SEARCHING by Olga de Dios
by Olga de Dios, illustrated by Olga de Dios, translated by Robin Sinclair
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"A simple search-and-find with an easy message for curious, perceptive young readers. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A lone, melancholy protagonist changes its floor-staring routine to engage with new friends and the world around it. Read full book review >
SLUMBER UNDER THE STARS by Maria Gianferrari
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"Another winning friendship tale from a lovable duo. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Following their introduction in The School Show (2015), Penny and Jelly face another crisis head-on, using their indelible friendship to solve a problem. Read full book review >

LINCOLN AND KENNEDY by Gene Barretta
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"Marred by its own contrivances. (further facts, trivia, unsourced quotes, glossary, sources) (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
Barretta adopts a familiar narrative device, contrasting the lives—separated by a century—of presidents Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy. Read full book review >
LITTLE WING LEARNS TO FLY by Calista Brill
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"Brill's tale tips the didactic scale, but the importance of rules needs to reach dragon-loving kids as well. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A tiny dragon wants to fly—and picks up important life lessons as well. Read full book review >
WOODPECKER WANTS A WAFFLE by Steve Breen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"Serves up fun (and likely a waffle craving)—a good bet for breakfast reading. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Will this woodpecker wishing for waffles win one? Read full book review >

FLIP & FIN by Timothy Gill
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"A passable tale for the shark-obsessed, but there are funnier fish in the sea. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Sand shark twins Flip and Fin return as supersharks. Read full book review >
LOCKER HERO by Rachel Renée Russell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"This spinoff is heavy on the poop jokes and light on almost everything else—readers expecting a boy Dork Diaries with equal nuance may be surprised. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 8-12)"
This is Max Crumbly's first experience in public school, and so far he's vomited on bully Doug "Thug" Thurston, forfeited a race due to his insistent bladder, and been locked in his locker—but it's still better than home-schooling with Grandma. Read full book review >
WILD ANIMALS OF THE NORTH by Dieter Braun
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"Amazing art makes this a browser's delight, but they should go elsewhere for solid information. (Picture book. 5-12)"
An oversized album of 80 common and lesser-known wild animals from three northern-hemisphere continents, identified by common and Latin names. Read full book review >
ROY'S HOUSE by Susan Goldman Rubin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"Today's kids will not be particularly shocked by the iconoclastic aspects of pop art, as was Lichtenstein's contemporary audience, but his artwork has an enduring appeal. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The pop-art movement of the 20th century is revived in this modern compilation of works by Lichtenstein, who died in 1997. Read full book review >
LOLA KNOWS A LOT by Jenna McCarthy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"By the end, there's no doubt in anyone's mind that Lola's learned the most important thing of all: she's 'ready to learn all the things I still don't know.' (Picture book. 4-8)"
A little girl starting school for the first time already knows a lot of things, but her big sister's got her worried others will know more. Read full book review >
LET ME FINISH! by Minh Lê
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"By the end, the relationship of tale to meta-tale is so unclear that readers may be left scratching their heads. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A light-skinned child with a zigzag thatch of brown hair and enormous spectacles searches for a quiet place to read. Read full book review >
STEAMBOAT SCHOOL by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"An unforgettable story that needs to be known. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A passion for education and freedom brings subversive ingenuity to life in 1847 St. Louis. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >