THE OLD WOMAN WHO LOVED TO READ by John Winch
ANIMALS
Released: March 15, 1997

"The humor here is in no way the sopping happily-ever-after sort; instead, the edges of harsh realities become heartening. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Platypus and pig, koala and kangaroo are a few of the sumptuously rendered animal visitors to an old woman's small farmhouse in the countryside. Read full book review >
THE RING OF TRUTH by Teresa Bateman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 15, 1997

"A cohesive, enchanting book. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Bateman's first book is a beautifully layered, consistently sprightly take on the notion that truth is stranger than fiction. Read full book review >

GRANDPA BEAR'S FANTASTIC SCARF by Gillian Heal
ANIMALS
Released: March 15, 1997

"Salubrious thoughts, surely- -charmingly illustrated in watercolor—but the book is an onslaught of lessons rather than a story, and more likely to appeal to adults than to children. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Grandpa Bear's Fantastic Scarf (32 pp.; $14.95; Mar. 15, 1997; 1- 885223-41-2): A little bear learns from his wise old grandfather about the weaving of a life—his grandfather's scarf is as long and multicolored as his years in this book. Read full book review >
LITTLE RED COWBOY HAT by Susan Lowell
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"A merry success, this Wild West fairy tale makes other versions look limp by comparison. (Picture book. 5-8)"
``Once upon a ranch'' is how Lowell begins her enjoyable twist on the story of Little Red Riding Hood, starring a brave heroine who needs no lesson in self-reliance. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Gregory brings a sobering dose of reality to an era that's often romanticized; this is a fine glimpse of history on a human scale. (b&w photos, map) (Fiction. 8-14)"
In a work subtitled ``The Oregon Trail Diary of Hattie Campbell,'' Gregory (Earthquake at Dawn, 1992, etc.) reconvenes the Dear America series in 1847, as Hattie, her parents, and her two younger brothers begin the long trek from Missouri to Oregon by wagon train. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"A superb, well-researched book that finds extraordinary science in the everyday life of a butterfly. (maps, diagrams, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A migration flight from New England to Mexico and back again would be impressive for a large goose; for a monarch butterfly, it's nothing short of miraculous. Read full book review >
THE SEED BUNNY by Jennifer  Selby
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"An ebullient take on an important rite of passage. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Selby (Beach Bunny, 1996) offers another affectionate and accurate portrayal of the bond between parents and preschoolers. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 1997

"The illustrated, kid-friendly instructions have no more than six steps, and the insets of the club members conversing and cavorting will engage preschoolers while parents ready work spaces for action. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Squirrel and raccoon friends Winky, Skipper, and Tag from The Make-Something Club (1994) reunite on a cold winter day for the making of 12 preschool projects, one for each month of the year. Read full book review >
ROSA MOVES TO TOWN by Barbro Lindgren
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Scary. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Rosa is a spunky dog, a veritable Hoover of the canine realm, ingesting every interesting morsel she encounters whether it is food or not. Read full book review >
THE ANIMALS' SONG by David L. Harrison
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"This book, a group of preschoolers, and a rhythm band set form a cacophonous combination with appeal that's loud and clear. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Fans of old-fashioned rhyming books will warm to this perky celebration of sight and sound: ``There was a little girl/With a silver flute,/Toot toot/Tootity toot,/Who puckered her lips/And blew her flute,/Tootity tootity toot.'' Soon she is joined by a little boy with ``a rumity drum,'' a hooty owl, a sleepy ``yippity'' dog, a cow, a pony, a rooster, a pig, bird, goose, lamb, duck, pigeon, and a shy mouse from ``under the sink.'' All together they make a crew that recalls the Bremen town musicians in a noisy, onomatopoeic parade: ``They sang and danced/And skipped along/With a flute and a drum/And the animals' song.'' The parade ends grandly; the girl who started it all is fast asleep in her sunset-drenched bedroom, her toys gathered around her. Read full book review >
PUTTING ON A PLAY by Nancy Bentley
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"An admirably lucid and concise presentation of the essentials of stagecraft, with plenty of encouragement for aspiring thespians. (index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
The collaborators behind The Young Producer's Video Book (1995, not reviewed) cast this book, subtitled ``The Young Playwright's Guide to Scripting, Directing, and Performing,'' in the same format: an easy-to-read how-to-do-it guide, with a welcome emphasis on the structure and content of the drama rather than on the technicalities of acting and production. Read full book review >
TWO'S COMPANY by Shirley Greenway
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Back matter includes scientific names and a paragraph of interesting facts about each animal. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-8)"
A book of collective nouns paired with full-color photographs from Oxford Scientific Films and brief lines of text for 13 animals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >