A DRAGON'S GUIDE TO THE CARE AND FEEDING OF HUMANS by Laurence Yep
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

" Delightful whimsy. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
This comedy starring a 3,000-year-old dragon and a scrappy little girl takes young readers into a fantasy world situated right next to ours. Read full book review >
MS. RAPSCOTT'S GIRLS by Elise Primavera
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"This is not an emotionally involving tale but one that's quirky and imaginative, aimed at middle-graders who like their fiction with a twist. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Aided by her two corgis, the headmistress of the Great Rapscott School for Girls of Busy Parents teaches her 8-year-old charges—Beatrice, Mildred, Fay and Annabelle, children whose parents don't have time for them—how to take care of themselves. Read full book review >

MARILYN'S MONSTER by Michelle Knudsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A surprising spin on monsters with nicely effective artwork—and heart. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Marilyn waits and waits for her monster to find her, the way all her friends' monster companions found them, until she finally gives up and goes looking for him. Read full book review >
THE DEATH OF THE HAT by Paul B. Janeczko
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Another winning collaboration from two luminaries. (acknowledgements) (Picture book/poetry. 8-12)"
Janeczko and Raschka reunite for a fourth anthology, featuring poems spanning two millennia. Read full book review >
THE MAINE COON'S HAIKU by Michael J. Rosen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"This perfect poetical paean to pussycats makes both a fine gift for a cat lover and an excellent haiku handbook. (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
A kitty companion to The Cuckoo's Haiku (2009) and The Hound Dog's Haiku (2011).Read full book review >

WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORWOOD by Shawn Sheehy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"An auspicious debut, imparting a worthy message in playful language and harmonious, sophisticated paper design. (Informational pop-up book. 6-9)"
Seven big, multileveled pop-up versions of animal-built homes or other structures highlight nature's interconnectedness. Read full book review >
SWEEP UP THE SUN by Helen Frost
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"All-around gorgeous; Frost and Lieder again showcase the splendor of nature through the happy marriage of literal and figurative images. (Picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
A picture-book poem calling for adventure that's—thankfully—for the birds. Read full book review >
HIPPOS ARE HUGE! by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"The combined effect is a playful, clever introduction to the hippo that works for read-alouds or independent study. (index, author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Hippos are huge, graceful and dangerous, as depicted in this colorful, informative book for the youngest naturalists. Read full book review >
SMALL ELEPHANT'S BATHTIME by Tatyana Feeney
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Charming, brilliant in color and execution, and funny to even the most indignant foot stompers, NO! screamers and bathtime boycotters. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Small Elephant loves water—most of the time. Read full book review >
ROOM FOR BEAR by Ciara Gavin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Just ducky. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Creating a blended family demands a new choice in housing in Gavin's picture-book debut. Read full book review >
LITTLE BIRD TAKES A BATH by Marisabina Russo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Simple and understated—and all the more enjoyable for it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In the decidedly urban setting that Little Bird calls his own, he wakes up with a song—he always starts his day with a song—and looks for a puddle for a bath after the unpleasantness of the nighttime rain. Read full book review >
FROGGY'S BIRTHDAY WISH by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Predictable fare to be sure, but series fans will likely follow Froggy wherever he goes. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In his 24th adventure, Froggy finally celebrates a birthday. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >