WATCH THE HOUSE by Susanne Santoro Whayne
ANIMALS
Released: June 30, 1992

"A good vocabulary-builder for intermediate readers. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Left along, five household pets (a Labrador, two cats, a guinea pig, and a canary) escape for an adventurous day outdoors, coping with an attacking hawk, a hostile porcupine, and a nest of hornets. Read full book review >
SOAP SOUP by Karla Kuskin
POETRY
Released: June 30, 1992

"The cheerfully unassuming illustrations, often interspersed with the words, make a perfect complement. (Poetry/Easy reader. 4-8)"
``Ice and cream./Sleep and dream./Some words seem/to go together,'' remarks Kuskin early in this casual-seeming but carefully crafted cycle of verses, whose ideas move as smoothly from one to the next as the ``Wind and weather'' on the first page. Read full book review >

NUMBERS AT PLAY by Charles Sullivan
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 18, 1992

"Full citations to the art, with brief but informative comments on the artists. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
In a counting-book companion to Sullivan's Alphabet Animals (1991), the numbers up to 10 as seen in works of art. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: June 15, 1992

"Index. (Nonfiction. 8- 11)"
More intriguing animal facts from Facklam (And Then There Was One: The Mysteries of Extinction, 1990), who here explains how scientists investigate animal communication, including body language, sounds, and chemical signals: in one case, a robot bee is programmed to waggle-dance, flap its wings, and secrete drops of sweetened water so that researchers can determine essential elements in bee communication. Read full book review >
JUNE IS A TUNE THAT JUMPS ON A STAIR by Sarah Wilson
POETRY
Released: June 10, 1992

"Nice. (Poetry/Picture book. 2-7)"
``It's a day for a cone,/for a plum/or a peach,/a warm- spoony day/for a run/on the beach,/where a ball/hits the clouds,/where the sky tips/the sea,/where we jump/for the water,/one, two, three!'' Thirty-one childlike poems about everyday things—weather, growing, seasons, night—as lighthearted and easily accessible as the author's illustrations of merry tots and their animal friends. Read full book review >

ANTICS! by Cathi Hepworth
ABC BOOKS
Released: June 3, 1992

"A delightful vocabulary expander. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Not truly an anthology—though the pun is forgivable—but an alphabet of words with the syllable ``ant'' (``Brilliant,'' ``Immigrants,'' ``Rembrandt,'' ``Xanthophile''), accompanied by imaginatively conceived ant characters: a slim, armored ``Gallant'' bowing to his monarch; ``Kant'' with pen and quizzically furrowed brow; a giant ``Mutant'' menacing an anteater; an ``Observant'' sleuth. Read full book review >
THE OLD MAN AND THE FIDDLE by Michael McCurdy
FICTION
Released: June 3, 1992

"As a cautionary tale, the point seems belabored, though McCurdy's sprightly verse is imaginatively phrased; best are his lively illustrations with their angular human and animal characters, the dramatic black of the engraving tinted with softer color. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An accomplished wood engraver adopts the form and scenario of ``The Arkansas Traveler,'' writing a mostly new ballad with a more complicated plot: not only does the man's roof leak, but ``His house was a shambles, the porch almost gone,/The yard was a sight, but the man fiddled on.'' Several neighbors, amusingly depicted in McCurdy's vigorous art, protest and try to help, but in the end it takes a flood to tidy up—a flood that takes the old man with it but fails to quench his spirit: on the last page, he's glimpsed fiddling from ``beyond the next hill'' (apparently the next life). Read full book review >
POPCORN PARK ZOO by Wendy Pfeffer
ANIMALS
Released: June 3, 1992

"Brief glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 8- 12)"
This unusual zoo in New Jersey takes in and cares for old, injured, handicapped, or unwanted animals, both wild and domestic. Read full book review >
THE SIMPLE PEOPLE by Tedd Arnold
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Simplistic and heavy-handed, but in the spirit of real contemporary concerns—a book that could contribute to thoughtful discussion. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The ``simple people''—depicted in Shachat's glowing mixed- media art as adult males whose pink, almost hairless heads constitute more than half their bulk—live happily, singing songs and eating fruit, until a serpent intrudes in the form of a first invention: Node makes a frame to look through. Read full book review >
BOOTS AND THE GLASS MOUNTAIN by Claire Martin
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 1992

"This Cinderella variant doesn't really need such a lush setting, but many will enjoy it. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A restructuring of Asbjornsen and Moe's ``The Princess on the Glass Hill.'' Martin modernizes the language, prunes descriptions and repetitions, and adds unnecessary explanations, a romantic source for Boots's tinderbox, and the threat of a troll groom if the princess's suitors fail. Read full book review >
RED FOX ON THE MOVE by Hannah Giffard
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1992

"As in Red Fox (1991), a slight plot is distinguished by well-designed, stylized illustrations in pleasing, bright colors. (Picture book. 3-7)"
After a bulldozer rousts Red Fox and his family from their home, they swim a river, brave a train tunnel, and try holes occupied by several other creatures before happening on one that is available for them to settle in. Read full book review >
SUSANNAH AND THE PURPLE MONGOOSE MYSTERY by Patricia Elmore
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"The jacket painting shows Susannah as African-American; other illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Third in a series of mysteries solved by a multiethnic trio of sixth-grade detectives in Oakland, California. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >