Released: Sept. 1, 1954

"Unhackneyed, this is as colorful as it sounds and much glitters besides the gold."
In a setting that could be the South, Florida or Georgia maybe, here is a fantasy that shimmers like its own sunny surroundings. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 20, 1952

"Limited—I should think."
This is a reissue, with addition of verses devoted to Edward VIII and George VI. Read full book review >

THE ABANDONED by Paul Gallico
Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"A deep knowledge of cat lore and legend, feline psychology and behavior aims this toward a cat-loving audience, while its message of loneliness and love will find a reception among those who have a feeling for sentiment. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The story of Peter, 8, who in delirium after an accident, lived the life of a cat, offers a challenge to the storyteller's art—a challenge which is met with a certain amount of success. Read full book review >
FOG MAGIC by Lynd Ward
Released: Sept. 1, 1943

"This will appeal to children of fairy tale age and older."
A story of a secret world—such a world as every child should have—and of how the gift of that world remained as part of growing up. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 2, 1939

"And he has made delightful pen and ink illustrations. (Fantasy/historical fiction. 7-12)"
Hugely entertaining (and enlightening) mouse-eye view of the career of Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 1, 1933

"Famous historical characters."
Better for the American public than KINGS AND QUEENS, and just as good from every other angle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >