DREW THE SCREW by Mattia Cerato
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Words like 'measures' might be challenging for this first reader, but for the most part, Cerato brings the coolness of working in the toolshed to life. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An anthropomorphic screw introduces readers to the tools in his shed then suffers a modest existential crisis before he learns his own raison d'être. Read full book review >
MR. MCGINTY'S MONARCHS by Linda Vander Heyden
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"An appealing and appropriate addition to the nature shelf in the preschool and early elementary grades. (Informational picture book. 4-7)"
Mr. McGinty and his dog, Sophie, perform a heroic monarch rescue. Read full book review >

AT THE MARSH IN THE MEADOW by Jeanie Mebane
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Simplistic science with appealing illustrations and a catchy text. (author's notes, glossary) (Picture book. 3-6)"
A simple text slowly adds members of a marsh food chain, "House That Jack Built"-style, from mud to raptors. Read full book review >
DON'T CALL ME GRANDMA by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Children will best appreciate this nostalgic journey when accompanied by a doting loved one. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Scary grandmas are always called "grandMOTHER," especially if they are 96-year-old great-grandmothers who have "chocolaty brown" skin and are named Nell and sometimes growl into their mirrors. Read full book review >
WHEN THE SUN SHINES ON ANTARCTICA by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A tender, lively, and mostly thoughtful tour through summer on the frozen continent. (glossary, further reading) (Informational picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
For six months straight, the sun shines in Antarctica, and the ice and oceans are alive with activity. Read full book review >

WHOSE HANDS ARE THESE? by Miranda Paul
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A great addition to libraries' and teacher's shelves for units on community helpers. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
Rhyming verses and illustrations of hands working give readers the opportunity to guess what community jobs people do. Read full book review >
SURF'S UP by Kwame Alexander
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A warmhearted tribute to reading. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A sunny day near the ocean means different kinds of excitement for frog friends Bro and Dude. Read full book review >
WHEN YOU GIVE AN IMP A PENNY by Henry Herz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"It might be fun once, but Numeroff really holds a corner on this particular market. (Picture book. 5-7)"
If you give an imp a penny, he'll ask for a glass of milk—er, a "coin bag" to go with it. Read full book review >
TIMO'S GARDEN by Victoria Allenby
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A fine title for growing readers. (Early reader. 7-9)"
Timo the rabbit is eager to make his garden "great." Read full book review >
DR. SEUSS by Kate Klimo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Not essential but a handsome tribute. (Early reader/biography. 5-7)"
For children who can read And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street without help, an account of its creator's life and career.Read full book review >
KNIT-KNOTTERS by Sam Hay
by Sam Hay, illustrated by Turine Tran
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"This slim chapter book has an even slimmer foundation. (Fantasy. 6-8)"
Stella encounters the night sprites, mischievous nocturnal beings that steal socks, hide the caps of markers, and knit children's hair into knots, among other mild wickednesses, in this series opener. Read full book review >
APOLLO by George O'Connor
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Apollo's darker tendencies overshadow his divine radiance here but, as usual, make better tales. (Olympian family tree) (Graphic mythology. 8-14)"
O'Connor makes out his latest Olympian as a tragic hero "who has had many loves, but whose loves seldom prosper." To say the least. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >