MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE by Marie Bradby
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Regardless, this is an immensely satisfying, accomplished work, resonating first with longing and then with joy. (Picture book. 5- 8)"
An inspiring story of young boy's compelling desire to read. Read full book review >
THE MOST AMAZING NIGHT BOOK by Robert Crowther
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Second, and an old problem at that, for institutional use: The book is not sturdy, and won't hold up to repeat viewings. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A cross between a book and a toy: Readers are invited to lift flaps, pull tabs, and turn wheels and watch windows open and close, trains and airplanes move, movies run, and Ferris wheels spin. Read full book review >

THE FLUTE PLAYER/LA FLAUTISTA by Robyn Eversole
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"As notes warble forth, his idiosyncratic shapes venture across skewed landscapes in vivid accompaniment to the words. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The slippery, undefinable beauty of the experience of listening to music is captured in this pleasant tale that bobs along like birdsong. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE SWINEHERD AND OTHER TALES by Paula Fox
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The whimsical, childish quality of the pictures nicely matches the text; the humor is dry and the poignancy understated. (Folklore. 8-12)"
Fables, first published in 1978, appear in a newly illustrated edition. Read full book review >
HEALTH
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A provocative concept; a wonderful read. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
A fascinating look into aspects of the natural world that are imperceptible to humans. Read full book review >

BEBOP-A-DO-WALK! by Sheila Hamanaka
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"As was true in the early works of Ezra Jack Keats, the child-heroes welcome every adventure before them; Hamanaka makes the journey uplifting and the road home safe. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A joy-filled celebration of an exciting and even nurturing urban landscape. Read full book review >
PORTRAIT OF A FARM FAMILY by Raymond Bial
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"An armchair field trip that brings home all the hard work involved in raising food, long before it hits the supermarket. (bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
Bial follows the Steidinger family from sun up to sun down, observing with clear full-color photos and text, life on a small dairy farm. Read full book review >
WITH ONE WHITE WING by Elizabeth Spires
HUMOR
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Blegvad's gentle watercolors plant clues and false leads with a light touch. (Picture book. 4-6)"
The answers to Spires's poetic puzzlesone riddle per pageare easy to guess, but there's still a lot to linger over and reflect on in this quietly humorous collection. ``When you leave I get bored/and pretend I'm a room,'' says the mirror; the candle's ``life is as long as an evening''; trees ``have black bones and pale green flesh'' and a starfish can ``never see what I am named after.'' There's an egg that's hardboiled about being ``cracked and beaten'' and a mosquito whose buzz is not worse than his bite. Read full book review >
THE PUPPY SISTER by S.E. Hinton
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"It's not the only gap in logic, but the story has the appeal of a good family read-aloud, regardless of its imperfections. (Fiction. 7-11)"
Can a puppy grow up into a girl? Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The straight-faced recounting of these far-fetched adventures is paced perfectly for a read-aloud; readers will yearn for Kellogg (who includes a careful source note) to hatch still more eggs from his storytelling basket. (Picture book/folklore. 6-10)"
A perennial favorite follows Kellogg's other tall tales (Mike Fink, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
THE TREE THAT WOULD NOT DIE by Ellen Levine
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island, 1993, etc.) steps back and lets the tree narrate its history from 1590 to the present, but the result is maudlin and sentimental; Rand's artwork, showing the tree over 400 years, simply doesn't achieve its usual heights. (Picture book. 8-10)"
``One morning hundreds of years ago, an acorn fell and grew in the earth. Read full book review >
THE PARENT THIEF by Mitra Modarressi
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Even though the illustrations clamor for a wrestle with childhood's dark side, the restraints are never loosened. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Something about the slant of Quinn's raised eyebrow lets readers know that he's not on the up-and-up when he invites Jack to stay at his house on Broomstick Island. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >