BUILDING AN IGLOO by Ulli Steltzer
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Despite that, Steltzer's text, photographs, and subject compel the imagination. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-8)"
With only a saw and a knife for tools, Tookillkee and his son Jopee build an igloo. Read full book review >
ROGER TORY PETERSON'S ABC OF BIRDS by Linda Westervelt
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

A noted ornithologist contributes some stunning full-color illustrations and photographs to a disappointing book that introduces one bird for almost every letter of the alphabet. Read full book review >

GIVING THANKS by Jake Swamp
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A simple, tender celebration of good fortune. (Picture book. 3-8)"
From the Iroquois, or Six Nations native people, comes Swamp and Printup's first picture book, an adaptation of the Mohawk Thanksgiving Address. Read full book review >
CAROLINA SHOUT! by Alan Schroeder
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"In his second collaboration with Schroeder (Ragtime Tumpie, 1989) Fuchs creates powerful oil paintings that beautifully celebrate the vitality of Charleston, and masterfully chronicle this vanished piece of African-American life. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An interesting cultural history of African-American street vendors in the preWW II South. Read full book review >
ANIMAL HULLABALOO by Jakki Wood
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Fun for little ones, especially just before or after a zoo trip. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The subtitle of this British import is a bit of a misnomer; the book begins with familiar barnyard and domestic animals at sunrise, then progresses to the African rainforest and savannah, to maritime regions and the Australian outback, and ends in North America at nightfall. Read full book review >

CAT AND RAT by Ed Young
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Inclusion of a page of horoscopes along with the Gregorian equivalents to the animals' years will intrigue readers, but the story may not keep them involved to the end. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
According to the notes at the beginning of the book, when the Chinese calendar was created, the animals ran a race, and the 12 who came in first had a year named after them. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Broad horizons, pale skies, and golden flowers combine with perky line drawings; the final pleasing touch is the muffin recipe. (Picture book/folklore. 5-10)"
Ernst (Squirrel Park, 1993, etc.) delivers again in this wacky midwestern take on a familiar tale. Read full book review >
STRONGHEART JACK AND THE BEANSTALK by Pleasant DeSpain
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Gail Haley's Jack and the Bean Tree (1986) is still the best choice for readers in search of an alternative to the many tellings aimed at a younger audience. (Picture book/folklore. 8-10)"
DeSpain (Eleven Turtle Tales, 1994, etc.) turns to the oldest known versions of this durable story for his retelling. Read full book review >
ONE WINTRY NIGHT by Ruth Bell Graham
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"For some readers, Graham's first children's book will be a gratifying alternative to the plethora of Christmas books that either avoid mentioning Jesus entirely or explain his birth and death in heavily devotional terms. (Picture book. 8-12)"
Handsome packaging wraps this long but readable account of the story and meaning of Christmas, as told by an old woman to a young boy during a snowstorm. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Many quotes from Reilly and the king of Swaziland make this quite accessible, inspiring fare. (pronunciation guide, index) (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
A contemporary African success story to please all budding conservationists. Read full book review >
I SPY SCHOOL DAYS by Jean Marzollo
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Yum. (Picture book. 3-8)"
This addition to the I Spy series of picture-riddles features vibrant full-color photographs of classroom toys and projects that entertain, challenge, and teach. Read full book review >
THE TANGERINE TREE by Regina Hanson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 21, 1995

"Tropical colors contrast perfectly with the somber tone of the tale and its undercurrent of hopefulness. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Hanson's entire bookher firstconsists of a masterful departure scene, shorter than a short story but lyrical in the extreme and resonating with broader overtones. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 5, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >