A TREE IS NICE by Janice May Udry
Released: June 15, 1956

"Here's your first book for Arbor Day use- a good spring and summer item."
A nursery school approach to a general concept. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE PAWPAW TREES by Palmer Brown
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >

Released: Feb. 20, 1952

"Limited—I should think."
This is a reissue, with addition of verses devoted to Edward VIII and George VI. Read full book review >
THE ABANDONED by Paul Gallico
Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"A deep knowledge of cat lore and legend, feline psychology and behavior aims this toward a cat-loving audience, while its message of loneliness and love will find a reception among those who have a feeling for sentiment. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The story of Peter, 8, who in delirium after an accident, lived the life of a cat, offers a challenge to the storyteller's art—a challenge which is met with a certain amount of success. Read full book review >
FOG MAGIC by Lynd Ward
Released: Sept. 1, 1943

"This will appeal to children of fairy tale age and older."
A story of a secret world—such a world as every child should have—and of how the gift of that world remained as part of growing up. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 2, 1939

"And he has made delightful pen and ink illustrations. (Fantasy/historical fiction. 7-12)"
Hugely entertaining (and enlightening) mouse-eye view of the career of Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1933

"Famous historical characters."
Better for the American public than KINGS AND QUEENS, and just as good from every other angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >