A BIRD IS A BIRD by Lizzy Rockwell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Widely useful, this should be a welcome addition to the nature shelf. (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
Birds have beaks and wings and begin as eggs, like some other animals, but only a bird has feathers. Read full book review >
PRICES! PRICES! PRICES! by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Adler always finds a canny way into the math game, both practical and enjoyable. (Math picture book. 6-10)"
You can spell math with an "a" as in angst, aghast or agog, or you can spell it with an "A" as in Adler. Your move. Read full book review >

GOOD NIGHT, KNIGHT  by Betsy Lewin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Clear text, amusing illustrations, and a captivating easy-to-read story make this a winner for horse-loving emerging readers. (Early reader. 4-6)"
Knight and Horse follow their dreams— literally. Read full book review >
3, 2, 1, GO! by Emily Arnold McCully
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A sure hit. (Early reader. 3-8)"
In the newest of her early readers, McCully (Little Ducks Go, 2014) nails a common childhood scenario: a twosome is playing school and won't let a third play. Read full book review >
AH! by Géraldine  Collet
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Creepy and uncomfortable—rather like discovering that a spider is riding on your head. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rabbit and a spider engage in a strange adventure. Read full book review >

OUTDOOR OPPOSITES by Brenda Williams
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"An ebullient book with catchy, rhyming text that's fun to read again and again at home, in the classroom or under a tree. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Poet Williams interprets the concept of opposites in a clever, rhyming book celebrating the outdoors. Read full book review >
HIT & MISS by Derek Jeter
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"An altogether trite, values-driven star vehicle—worthy of purpose but aside from occasional game action, as dull as a rain delay. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Fourth-grader "Derek" works his way through a batting slump, pulls an outsider into his circle of friends, and atones for being a bully in this semiautobiographical sequel co-authored by the recently retired Yankees captain. Read full book review >
FISH FOOD by Andy Mansfield
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"A long way from 'nature red in tooth and claw'—at this length, it's merely a snack—but still, there's a worthwhile nugget of informational nutrition. (Pop-up picture book. 4-6)"
A quick trip up an aquatic food chain, with pop-up predators. Read full book review >
ENORMOUS SMALLNESS by Matthew Burgess
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"An eminently friendly introduction to both the poet and his spirit—deceptively simple, just like its subject. (Picture book/biography. 6-10)"
A picture-book biography of the poet, with appropriately quirky multimedia illustrations. Read full book review >
PIP BARTLETT'S GUIDE TO MAGICAL CREATURES by Jackson Pearce
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"It's a distinct change of pace for two authors better known for intensely romantic teen fantasies, but they carry it off with aplomb. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
Magical animals abound in Pip's world, and she loves them all—especially since she can talk to them. Read full book review >
IN THE WAVES by Lennon Stella
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"As celebrity-authored books go, it could be worse. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Frothy fun from the Stella sisters, musicians and child stars of the TV series Nashville.Read full book review >
BE A STAR! by Heather Alexander
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 28, 2015

"Girls who love sparkles could do far worse than to spend time with these appealing performers. (Fiction. 6-9)"
The Stardust Girls return for a second circus-friendship tale. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >