THERE IS A CROCODILE UNDER MY BED by Ingrid Schubert
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A deftly upbeat encounter that should go a long way toward quelling any nascent nighttime anxieties. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Far from being frightened, a small child is utterly delighted to find a green, toothy monster under her bed. Read full book review >
MAZEL TOV! IT'S A BOY/MAZEL TOV! IT'S A GIRL by Jamie Korngold
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A joyful and eminently useful book. (Picture book/religion. 2-7)"
The joy of welcoming a new baby into a Jewish home is portrayed in this dos-à-dos, dual-gender photo essay. Read full book review >

JODIE'S SHABBAT SURPRISE by Anna Levine
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Kids probably wouldn't want to drink juice produced by bare feet, but that prospect is more intriguing than this minor effort. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A dog makes an unexpected discovery just before Shabbat. Read full book review >
JOEY AND THE GIANT BOX by Deborah Lakritz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Joey would be more sympathetic if he didn't sound like an ad. He's about as believable as a parent who says, 'My child would rather have a box than a toy.' (Picture book. 4-8)"
Beware of books about good role models. Read full book review >
THE BUK BUK BUK FESTIVAL by Mary Jane Auch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"This one should fly off the shelf frequently and will be eminently useful in author-visit prep. (Picture book. 5-7)"
The latest pun-filled poultry parody from the Auchs (Beauty and the Beaks, 2007, etc.) explores the travails and triumphs of a hen who strives to be a published writer.Read full book review >

GRACE by Kate Parkinson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"There is more than one way to shine on stage, as Grace happily attests. (Early reader. 2-6)"
Grace is just not graceful. Read full book review >
FUN IN THE SUN by David Catrow
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"So enjoyable the real thing may pale in comparison. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A self-sufficient pup takes his beloved pet to the beach. High jinks ensue. Read full book review >
THE END OF THE RAINBOW by Liza Donnelly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Though children will probably move on from it quickly, it will definitely help them on their ways. (Early reader. 4-7)"
This early-reader riff on cumulative folk tales features a girl in pursuit of the end of a rainbow who discovers there's no pot of gold. Read full book review >
BY TROLLEY PAST THIMBLEDON BRIDGE by Ashley Bryan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Bileck and Bryan capture the stuff of dreams in this mesmerizing and multifaceted pageant. (contributors' notes) (Picture book. 5-9)"
With echoes of Lear and Stevenson, this journey into the land of dreams pairs a detailed Old World setting with a pulsing four-beat rhythm to pull readers into its magical realm. Read full book review >
CLICK! by Jeffrey Ebbeler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"An enjoyable bedtime story that demands to be heard. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An industrious lamp in the shape of a bird fixes all things that go bump in the night. Read full book review >
THE FRUITS WE EAT by Gail Gibbons
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"This lacks the information of other nonfiction titles and the pizzazz of April Pulley Sayre's Go, Go, Grapes! (2012), but it may be just the ticket before a school trip to a farm. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
The prolific Gibbons tackles fruits—how they grow, their parts, and what portions we eat. Read full book review >
A PIG CALLED HEATHER by Harry Oulton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Stocked with flashes of wit, unlikely twists and narrow escapes from capture, this amiable ramble slides smoothly into the literary sty occupied by Wilbur, Babe, Mercy Watson and like talented porkers. (Animal fantasy. 8-10)"
When her "[b]est two-legged friend" moves away to London from a farm in Scotland, Heather follows—earning national celebrity on the way. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >