THE WANT MONSTERS by Chelo Manchego
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A child-friendly introduction to the challenging work of knowing one's mind. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The child narrator in this story has a Want Monster. Want Monsters aren't bad; everyone has one. However, this one has grown much too big. Read full book review >
SPRING FOR SOPHIE by Yael Werber
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Rural and suburban readers in northern climes will find much to recognize. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A little girl uses all her senses to detect the signs of spring. Read full book review >

THE LANGUAGE OF ANGELS by Richard Michelson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A lively introduction to the work of a Hebrew language scholar and lover—and his family. (afterword, further reading) (Picture book. 7-10)"
The ancient Hebrew language enters the modern world. Read full book review >
ANTOINETTE by Kelly DiPucchio
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A reassuring tale that celebrates the uniqueness of each dog (or person) and the creation of a purposeful life. Three cheers for the winning Antoinette, who 'could not—would not—give up!' (Picture book. 2-7)"
The beloved puppies of Gaston (2014) are back, this time with Antoinette's story of self-discovery as she reveals that every dog has a gift to share. Read full book review >
Hilo by Judd Winick
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Continually fabulous. (Graphic science fiction. 7-12)"
The titular towheaded robot hero returns with his Asian-American best friend, D.J., on another whirlwind adventure—this time to save their African-American friend Gina and, possibly, another world. Read full book review >

SCI-FI JUNIOR HIGH by Scott Seegert
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A cosmic misfire. (Science fiction. 8-10)"
Kelvin Klosmo goes to the wacky Sci-Fi Junior High. Read full book review >
GRAND CANYON by Jason Chin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Beautiful but, sadly, not as immersive as Chin's fans may hope. (Informational picture book. 6-11)"
Starting from their campsite at the bottom of the 1,000-foot-deep Inner Gorge, an Asian-American child and her dad traverse three separate habitats until they arrive at the South Rim, 22 miles later. Read full book review >
THE BLUE HOUR by Isabelle Simler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 20, 2017

"Lovely, if poorly hung together. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A visual rhapsody in blue. Read full book review >
THE HIDING GAME by Gwen Strauss
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 17, 2017

"Gripping and intense. (Picture book. 7-11)"
In 1940 Aube and her parents, a French poet and a painter, were on the run from the Nazis in occupied France, until they were rescued and given temporary refuge in the Villa Air-Bel in Vichy France. Read full book review >
DUCK, DUCK, DINOSAUR AND THE NOISE AT NIGHT by Kallie George
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 17, 2017

"Would that all such nighttime disturbances could be so easily explained. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The loud noise that keeps waking Feather, Flap, and Spike turns out to have a decidedly un-scary origin. Read full book review >
A ROCKETFUL OF SPACE POEMS by John Foster
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"The poems are, at best, lesser lights in the poetic firmament, but the pictures provide enough boost to get them off the ground. (Picture book/poetry. 6-8)"
Goofy cartoons featuring wildly baroque spacecraft and many-limbed aliens illustrate 26 poems, nearly all new and out of—or at least off—this world. Read full book review >
THE LAND OF NOD by Robert Louis Stevenson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A warm reminder that adventures await, no further away than the nearest pillow. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A child confined indoors by an injury tumbles off to dreamland in this surreal but comforting edition of the classic short poem. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >