SOPHIE AND THE SIDEWALK MAN by Stephanie S. Tolan
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
An honest presentation of a contemporary problem, by an author who has explored moral issues with unusual insight in books for older children (A Good Courage, 1988). Read full book review >
THE BREMEN TOWN MUSICIANS by Jacob Grimm
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1992

"Both deserve a place in library collections. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Watts's soft, more traditional illustrations don't have the rambunctious zest of Wilhelm's (below), but they are appealingly pretty (in the best sense), representing the animals with sympathy, their defeat of the robbers with some humor, and the setting with a pleasant nostalgia. Read full book review >

HOANG BREAKS THE LUCKY TEAPOT by Rosemary K. Breckler
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1992

"A flawed effort. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Imagining a dragon in the steam behind his mother (``Ma''), a young Vietnamese hurls a ball at it, accidentally breaking a precious heirloom teapot that his family believes embodies their good luck. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: April 1, 1992

A gruesome tale that originally appeared in Cautionary Verses (1941)—a seriocomic fable along the lines of ``The Boy Who Cried Wolf''; the humor is in Belloc's spritely cadence and his preposterous exaggeration. Read full book review >
HERE COMES THE RECYCLING TRUCK! by Meyer Seltzer
NATURE
Released: April 1, 1992

"Useful. (Nonfiction. 4-8)"
The driver here may be unusual—she's young Elisa Seltzer; otherwise, this simple photo essay details a typical recycling scheme. Read full book review >

A TALL STORY AND OTHER TALES by Margaret Mahy
Released: March 31, 1992

"An inviting volume, a bit uneven but with much to amuse and enrich. (Short stories. 7-11)"
Eleven stories that first appeared in the 70's in The First, Second, and Third Margaret Mahy Story Books, apparently never distributed in the US. Read full book review >
THE GO-BETWEEN by Amy Hest
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 31, 1992

"Lexi must be seven or eight; the rather long text makes a good choice for independent readers of the same age. (Picture book/Young reader. 5-9)"
A satisfying child's-eye view of a November romance: Gram, who shares narrator Lexi's room, often sends Lexi with a pot of tea for Murray Singer, who runs the newsstand they can see from their window, across N.Y.C.'s Broadway; he sends back newspapers inscribed with his own cheery messages. Read full book review >
MAGGIE'S WHOPPER by Sally Hobart Alexander
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1992

"Still, a warmhearted vignette, attractively reflected in Ray's glowing generalized illustrations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Maggie, seven, who enjoys fishing with Great-uncle Ezra, hopes to outdo her older brother by catching a real ``whopper.'' Meanwhile, despite her uncle's reassurance, she worries about meeting old Thatch, a bear they've sometimes sighted near their pond. Read full book review >
WHEN GRAMPA KISSED HIS ELBOW by Cynthia DeFelice
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 31, 1992

"Grandpa share. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A gifted storyteller (The Dancing Skeleton, 1989) presents a familiar theme—a happy relationship between grandparent and child—with unusual insight and sensitivity. Read full book review >
MOTHER EARTH by Nancy Luenn
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1992

"An earnest paean that will appeal to many readers and can do only good. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Luenn's poetic text explores the title's image—``Mountains her bones/ Trees and plants her living hair/...Frogs and snakes are her sense of smell/ Insects her thoughts''—the metaphor is intriguingly applied, though it seems overextended. Read full book review >
DIRTY KURT by Mary Serfozo
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1992

"The ending here isn't quite as much fun as what precedes it; still, this good-humored exaggeration of a universal problem will make a delightful readaloud. (Picture book. 3-8)"
In merry, impeccably crafted verse, Serfozo (Who Said Red?, 1988) explains why Kurt can't seem to stay clean—``Soup shot from his spoon when he dressed in his best/to slide down his tie stripes and rest on his vest,'' or, ``Ice cream drip-dropped as it flopped from the cone/onto Kurt when the cone wasn't even his own.'' With a new school starting in the fall, Mom points out that ``they're just going to think you're a dirt ball with feet.'' After a day's pondering, Kurt comes up with an effective way to keep at least his clothes clean: he wears his raincoat! Read full book review >
A VISIT TO AMY-CLAIRE by Claudia Mills
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 31, 1992

"The warm, realistic story is beautifully visualized in Hamanaka's vibrant oils, where the appealingly expressive Japanese-American children appear in handsomely generalized settings with minimal detail. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Five-year-old Rachel happily anticipates a family visit to her cousin Amy-Claire, seven. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >