A WINDOW OF TIME by Audrey O. Leighton
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A sweetly philosophical look at time, memory, and the connection between old and young. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Shawn tells readers about his grandfather, who often seems lost in the past, in a gently rhythmic text. Read full book review >
WASHING THE WILLOW TREE LOON by Jacqueline Briggs Martin
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Note on Bird Rehabilitation'' is included. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An involving tale to help youngsters understand the effects of oil spills by focusing on the travails of a single loon. Read full book review >

THE STONE DANCERS by Nora Martin
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

An imaginative but not wholly successful debut set in a remote mountainside village in 19th-century France. Read full book review >
THE GIFT OF A TRAVELER by Wendy Matthews
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Van Nutt's illustrations serve as folkloric decorations for a warm and brilliant tale, like a Yuletide fire stoked with memories of lost Christmases. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A bright debut—Matthews shows a rare command of the story-within-a-story format. Read full book review >
CARAVAN by Jr. McKay
by Jr. McKay, illustrated by Darryl Ligasan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"The author's note includes geographic information and also acts as a glossary. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Jura is one of the nomadic Kirghiz people of Afghanistan, preparing for the first time to accompany his father on a caravan across the Hindu Kush mountains for supplies. Read full book review >

TREEMONISHA by Angela Shelf Medearis
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Lively; the long text is a pleasure to read out loud. (Picture book. 7-11)"
A wonderful prose retelling of Scott Joplin's opera, set in Arkansas in the 1880s, in three acts brimming with dancing, preaching, and hustling. Read full book review >
FAIRY WINGS by Lauren Mills
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Challenge lovers of wee folk with David Christiana's surprising, considerably less conventional White Nineteens (1992) instead. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A collaboration between the creator of The Rag Coat (1991) and the creator of The Castle Builder (1993) results in an anemic, predictable tale of a wingless fairy saving her sept from a troll and getting engaged to a prince. Read full book review >
JEREMY'S MUFFLER by Laura F. Nielsen
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Certainly. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Nielsen and Schneider's first book is a wacky and wild read- aloud just right for the older end of the picture-book set. Read full book review >
ANASTASIA, ABSOLUTELY by Lois Lowry
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"As usual, Lowry (The Giver, 1993, etc.) delivers tight, page-turning prose, plenty of humor, and characters right out of readers' neighborhooods. (Fiction. 7-12)"
In which Anastasia Krupnik gets a dog, attends a class in values, and inadvertently deposits a hag of dog poop in a public mailbox. Read full book review >
GOOSEBERRY PARK by Cynthia Rylant
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A tender tale delivered by a sure hand. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a humorous contemporary fable about friendship, courage, and loyalty, Rylant (Dog Heaven, p. 951, etc.) creates an unlikely trio of friends: Stumpy, a red squirrel, Kona, a Labrador, and Gwendolyn, a hermit crab. Read full book review >
ARTHUR AND THE SWORD by Robert Sabuda
ROMANCE
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Sabuda includes source notes and acknowledges the story's historical basis. (Picture book. 6-9)"
In this version of the familiar tale, Sabuda (The Christmas Alphabet, 1994, etc.) captures Arthur as a child hero, a fact that readers will find especially satisfying. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE SEVEN-COLORED HORSE by Robert D. San Souci
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Dicks's ethereal paintings- -sometimes awkward, sometimes moodily stylized—have a lovely, translucent quality that comes through in most scenes. (Picture book/folklore. 4-9)"
In source notes, San Souci (More Short & Shivery, 1994, etc.) explains that his tale has roots throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >