ANATOLE by Eve Titus
Kirkus Star
by Eve Titus, illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 1, 1956

"But the circumstances under which he carries out his project—to live up to his social responsibilities—have an unmistakable French savoir faire."
The logical thing for a mouse, especially a French one, to do is to taste cheese—as Anatole does. Read full book review >
A TREE IS NICE by Janice May Udry
Released: June 15, 1956

"Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item."
A nursery school approach to a general concept. Read full book review >

BEYOND THE PAWPAW TREES by Palmer Brown
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 20, 1952

"Limited—I should think."
This is a reissue, with addition of verses devoted to Edward VIII and George VI. Read full book review >
THE ABANDONED by Paul Gallico
Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"A deep knowledge of cat lore and legend, feline psychology and behavior aims this toward a cat-loving audience, while its message of loneliness and love will find a reception among those who have a feeling for sentiment. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The story of Peter, 8, who in delirium after an accident, lived the life of a cat, offers a challenge to the storyteller's art—a challenge which is met with a certain amount of success. Read full book review >

FOG MAGIC by Lynd Ward
Released: Sept. 1, 1943

"This will appeal to children of fairy tale age and older."
A story of a secret world—such a world as every child should have—and of how the gift of that world remained as part of growing up. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 2, 1939

"And he has made delightful pen and ink illustrations. (Fantasy/historical fiction. 7-12)"
Hugely entertaining (and enlightening) mouse-eye view of the career of Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1933

"Famous historical characters."
Better for the American public than KINGS AND QUEENS, and just as good from every other angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >