THE ABANDONED by Paul Gallico
Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"A deep knowledge of cat lore and legend, feline psychology and behavior aims this toward a cat-loving audience, while its message of loneliness and love will find a reception among those who have a feeling for sentiment. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The story of Peter, 8, who in delirium after an accident, lived the life of a cat, offers a challenge to the storyteller's art—a challenge which is met with a certain amount of success. Read full book review >
FOG MAGIC by Lynd Ward
Released: Sept. 1, 1943

"This will appeal to children of fairy tale age and older."
A story of a secret world—such a world as every child should have—and of how the gift of that world remained as part of growing up. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 2, 1939

"And he has made delightful pen and ink illustrations. (Fantasy/historical fiction. 7-12)"
Hugely entertaining (and enlightening) mouse-eye view of the career of Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1933

"Famous historical characters."
Better for the American public than KINGS AND QUEENS, and just as good from every other angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >