THE MAGIC WEAVER OF RUGS by Jerrie Oughton
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1994

A second Navajo myth from the team that collaborated on How the Stars Fell into the Sky (1992). Read full book review >
DARK CLOUD STRONG BREEZE by Susan Patron
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1994

"All in all, coming from an author and an illustrator with a number of fine books to their separate credit, a disappointment. (Picture book. 4-8)"
``Dark cloud strong breeze/Inside the car Daddy's locked his keys,'' begins this fanciful story of a mishap that balloons into an eventful sequence. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"An unusual story with real substance. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Written in 1829 and cited by Tolstoy as a childhood favorite, a complex tale with an intriguing mix of period setting and still-resonant message. Read full book review >
MRS. TOGGLE'S BEAUTIFUL BLUE SHOE by Robin Pulver
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"Simple and, by now, predictable; still, disarmingly lighthearted and funny. (Picture book. 4-8)"
``Overcome by spring,'' the ever-childlike Mrs. Toggle (Mrs. Toggle's Zipper, etc.) leaves the papers on her desk to join her class in kickball. Read full book review >
ELIZABETH IMAGINED AN ICEBERG by Chris Raschka
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"Still, these characters are distilled to a symbolic essence; by touching on children's secret fears, the dreamlike representation may help open them to discussion. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A daring but not wholly successful book from the innovative creator of Yo! Read full book review >

TIME TO WAKE UP! by Marisabina Russo
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1994

"The warm affection revealed in each step of the interaction is as evident in Russo's simple, bright pictures as it is in her brief text. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A disarming slice of real life: While Mom gently tries to urge him out of bed (``Open your eyes''), the little boy snuggles in, murmuring sleepy rejoinders (``Can I open just one?''). Read full book review >
A HOUSE BY THE SEA by Joanne Ryder
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"An attractive addition. (Picture book. 3-8)"
In verse that echoes both Milne's whimsical make-believe and the cadence of Poe's ``Annabel Lee,'' a child imagines living by the sea: playing with the seals (``When I got too wet/or they got too dry,/we'd hug and we'd run/and we'd yell, `Good-bye' ''); wishing on the moon; being cared for by an octopus (``With an arm doing this/and an arm doing that,/he'd cook and make my bed''); and so on. Read full book review >
I LOVE MY BUZZARD by Tres Seymour
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Pure fun. (Picture book. 4-9)"
An effervescent, kid-appealing parody of a popular folk song (``Yonder Tree''): An impish-looking boy details the delights of his bizarre pets (``I love my warthog and my warthog loves me./He blows his round nose on my sleeve./He borrows my toothpaste, my brush, and my floss./My mom has asked him to leave.'') Read full book review >
MRS. PEACHTREE AND THE EIGHTH AVENUE CAT by Erica Silverman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Zelinsky's The Story of Mrs. Lovewright and Purrless Her Cat (1985) would make a pungent contrast. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Even Mrs. Peachtree's name belies her gruff exterior, so it's no surprise when she and a persistent stray cat reach affectionate accommodation; but it is satisfying. Read full book review >
AROUND TOWN by Chris K. Soentpiet
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"A fine debut; an illustrator to watch. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Not every library will need this pictorial survey of New York City's simpler outdoor delights—an open hydrant on a summer day, street performers and vendors, chess in the park, feeding the pigeons—but it's worth noting that this new Korean-born illustrator is a promising student of mentor Ted Lewin's style (he thanks both Ted and Betsy Lewin for their guidance). Read full book review >
THE GENTLEMAN AND THE KITCHEN MAID by Diane Stanley
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"Share this pre-museum treat with the art teacher. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Scene: an elegant museum exhibit where a dapper gentleman (by Frans Hals or Rembrandt?) has long gazed affectionately from his frame at a wholesome lass with a basket of apples (typical Vermeer). Read full book review >
LILY by Abigail Thomas
by Abigail Thomas, illustrated by William Low
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Beautifully reflecting the simple story's mood, Low's art is rendered in richly shadowed pastels brightened by occasional patches of sun; he's especially creative in using points of view to emphasize Lily's uncertainty and sense of loss. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The trauma of moving as experienced by an appealing little black dog—an inspired take on this frequent topic, since it's truly impossible to tell Lily what's going on or to reassure her with explanations. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >