BEYOND THE PAWPAW TREES by Palmer Brown
Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 20, 1952

"Limited—I should think."
This is a reissue, with addition of verses devoted to Edward VIII and George VI. Read full book review >

THE ABANDONED by Paul Gallico
Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"A deep knowledge of cat lore and legend, feline psychology and behavior aims this toward a cat-loving audience, while its message of loneliness and love will find a reception among those who have a feeling for sentiment. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The story of Peter, 8, who in delirium after an accident, lived the life of a cat, offers a challenge to the storyteller's art—a challenge which is met with a certain amount of success. Read full book review >
FOG MAGIC by Lynd Ward
Released: Sept. 1, 1943

"This will appeal to children of fairy tale age and older."
A story of a secret world—such a world as every child should have—and of how the gift of that world remained as part of growing up. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 2, 1939

"And he has made delightful pen and ink illustrations. (Fantasy/historical fiction. 7-12)"
Hugely entertaining (and enlightening) mouse-eye view of the career of Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 1, 1933

"Famous historical characters."
Better for the American public than KINGS AND QUEENS, and just as good from every other angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >