THE LITTLE SEVEN-COLORED HORSE by Robert D. San Souci
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Dicks's ethereal paintings- -sometimes awkward, sometimes moodily stylized—have a lovely, translucent quality that comes through in most scenes. (Picture book/folklore. 4-9)"
In source notes, San Souci (More Short & Shivery, 1994, etc.) explains that his tale has roots throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Read full book review >
NAVAJO ABC by Luci Tapahonso
ABC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Much care graces Tapahonso's debut, but it's bound to be misunderstood. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
``A DinÇ Alphabet Book'' is the subtitle of this attractive, confusing presentation of aspects of Navajo culture. Read full book review >

THE AMAZING CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA by David Shannon
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

The guileless Mr. Merriweather puts a string of lights around his window; when he is mocked by his neighbor, whose own house is covered with lights, Mr. Merriweather adds more decorations and within days has a display that people in three counties come visit. Read full book review >
CANTO FAMILIAR by Gary Soto
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Nelson debuts with scenes—homey, comfortable, bright—that make the book even more accessible. (Poetry. 8-12)"
This humorous, tender collection of 25 poems and full-color linocuts about the daily life of Mexican-American children is a companion book to Soto's Neighborhood Odes (1992). Read full book review >
SISTERS by Tricia Tusa
by Tricia Tusa, illustrated by Tricia Tusa
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Her people are lumpy, long, endearing and—memorable. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another warmly wacky book by the creator of Maebelle's Suitcase (1991). Read full book review >

DANCING ON THE BRIDGE OF AVIGNON by Ida Vos
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"As the senseless restrictions continue to rain down on the family, some sort of terrible duet emerges, of the small insults of childhood against the enormous backdrop of war. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Rosa, who is Jewish, and her family live in Holland during the Nazi occupation, trying to carry on as normally as possible while friends disappear and evermore restrictions are imposed on them. Read full book review >
LASSIE COME-HOME by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A timeless tale, handsomely turned out and made available at last, in its essentials, to younger readers. (Picture book 7-9)"
Eric Knights 1940 classic started out a short story; here Wells and Jeffers (Waiting For The Evening Star, 1993) bring it back to that length, enhanced with solemn, elegant artwork. Read full book review >
THE 13TH FLOOR by Sid Fleischman
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Whether climbing the ship's rigging in a storm or rescuing his sister from death by creating a pirate's ghost out of a codfish and a Walkman, Buddy is sturdy and unflappable, and his adventures are entertaining. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A tale of time travel, filled with Fleischman's trademark combination of humor and wild adventure. Read full book review >
DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >
I AM CHRISTMAS by Nancy White Carlstrom
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"These are obviously related to Joseph and Mary's trip to Bethlehem, but they might as well be generic Bible scenes somewhat romanticized: In one, a man in a monk's habit kisses a woman who may or may not be Mary, while the trees behind them swoon. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A religious picture book with a delightful conceit—taking words from the Scriptures (referenced in the back) and constructing a prose poem around them—that becomes tedious. Read full book review >
SANTA COW STUDIOS by Cooper Edens
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A good book for those with a cow fetish or fans of the previous titles; not to everyone's taste. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The Santa Cows (Santa Cows, 1991, etc.) return to give the Schwartz family a tour of Hollywood, playing out spoofs of familiar movies—Star Cows, Cowsablanca, and Jurassic Cows—and ending up in an extended parody: It's an Udderful Life. Read full book review >
MOOSES COME WALKING by Arlo Guthrie
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"There may be simple truths hidden between the lines, but even if there aren't, this is as finger-snapping catchy as Mother Goose with antlers. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Guthrie's first book is an endearing poem that is supposed to be about moose, but whose blithe rhymes have nonsense verse written all over them. ``Mooses come walking up over the hill./Mooses come walking, they rarely stand still.'' Only 12 lines long, the story is delivered a half-line at a time, complemented by acrylic paintings that have the simplicity of woodcuts in their bold black lines and even blocks of subdued color. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >