TIGER AND BADGER by Emily Jenkins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A very funny and fine tribute to a very young friendship. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Tiger and Badger are very young—maybe 4—and they are best friends, doing as best friends do. Read full book review >
WHOOPS! by Suzi Moore
by Suzi Moore, illustrated by Russell Ayto
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Full of fun and sure to evoke giggles, meows, bowwows, and squeaks. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Whoever heard of a cat that can't meow? Read full book review >

A BIG SURPRISE FOR LITTLE CARD by Charise Mericle Harper
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Check it out! (Picture book. 3-7)"
What will Little Card be? Read full book review >
WHAT ARE YOU GLAD ABOUT? WHAT ARE YOU MAD ABOUT? by Judith Viorst
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An unusually mixed bag. (Poetry. 6-10)"
The title of Viorst's latest collection of poetry for children provides an open invitation for readers not only to ponder feelings in general, but to examine their reactions to the assembled poems as well. Read full book review >
LITTLE CAT'S LUCK by Marion Dane Bauer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Excellent for young readers and all cat lovers. (Verse fiction. 7-12)"
This little cat's luck turns out to be dependent on the kindness of strangers, and that, most satisfyingly, connects back to her own unerring kindness. Read full book review >

LOUISE TRAPEZE DID NOT LOSE THE JUGGLING CHICKENS by Micol Ostow
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Louise is a feisty gal with the best of intentions. She just 'accidentally a-little-bit' messes everything up. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Louise Trapeze is back (Louise Trapeze Is Totally 100% Fearless, 2015), longing to be more mature than ever.Read full book review >
RAVENOUS by MarcyKate Connolly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A fantastical adventure fortified by its flawed heroine. (Fantasy. 8-14)"
Greta—one of the girls sold to Belladoma as fodder for the sea monster who threatens monthly floods in Monstrous (2015)—makes a dangerous deal with a witch to save her brother.Read full book review >
THE PRINCESS IN BLACK AND THE HUNGRY BUNNY HORDE by Shannon Hale
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"While not exactly novel, it's well-executed and very funny. (Fantasy. 5-7)"
The Princess in Black's cutest adventure yet—no, really, the monsters are deceptively cute. Read full book review >
THE EXTINCTS by Veronica Cossanteli
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A mostly enjoyable British import that should be better than it is. (glossary) (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Animals—mythical and extinct—abound in George Drake's hometown, Squermington. Read full book review >
BRAMBLEHEART by Henry Cole
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Nestled in a small trim size, this is an appealing and accessible genre blend. (Fantasy. 6-10)"
A young chipmunk finds his path. Read full book review >
BLOOM by Doreen Cronin
by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by David Small
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"If youngsters scratch their heads, take them to the yard or community garden to plant and make mud pies. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Cronin and Small combine talents in this fable for modern times: people who live in fragile kingdoms may need to get their hands dirty rebuilding. Read full book review >
NO, NO, GNOME! by Ashlyn Anstee
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A lighthearted glimpse into a hyperactive, impulsive tot's world and a possible learning tool to encourage social-emotional growth. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It's time to harvest the school garden, and a young gnome has difficulty controlling his excitement. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >