series. Read full book review >
THE GOOCH MACHINE by Brod Bagert
POETRY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Jean Marzollo's Pretend You're A Cat (1990), the acting-out potential seems indirect at best. (Poetry. 7-9)"
In these ``Poems for Children to Perform,'' young readers may first elect to scratch their heads: ``Alien Eyes?'' is about looking into another planet's sky; ``The Homework Guarantee'' covers procrastination; and ``Butterfly Fire'' trumpets something about ``the flame of poet-fire/When it burns in children's eyes.'' Budding dramatists can take hints from the chubby-face children who cavort through Ellis's sprawling cartoon scenes; these are usually light in mood, although the image of a man sweating over his taxes is a dismal take on ``Dad's Greatest Fear''—``that someday/I'll grow up just like him.'' Bagert's occasional proficiency, as in ``The Food Cheer''—``Carnivores! Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >