CHIMPS DON'T WEAR GLASSES by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The first book will create demand for the second, but there are empty calories in this sequel. (Picture book. 5-7)"
This follow-up to Dogs Don't Wear Sneakers (1993) offers more of the same random, rollicking doggerel``Horses don't hang glide/Giraffes don't drive cars/And you won't see a piglet saving pennies in jars,'' etc.matched to busy, literal cartoons filled with animals clothed and posed accordingly. Read full book review >
THE ENCHANTED TREE by Flavia Weedn
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A noble effort that comes off preachy and predictable. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Delicate illustrations enliven this otherwise heavy-handed work. Read full book review >

EVERYDAY MYSTERIES by Jerome Wexler
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The exercise is mildly amusing but the whole enterprise never overcomes a sense of languid familiarity. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A book of full-color photographs by Wexler (Jack-in-the- Pulpit, 1993, etc.) divided into five different sections, each of which invites readers to take a different close-up view of everyday objects, from sweaters to potato chips. Read full book review >
FIESTA U.S.A. by George Ancona
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The book conveys the festivity of each ceremony and serves both as a valuable introduction to and a celebration of some of the Latino cultures that enrich this country. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-10)"
Four Latino-American festivals are chronicled here, photographed in four different citiesDay of the Dead (San Francisco), Las Posadas (Albuquerque), Matachines (El Rancho, New Mexico), and Three Kings' Day (New York City). Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Back matter includes a world map of the featured places, a glossary, and a plea to help end world hunger. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In a companion to This Is the Way We Go to School (1990), Baer and Bjîrkman tour 22 different locales (identified this time around, with half of them in North America) to show readers, in rhymed couplets and watercolor illustrations, what kids are having for lunch. Read full book review >

ALL ABOUT OWLS by Jim Arnosky
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"One night scene shows ghostly owls, swooping between shadowy trees, with white hand-lettered owl cries and the names of the birds indentified in white type; it's a poetic composition that is also confusing. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-8)"
A first look at owls for younger readers. Read full book review >
NEVER RIDE YOUR ELEPHANT TO SCHOOL by Doug Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Both the words and art make use of every opportunity to mock teachers, but it's all in good fun. (Picture book. 4-6)"
With straight faces and high spirits, Johnson and Carter (Never Babysit the Hippopotamuses!, 1993) offer reasons for the command of the title, e.g., ``Elephants are good at math and love to give answers. Read full book review >
I HEARD SAID THE BIRD by Polly Berrien Berends
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Pleasingly subtle, cheerful, and big-hearted. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A bird zips into the barnyard, a feathered Paul Revere, with a late-breaking flash: A ``NEW ONE'' is coming. Read full book review >
MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE by Marie Bradby
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Regardless, this is an immensely satisfying, accomplished work, resonating first with longing and then with joy. (Picture book. 5- 8)"
An inspiring story of young boy's compelling desire to read. Read full book review >
THE MOST AMAZING NIGHT BOOK by Robert Crowther
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Second, and an old problem at that, for institutional use: The book is not sturdy, and won't hold up to repeat viewings. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A cross between a book and a toy: Readers are invited to lift flaps, pull tabs, and turn wheels and watch windows open and close, trains and airplanes move, movies run, and Ferris wheels spin. Read full book review >
THE FLUTE PLAYER/LA FLAUTISTA by Robyn Eversole
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"As notes warble forth, his idiosyncratic shapes venture across skewed landscapes in vivid accompaniment to the words. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The slippery, undefinable beauty of the experience of listening to music is captured in this pleasant tale that bobs along like birdsong. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE SWINEHERD AND OTHER TALES by Paula Fox
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The whimsical, childish quality of the pictures nicely matches the text; the humor is dry and the poignancy understated. (Folklore. 8-12)"
Fables, first published in 1978, appear in a newly illustrated edition. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >