J.B.'S HARMONICA by John Sebastian
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Perhaps best for readers not quite ready for chapter books. (Picture book. 4-8)"
James Bear has always wanted a harmonica, but when he gets one, and practice yields results, people compliment him with comparisons to Dad—an accomplished concert player. Read full book review >
MAYBE YES, MAYBE NO, MAYBE MAYBE by Susan Patron
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1993

"Pleasantly understated b&w art. (Fiction. 7-10)"
The author of two delightful picture books brings her witty, believable dialogue and awareness of children's preoccupations to a chapter book. Read full book review >

YO, HUNGRY WOLF! by David Vozar
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Irresistible for reading aloud. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Three well-known tales featuring the big bad wolf, retold in witty, rhythmic rap and cleverly linked. ``He blows at his foes till his lungs feel all tattered./The pigs feel exposed `cause their house has been scattered''—but though the wolf's ``got a plan/For house infiltratin','' he's a natty dresser who boggles at the soot in the chimney and sets out for ``Little Red's'' Grandma's in hopes of an easier meal. Read full book review >
KIPPER'S BIRTHDAY by Mick Inkpen
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Inkpen's clean, affectionately comical style. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Last seen in an imaginative counting book (Kipper's Toybox, 1992), the appealingly flop-eared little dog is back with a satisfying variation on the old birthday-party-confusion theme. Read full book review >
ANNA IS STILL HERE by Ida Vos
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"Still, a compelling book, even stronger than its fine predecessor. (Fiction. 8-14)"
The author of the autobiographical novel Hide and Seek (1991), based on her own WW II experiences, again uses linked vignettes to evoke the painful difficulties, after the war, of resuming a normal life. Read full book review >

JACK CREEK COWBOY by Neil Johnson
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1993

"An attractive, realistic portrayal of present practice in an occupation where, in the popular mind, the myths are still strong. (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
The author of several photo documentaries (All in a Day's Work, 1989) depicts two boys helping their ranch-hand dad herd cattle. Read full book review >
STELLALUNA by Janell Cannon
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Delightful and informative but never didactic: a splendid debut. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Attacked by an owl, Stellaluna (a fruit bat) is separated from her mother and taken in by a bird and her nestlings. Read full book review >
FIRE RACE by Jonathan London
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Afterword by Julian Lang, a member of the Karuk tribe; bibliography. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
The Yellow Jackets are known to keep fire on top of their snowy mountain; boldly, Coyote offers to ``make them pretty'' if they close their eyes. Read full book review >
FRIENDS FROM THE OTHER SIDE by Gloria Anzaldúa
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"An authentic portrayal; an excellent basis for discussion of an important issue. (Picture book. 4-10)"
A straightforward bilingual depiction of the variety of responses to Mexican ``illegals'' by Chicanos already living in Texas. Read full book review >
FAMOUS SEAWEED SOUP by Antoinette Truglio Martin
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"Nice. (Picture book. 3-7)"
In her first book, Martin structures a family visit to the beach around a clever inversion of ``The Little Red Hen.'' Nobody helps Sara make her soup of seaweed (two kinds), snails, and ``smelly stuff'' from a beachcombing—her parents are busy putting on sunscreen, fixing lunch, taking care of the baby, or reading. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1993

"A splendid setting for an important myth. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
Hero and mischief-maker Raven is central to Native American myths of the Pacific Northwest, as McDermott explains in a gracefully written note. Read full book review >
LADY DAISY by Dick King-Smith
Released: April 1, 1993

"A surprising subject for King-Smith—no farms, no animals- -but enjoyable. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When the Victorian doll Ned finds in Gran's attic speaks to him, it's the beginning of an unusual friendship. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >