JOOKA SAVES THE DAY by Gilles Eduar
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Vibrant illustrations and small touches lift this story from the ordinary, and establish a magical world akin to that of Babar—a world that readers will respond to happily. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Despite the preliminarily disenchanting premise of the different-one-who-wins, Eduar, with ebullient illustrations that blaze with tropical scenery and color, sweeps readers into the saga of how Jooka-zay-kajoo's search for his unique identity leads him to unity with the crocodiles. Read full book review >
FLYING DIMITRI by Blair Drawson
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"The flight has failed, and perhaps all such flights are doomed to fail, but Dimitri declares himself happy to be homea situation shared by many readers and one that is sufficiently full to be satisfying. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Drawson (Mary Margaret's Tree, 1996) tells a bittersweet, imaginative tale of a boy's bedtime flight, which comes at tooth- brushing time at the end of a happy day—his father's birthday. Read full book review >

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS by Steven Kellogg
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A talent-strewn retelling that only enhances the original. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
Kellogg (I Was Born About 10,000 Years Ago, 1996, etc.) puts a master's spin on another familiar tale. Read full book review >
THE SEVEN GODS OF LUCK by David Kudler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Although two paintings show the children with the very wares that they have already traded away, Finch's watercolors are well done and innovative in composition, and manage to present fresh details of an unfamiliar culture in every picture. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The kindness and generosity of two children result in a great reward for them at New Year's in an unusual fable set in Japan. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"What sets this folktale apart from many others is the author's theatrical sense of timing; Souhami cues storytellers as to the inflections and pauses for suspense that will make this a story- hour favorite. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
Souhami (The Leopard's Drum, 1996, etc.) creates bold illustrations that have the look of cut-paper collage for this retelling of a Hindu tale from The Ramayana. Read full book review >

WHEN THE WIND BEARS GO DANCING by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Stone's woolly cloud creatures will bring comfort to little ones distressed by thunder claps; a striking nighttime palette of purple, deep blue, and orange perfectly counters any sentimentalism in the text. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rhyme to soften the roar of thunderclouds and the flash of lightning by transforming them. Read full book review >
CHINATOWN by William Low
by William Low, illustrated by William Low
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

A fictionalized walking tour of New York's Chinatown at the time of the New Year celebration, conducted by a young Chinese- American boy and his grandmother. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CORGIVILLE KIDNAPPING by Tasha Tudor
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Julia Child, Gertrude Stein, and others who will not be known to children, but Tudor's devotees will love this caper, and others will want to go unearth the first work. (Picture book. 7-10)"
A delectable companion to The Corgiville Fair (1971), in which Tudor employs conversational prose to revisit the pastoral setting and farmyard inhabitants of the original. Read full book review >
HIGGINS BEND SONG AND DANCE by Jacqueline B. Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Some of the townspeople look quite goofy, but they also look familiar, in a tale clearly fished from American waters. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A meaty tale of the quest for an uncatchable fish named Oscar is told in folksy, irresistible language. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Skeptics who question the notion of a gender-specific science book may find Wyatt's afterword useful, but with so many non-gender-specific activity and experiment books available, this one seems appropriate only for the most desperately timid. (diagrams, charts, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A well-intentioned collection of experiments, puzzles, tricks, and tips meant to make science concepts and careers approachable to girls. Read full book review >
AN OCTOPUS FOLLOWED ME HOME by Dan Yaccarino
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Smaller creatures are painted creatively, too: Penguins line the refrigerator rack like a row of bowling pins, and rabbits appear to be part bunny, part carrot. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Assembling a menagerie of pets to perturb parents is nothing new, found in Steven Kellogg's Can I Keep Him? (1971) and Jake Wolf's Daddy Could I Have an Elephant? (1996), to name two. Read full book review >
THE PAINTING GORILLA by Michael  Rex
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Jovial cartoons add a sunny look to the pages that promise a lot of monkeying around but don't deliver. (Picture book. 3-6)"
From the illustrator of David Getz's Floating Home (p. 380), the story of a gorilla who finds plenty of subject matter for her artwork in the zoo where she lives. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >