A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO BEAR SPOTTING by Michelle Robinson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Be sure to snuggle up to 'the stuffed kind' of bears and share this book with future Scaredy Squirrel series fans. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A handy story for little adventurers curious about the outdoor world. Read full book review >
PUNK SKUNKS by Trisha Speed Shaskan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Not a stinker, but no hit record either. (Picture book. 4-6)"
BSFs, best skunks forever! Maybe…. Read full book review >

TREE by Britta Teckentrup
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This unassuming story is an intergenerational delight. (Picture book. 3-10)"
Like the stealthy spider quietly spinning its web on a low bough, life around and on the apple tree is never static. Read full book review >
IT'S NOT EASY BEING NUMBER THREE by Drew Dernavich
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An acclaimed cartoonist in the adult world has created a solid hit for children. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When Number Three feels bored with being a number, he seeks other uses for his highly distinguishable shape. Read full book review >
ONE BIG FAMILY by Marc Harshman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 8, 2016

"Though joyful, this celebration of the American family is regrettably nostalgic. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Poet Laureate of West Virginia Harshman's anthem to extended families is a mellow catalog of togetherness. Read full book review >

WHO IS HAPPY? by Jarvis
by Jarvis, illustrated by Jarvis
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"Despite flaws, valuable practice at a crucial skill. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Young children get plenty of practice identifying 12 key emotions in this interactive question-and-answer book. Read full book review >
MARGUERITE'S FOUNTAIN by Rachel Elliot
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"A classic, traditional tale of heroine, villain, and hero—perhaps too traditional. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In this British picture-book melodrama, a dancing mouse named Marguerite is bullied by the rat Randolph and eventually rescued by the shy but heroic mouse Benjamin. Read full book review >
NEVER INSULT A KILLER ZUCCHINI by Elana Azose
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"All in all, more fun for the science-fair judges than the participants. (Picture book. 8-12)"
An alphabetical walk through the exhibits in a school science fair is the backdrop to one killer zucchini's vendetta. Read full book review >
THE WONDERFUL HABITS OF RABBITS by Douglas Florian
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Small and friendly. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Florian's whimsical poem is set against a plethora, indeed a veritable multitude, of rabbits. Read full book review >
SHADOW WRACK by Kim Thompson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A story whose idea has potential but that needs characters with real depth and a more complex and consistent plot to have impact. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
The peculiar residents of Eldritch Manor return. Read full book review >
SWEATERWEATHER by Sara Varon
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Varon shows a knack for both verbal and visual storytelling, but this showcase is likely to be of more interest to confirmed fans and budding graphic artists than to general readers. (Graphic short stories. 8-11)"
The graphic novelist updates her first solo collection (2003) with additional art, commentary, and minicomics. Read full book review >
SNAPPSY THE ALLIGATOR (DID NOT ASK TO BE IN THIS BOOK) by Julie Falatko
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"More than merely meta, Snappsy is clearly a book, if not a protagonist, with bite. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Picture Rita Skeeter as a chicken for a general sense of this book's goofy take on intrusive narration and one-sided reporting. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >