LOU GEHRIG by David A. Adler
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1997

"Readers will feel good after reading this biography—and maybe even inspired to start measuring themselves against Gehrig's standard. (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
The aw-shucks decency of Gehrig drives this picture-book biography from Adler (One Yellow Daffodil, 1995, etc.); what comes through is Gehrig as a genuine rarity, blessed with colossal athletic talent that he carried with dignity and modesty. Read full book review >
THE HOKEY POKEY by Larry La Prise
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Most children will want to dance, not read, but they will come away with a firm grasp of right and left. (Picture book. 2-6)"
While the Sun Valley Trio, the tune's originators, may no longer be household words, the Hokey Pokey has become a sort of goofy party classic that, since it was introduced in the 1950s, young and old can step to. Read full book review >

FLOOD by Mary Calhoun
by Mary Calhoun, illustrated by Erick Ingraham
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Although the home-is-where-the-heart-is message is heavy-handed, it's also enduring. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Wholesome family values are served up in this story of one family's survival of the great flood of the Midwest in 1993. Read full book review >
FLOATING HOME by David Getz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"What begins as a contrivance catapults readers into an animated, aeronautical adventure and an entertaining look at the science of space travel; it ends as a visionary paradigm for a peaceful planet. (Picture book. 5-9)"
In a unique slant on a typical homework assignment, Getz (Frozen Man, 1994, etc.) and newcomer Rex send a girl to incredible heights for her art project—outer space. Read full book review >
CORDUROY'S BIRTHDAY by B.G. Hennessy
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Call it a lift- the-flap, call it a birthday book, but don't call it Don Freeman's Corduroy (1968). (Picture book. 2-6)"
It's Corduroy's big day, and although he is pushing 30, he doesn't look a day over 5; in the years since his first appearance he has learned how to keep both straps of his overalls buttoned. Read full book review >

HAPPILY EVER AFTER by Anna Quindlen
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Some amusing twists don't conceal the tale's essential thinness. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 7-9)"
Quindlen (for adults, One True Thing, 1994, etc.) bows with this literary confection slightly reminiscent of Jay Williams's feminist fairy tales. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Regardless, it's balanced enough to be read to four-year-old flower girls, or to be read alone by junior bridesmaids. (Nonfiction. 4- 10)"
A book for a well-defined audience—girls looking forward to their first experience as a wedding attendant. Read full book review >
A LITTLE SALMON FOR WITNESS by Vashanti Rahaman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"Using a tight focus of faces, the illustrator highlights Rajiv, a compelling character lost within his own story. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Aaji, Rajiv's grandmother, fondly recalls having a piece of salmon ``for witness'' on Good Friday. Read full book review >
RUGBY & ROSIE by Nan Parson Rossiter
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"A resonant debut. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Rossiter's first book is a moving and informative account of a family and the puppy they raise for a year, until she is old enough to train to become a guide dog. Read full book review >
GINGER by Charlotte Voake
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"This is a simple tale, paced to perfection, while its parallels to the arrival of a new baby in a household give it a practical dimension. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A flawless tale of two cats, well-suited to story hours, to be read and reread. Read full book review >
I LOVE MY BUSY BOOK by Cyndy Szekeres
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Populated by wide-eyed, perennially cheerful animals, this book is no substitute for the wide range of titles (by Anne Rockwell, Byron Barton, and others) that turn concepts for preschoolers into high art. (Picture book. 2-6)"
This compendium of toddler basics—the alphabet, shapes, colors, rhymes, alliteration, emotions, manners, opposites, the body, dressing up, and numbers—is more of a product than a book. Read full book review >
THE KHAN'S DAUGHTER by Laurence Yep
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1997

"The jacket art is especially striking: A montage of acrylic on gold leaf shows Borte in a bejeweled headdress, Mîngke astride his sturdy pony at full gallop, and the wind-whipped banners and embroidered felt tents of the Khan's realm. (Picture book/folklore. 7-10)"
Yep (The Boy Who Swallowed Snakes, 1994, etc.) extends his series of picture-book retellings of Asian folktales with this Mongolian story of a poor young shepherd who wins the hand of the Khan's daughter through dumb luck and the smitten maiden's collusion. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >