SWEEP UP THE SUN by Helen Frost
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"All-around gorgeous; Frost and Lieder again showcase the splendor of nature through the happy marriage of literal and figurative images. (Picture book/poetry. 2-8)"
A picture-book poem calling for adventure that's—thankfully—for the birds. Read full book review >
HIPPOS ARE HUGE! by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"The combined effect is a playful, clever introduction to the hippo that works for read-alouds or independent study. (index, author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Hippos are huge, graceful and dangerous, as depicted in this colorful, informative book for the youngest naturalists. Read full book review >

SMALL ELEPHANT'S BATHTIME by Tatyana Feeney
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Charming, brilliant in color and execution, and funny to even the most indignant foot stompers, NO! screamers and bathtime boycotters. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Small Elephant loves water—most of the time. Read full book review >
ROOM FOR BEAR by Ciara Gavin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Just ducky. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Creating a blended family demands a new choice in housing in Gavin's picture-book debut. Read full book review >
LITTLE BIRD TAKES A BATH by Marisabina Russo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Simple and understated—and all the more enjoyable for it. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In the decidedly urban setting that Little Bird calls his own, he wakes up with a song—he always starts his day with a song—and looks for a puddle for a bath after the unpleasantness of the nighttime rain. Read full book review >

FROGGY'S BIRTHDAY WISH by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Predictable fare to be sure, but series fans will likely follow Froggy wherever he goes. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In his 24th adventure, Froggy finally celebrates a birthday. Read full book review >
MAX'S MATH by Kate Banks
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Inventive. Bold. MAXimum fun! (Picture book. 3-8)"
Max is back in the fourth in his eponymous series of concept books. Read full book review >
I, FLY by Bridget Heos
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A breezy bucketful of buggy braggadocio, with tasty nuggets of well-digested natural history stirred in. (glossary, bibliography) (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
Why study boring old butterflies in school when there's a far buzzier insect on tap? A charismatic housefly eloquently states his kind's case. Read full book review >
I SEE A PATTERN HERE by Bruce Goldstone
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"A solid resource for both introducing and reinforcing patterns. (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
Goldstone tackles slides, turns, flips and folds in his latest, a look at patterning. Read full book review >
EDMUND UNRAVELS by Andrew Kolb
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"This long extended metaphor filled with laugh-worthy wordplay will comfort children and parents alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Edmund, a ball of teal yarn, explores the world but returns to his family. Read full book review >
TRICKY VIC by Greg Pizzoli
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"An appealingly colorful, deadpan account of a remarkably audacious and creative criminal. (glossary, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 7-9)"
Geisel winner Pizzoli turns from early readers to biography with this story of a consummate 20th-century con man. Read full book review >
TALKIN' GUITAR by Robbin Gourley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Aspects of visual discontinuity detract from this otherwise sensitive treatment of a celebrated guitarist's early inspirations. (biographical note, bibliography, list of websites) (Picture book/biography. 5-8)"
This affectionate portrait of guitar great Arthel "Doc" Watson focuses on his formative musical influences during his Appalachian childhood. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >