POND YEAR by Kathryn Lasky
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"The whole, however, is a treasured memory of a gentler, more peaceful time, a book for sharing and remembering. (Fiction. 4-8)"
The author (Days of the Dead, 1994, etc.) of many fine science titles recounts a quiet adventure from her own childhood up in Indiana. Read full book review >
BATS ABOUT BASEBALL by Jean Little
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1995

"Spry and snappy as a Nolan Ryan fastball. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Nana is a baseball fanatic—come the season, she's parked in front of the tube, hootin' and hollerin'. Read full book review >

EMEKA'S GIFT by Ifeoma Onyefulu
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"A graceful counting lesson. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-9)"
From one small boy to ten grinning cousins, Onyefulu (A Is for Africa, 1993), crafts a numbers book to teach and delight. Read full book review >
THE GIFTS OF WALI DAD by Aaron Shepard
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 1, 1995

"A fun, well-crafted book, with nothing out of place. (Picture book/folklore. 5-8)"
A comic folktale with a plot of crystalline symmetry. Read full book review >
PETROSINELLA by Diane Stanley
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 1, 1995

"An elegant alternative to the Brothers Grimm. (Picture book/folklore. 8-10)"
Stanley (Cleopatra, 1994, etc.) combines her 1981 illustrations for this tale with a new, less-contrived, more modern-sounding retelling. Read full book review >

THE GIFT OF DRISCOLL LIPSCOMB by Sara Yamaka
COLORS
Released: May 1, 1995

A lyrical parable, told in a voice that is big on wonder and small on irony. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"It's hard to locate favorites without an index or table of contents, but the endpapers place the poems perfectly with a colorful map of the Caribbean. (Picture book/poetry. 4-7)"
These 39 bouncy rhymes require a little practice before reading aloud; the rhythms are tricky, but irresistible. Read full book review >
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 1995

"From alligator to zapus, this is an alphabet not to be missed. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-12)"
A sumptuous ABC of predators and their prey, splendid for display or for careful, close viewing. Read full book review >
SHADOWVILLE by Michael Bartalos
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 1995

"An auspicious debut. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Shadows are the actors here, looming over the small figures who cast them, then separating themselves for an independent dusk- to-dawn festival in Shadowville. ``Shadows wearing / Shadow shorts / Spend the / Night at / Shadow sports.'' Of course, sunrise brings them back to their originators, but not before readers have been wowed by all the visual acrobatics. Read full book review >
SOPHIE THE CIRCUS PRINCESS by Stig Claesson
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Henstra's watercolors give the characters a genuine warmth, or, in the case of the Gestapo-types who come to arrest the prince, a suitable sinisterness. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A stunt rider of horses in a circus, Sophie is wooed and won by a flashy gent posing as the prince of Pomerania. Read full book review >
THE MORNING CHAIR by Barbara M. Joosse
FICTION
Released: April 24, 1995

"Sewall's light, creamy gouaches—soft colors (butter yellow, plenty of baby blue) with thick black outlines- -resonate with the text, with impressionistic strokes that sometimes give way to mere sketchiness. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Bram's happy life in Holland consists of eating raw herring by the sea with Papa and snuggling in the morning chair with Mama. Read full book review >
FIG PUDDING by Ralph Fletcher
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 24, 1995

"Sensitive to all the potential problems of the disparity between the substance and the style of his book, Fletcher (I Am Wings, not reviewed) displays an extremely gentle touch. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A book about a big happy family, with lots of laughter, lots of cooking, and lots of eating; it opens with Cliff, the 11-year- old narrator and oldest of six children, ``getting ready to dig into a steaming plate of French toast,'' and closes with his whole family laughing so hard that tears are running down their faces. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >