BATWINGS AND THE CURTAIN OF NIGHT by Marguerite W. Davol
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"The text is on the long side, but children's fascination with animals in general and mysterious bats in particular will keep them enthralled. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A beguiling, original creation myth that explains why bats hang upside down in large groups. Read full book review >
PREMLATA AND THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS by Rumer Godden
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Illustrated with soft-focus, beautifully detailed black-and-white drawings, the book provides a whirlwind tour of one small corner of Bengal life, and is sure to find an audience ready for any story Godden tells. (Fiction. 7-10)"
A tender rags-to-riches tale from Godden (Great Grandfather's House, 1993, etc.), with an Indian setting and universal themes. Read full book review >

WATER DANCE by Thomas Locker
NATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Unlike Sky Tree, in which science facts were incorporated into the body of the text, the paintings don't illustrate the text in any true sense, but sit on the page. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Water in its many guises and the scientific process that commands the shape it takes—liquid, solid, and gas—are the subjects of this collection of paintings. Read full book review >
UH-OH! IT'S MAMA'S BIRTHDAY! by Naturi Thomas
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"Wholesome yet predictable. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The well-worn theme of finding the right birthday gift for one's mother is revisited in Thomas's first book. Read full book review >
DO COWBOYS RIDE BIKES? by Kathy Tucker
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"While children will enjoy the fluff, they won't come away with much to chew on from this heapin' helpin' of Old West nonsense. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Tucker and Westcott (Do Pirates Take Baths?, 1994, not reviewed) turn to the cowboy life in rollicking verse and pictures. Read full book review >

LADY MUCK by William Mayne
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"It please her from silk ear to scratch back' ''), though inventive, will turn off readers who have no sweet tooth for dialect. (Picture book. 5-9)"
From Mayne (Pandora, 1996, etc.), the arch tale of two pigs in search of swine ambrosia—truffles. Read full book review >
THIS IS THE BIRD by George Shannon
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"Soman's sensitive illustrations reflect the intimacy created by the memory of ancestral struggles and accomplishments; this is a moving tribute to familial bonds. (Picture book. 4-8)"
As a handmade wooden bird is passed down through several generations, each female relative endows it with a memory that adds to the family history. Read full book review >
THE CATS OF MRS. CALAMARI by John Stadler
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Great loony stuff. (Picture book. 3-6)"
From its title to its last page, absolutely inspired silliness from Stadler (Cat Is Back at Bat, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
LOU GEHRIG by David A. Adler
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1997

"Readers will feel good after reading this biography—and maybe even inspired to start measuring themselves against Gehrig's standard. (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
The aw-shucks decency of Gehrig drives this picture-book biography from Adler (One Yellow Daffodil, 1995, etc.); what comes through is Gehrig as a genuine rarity, blessed with colossal athletic talent that he carried with dignity and modesty. Read full book review >
THE HOKEY POKEY by Larry La Prise
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Most children will want to dance, not read, but they will come away with a firm grasp of right and left. (Picture book. 2-6)"
While the Sun Valley Trio, the tune's originators, may no longer be household words, the Hokey Pokey has become a sort of goofy party classic that, since it was introduced in the 1950s, young and old can step to. Read full book review >
FLOOD by Mary Calhoun
by Mary Calhoun, illustrated by Erick Ingraham
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Although the home-is-where-the-heart-is message is heavy-handed, it's also enduring. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Wholesome family values are served up in this story of one family's survival of the great flood of the Midwest in 1993. Read full book review >
FLOATING HOME by David Getz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1997

"What begins as a contrivance catapults readers into an animated, aeronautical adventure and an entertaining look at the science of space travel; it ends as a visionary paradigm for a peaceful planet. (Picture book. 5-9)"
In a unique slant on a typical homework assignment, Getz (Frozen Man, 1994, etc.) and newcomer Rex send a girl to incredible heights for her art project—outer space. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >