THE POPCORN ASTRONAUTS by Deborah Ruddell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A scrumptious set of food-themed poems for budding gourmets, ripe for hours of read-aloud fun. (Picture book/poetry. 4-10)"
Ruddell's collection of 21 bite-sized poems whets even the littlest of literary appetites. Read full book review >
DRUM DREAM GIRL by Margarita Engle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A beautiful account of a young girl's bravery and her important contribution toward gender equality in the creative arts. (historical note) (Picture book. 3-8)"
Pura Belpré winner and Newbery honoree Engle, known for writing free-verse historical fiction, introduces readers to Millo Castro Zaldarriaga with this illustrated poem, inspired by her subject's childhood. Read full book review >

ORANGUTANKA by Margarita Engle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Listeners aping big sister's dance will hoot for a repeat. (Picture book/poetry. 4-8)"
Follow an orangutan family through a day in the wildlife refuge. Read full book review >
MEET THE DULLARDS by Sara Pennypacker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"When the siblings sneak out to join the circus, readers may hope that they never return. (Picture book. 4-8)"
All children wonder, at times, if parents make decisions solely to suppress fun; in this story, there is no doubt. Read full book review >
SUPERCAT VS. THE FRY THIEF by Jeanne Willis
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Gentle, occasionally funny furry adventures for those just ready for chapter books. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Have no fear, Supercat is here! Read full book review >

FRANK EINSTEIN AND THE ELECTRO-FINGER by Jon Scieszka
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"There's so much actual information here that the story could pass as a textbook, but science and Scieszka fans won't likely mind. (Science fiction/humor. 8-10)"
Kid genius Frank Einstein's back for a second shocking (and silly) science adventure. Read full book review >
SEAVER THE WEAVER by Paul Czajak
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A salutary tribute to the benefits of thinking outside the orb. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A web designer of the eight-legged sort experiments with geometric shapes in the face of pressure from his many conformist sibs. Read full book review >
SALSA by Jorge Argueta
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Ummm, a delicious companion to Argueta's Tamalitos (2013, illustrated by Domi), Guacamole (2012, illustrated by Margarita Sada) and his other poemas para cocinar. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Music, dancing and food unite in this giddy bilingual whirl. Read full book review >
WORK AND MORE WORK by Linda Little
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Stylized and idealized but with some potential as a discussion starter. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A young traveler discovers a world of wonders hidden in a seemingly ordinary word. Read full book review >
SIDEWALK FLOWERS by JonArno Lawson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Bracketed by beautiful endpapers, this ode to everyday beauty sings sweetly. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A child in a red hoodie and a man on a cellphone navigate an urban landscape, the child picking flowers from cracks and crannies along the way. Read full book review >
NIGHT CIRCUS by Etienne Delessert
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Children who have not yet gained a sense of irony will particularly enjoy the seemingly random but carefully delineated juxtaposition of image and idea. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A modern master of surrealism presents an astonishing traveling circus. Read full book review >
THE SCHNOZ OF DOOM by Andrea Beaty
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Armageddon-averting fun for fans of Jon Scieszka's Spaceheadz and M.T. Anderson's Pals in Peril. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Can Earth again be in peril from extraterrestrial bunnies? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >