CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Text and photographs work a special magic to make the past feel new. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-10)"
A moving album, combining a quiet, questioning text with sepia-toned photographs that self-taught Richard Samuel Roberts took during the 1920s and '30s, in the African-American community of Columbia, South Carolina. Read full book review >
GABBY GROWING UP by Amy Hest
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

A sequel to The Purple Coat (1986) that is, on its own, a tender story. Read full book review >

EXPLOR-A-MAZE by Robert Snedden
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Iceland) makes this less useful for in-depth research and report writing, but attractive to armchair explorers. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
From ship to shore, readers follow maps and mazes to trace the routes of an array of famous explorers—Buzz Aldrin, Roald Amundsen, Neil Armstrong, Leif Eriksson, Vasco da Gama, and Marco Polo among them. Read full book review >
THE BUNNY WHO FOUND EASTER by Charlotte Zolotow
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"The text overcomes any small flaws with its mood, and its appeal to the sensibilities of a tender age. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A rite of spring is glorified again in a newly illustrated edition of an old-fashioned, childlike book that was first published in 1959. Read full book review >
55 WAVERLY STREET by Thom Black
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Since the symbolism isn't exactly clear or compelling, children may identify more with the dog, always an outsider looking in, than the boy. (Picture book. 7-9)"
In this arch and oddly phrased allegory, a child joins other neighborhood children slipping through gaps in a hedge around the yard of a mysterious old house ``to do what they do, do, do''—in his case fix plants, by repotting them. Read full book review >

LEMONADE SUN by Rebecca Kai Dotlich
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"The cityscapes are especially strong and evocative. (Picture book/poetry. 4-8)"
Dotlich (Sweet Dreams of the Wild, 1996) uses her poetry to call up moments in a summer. Read full book review >
JUST RIGHT STEW by Karen English
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Rich's illustrations add immeasurably to the mix, vividly depicting the gathering of big, bold personalities as the family converges on the pot of stew. (Picture book. 5-9)"
This charmer of a story revolves around the construction of an oxtail stew as witnessed by Victoria, a loving granddaughter who knows how to keep a secret. Read full book review >
BACK TO THE BLUE by Virginia McKenna
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Random dolphin facts fill the final pages of this superficial commemoration of a triumph of the animal-rights movement. (Picture book. 7-10)"
This Born Free Wildlife Book about the removal of one of the last captive dolphins in the UK to the wild—shown from from both the dolphin's and his rescuers' points of view—suffers from mediocre writing and a too-visible agenda. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"In her picture-book debut, Von Buhler skillfully emulates the primitive folk-art style with characteristically solid, straight-mouthed figures and clean, flat lines. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In his first book, in homage to American folk art, Nicholson imagines the story behind the painting Portrait of a Little Girl in a Red Dress with Cat and Dog in the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City. Read full book review >
SAINT PATRICK by Ann Tompert
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"As the story pales, Garland's curious, mixed-media illustrations, with a variety of digitalized patterns, become that much more compelling. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The lineaments of Saint Patrick's life comprise the barest of bones in this work from Tompert (How Rabbit Lost His Tail, 1997, etc.), which is less biography than leap in the dark. Read full book review >
THE ELEPHANT TRUCK by Will Travers
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Even to readers who have never seen elephants in the wild, this book makes clear the value of preserving both the animal and its habitat, and does so without condescension or oversimplification. (Picture book. 7-10)"
This Born Free Wildlife Book makes clear that the elephant may soon go the way of the passenger pigeon; ironically, humans are behind both the demise of the pachyderms, and their survival. Read full book review >
UPCHUCK AND THE ROTTEN WILLY by Bill Wallace
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"As it should, friendship overcomes all; despite the unnecessarily pandering title, the book has a gentle message that comes through without treacle. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 8-12)"
From Wallace (True Friends, 1994, etc.), a tale of interspecies friendship. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >