THE GIRL, THE FISH, AND THE CROWN by Marilee Heyer
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A lively story, with pictures that look like an open treasure chest. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another tale of transformations, about a girl who is turned into a fish and then promised by the queen of the fishes to be restored to her human form if she succeeds in retrieving a crown from a wicked giant. Read full book review >
THE FLYING SHIP by Andrew Lang
adapted by Andrew Lang, illustrated by Dennis McDermott
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"It's just not enough reason to give this rendition preference. (Picture book/folklore. 7-9)"
Aided by a platoon of magically talented companions found along the road, a simpleton has little trouble wresting the hand of a princess away from the grip of her reluctant father in this illustrated edition of a story from The Yellow Fairy Book. Read full book review >

THE HIPPO HOP by Christine Loomis
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A modest, preschool-sized helping of zoology enjoyably insinuated in verse to chant out loud. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The pace is swift and the mood upbeat in this be-bopping introduction to creatures both familiar and strange. Read full book review >
THE CRUMBLY COAST by David Lyon
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A satiric touch or two (the bears, for example, appoint a fact-finding commission to investigate the accusation of theft) spices this oddball offering. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A slightly surreal tale by Lyon (The Runaway Duck, 1985, etc.), about a sleuth and her mink sidekick on the trail of cookie thieves. Read full book review >
IF YOU SHOULD HEAR A HONEY GUIDE by April Pulley Sayre
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"An attractive, surprising, and useful volume. (Picture book/nonfiction 5-9)"
With outstanding care and restraint, Sayre (Grasslands, 1994, not reviewed, etc.) introduces this unusual bird and tells the story of symbiosis in a spare, poetic text that is also exciting for reading aloud. Read full book review >

THE LONG SILK STRAND by Laura Williams
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Fine story, beautiful art, superior bookmaking. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Though set in old Japan, this tale of intergenerational love and memory will be meaningful to any child who has been close to a grandparent. Read full book review >
LOOKING DOWN by Steve Jenkins
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"As with Banyai's Zoom (p. 220) and Re-Zoom (see review, above), Jenkins's original idea may have been to hurtle viewers in the direction he chose (in this case, ever closer to the scene), but the book reads equally well backwards. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Torn- and cut-paper collage pictures without words begin with a view of the earth from distant outer space and, with each turn of the page, zoom in toward the planet. Read full book review >
NATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The capable black-and-white illustrations range from realistic renderings of plants and animals to atmospheric scenes of exploration. (further reading, index) (Nonfiction 8-12)"
A selection of brief outdoor adventures in an appealing nature title. Read full book review >
MOUSE PARTY by Alan Durant
by Alan Durant, illustrated by Sue Heap
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

Finding an untenanted beachside villa, Mouse moves in and throws a bash. Read full book review >
DAY AND NIGHT by Maria Gordon
NATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Such sentences will be a little bald for some readers and just plain misleading for others. (further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 5-7)"
Simple explanations of complicated concepts (nocturnal and diurnal creatures, the rotation of the earth, etc.) are presented with colorful cartoons. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Parents won't mind reading this one out loud as many times as it's requested. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A delightful story of a dog who longs for a home of his own. Read full book review >
HOW I SPENT MY SUMMER VACATION by Mark  Teague
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Rip-roaring fun. (Picture book. 3-7)"
In an illustration bounded by neat white borders, Wallace Bleff writes ``How I Spent My Summer Vacation'' on the blackboard at school. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 5, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >