COMPLETELY CLEMENTINE by Sara Pennypacker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Though looser in weave than previous appearances, still this provides the emotional honesty readers have come to expect. (Fiction. 6-10)"
Antic third-grader Clementine faces her biggest challenge yet: looming change. Read full book review >
MY WILDERNESS by Claudia McGehee
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A taste of wilderness of yore to whet the appetites of future fans of Laura Ingalls Wilder, Louise Erdrich and Kirkpatrick Hill. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
"When I was nine years old, I lived one winter on Fox Island, with my father, an old trapper named Olson, six blue fox, a family of angora goats, and Squirlie. This is what happened." Read full book review >

FAREWELL FLOPPY by Benjamin Chaud
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Predictable and only mildly amusing; no need to hop to this one. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A boy tries to abandon his pet rabbit only to discover—surprise!—he can't live without him. Read full book review >
SLACKS, CAMERA, ACTION! by Scott McCormick
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Mildly amusing bratty antics—but nothing more. (Graphic novel. 6-10)"
Mr. Pants, his human mother and his feline sisters return for a second graphic-novel-format chapter book. Read full book review >
BREAKING THE ICE by Gail Nall
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"After a strong beginning, this atmospheric but overstuffed novel flounders, rallying at the end to pull off a touching finish. (Fiction. 8-12)"
An emotional meltdown at a figure skating competition gets 12-year-old Kaitlin kicked out of her high-status skating club and jettisoned by her longtime coach in this middle-grade sports novel. Read full book review >

FIRSTBORN by Tor Seidler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A rich tale of the wild that quickens the pulse and fills the heart. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
A magpie who befriends a wolf tells their story. Read full book review >
POWER DOWN, LITTLE ROBOT by Anna Staniszewski
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Riddled with robotic terms, this bedtime story is clearly one-note, but it's still charming enough to earn fans of all youngsters who engage in bedtime battles. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This little red robot will do anything to avoid going to sleep. Read full book review >
FLOWERS ARE CALLING by Rita Gray
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Although it has some textual flaws, this quiet, introspective work beckons readers to keenly observe. (fact page, website) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Verse alternates with facts about pollinators, depicted with their preferred flowering plants. Read full book review >
EGG by Steve Jenkins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Appealing, accessible and accurate, this is another admirable creation. (additional reading) (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
With their characteristic design and choice of intriguing details, this prolific author-illustrator pair introduces "nature's perfect package": the egg. Read full book review >
GEMMA & GUS by Olivier Dunrea
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A just plain ducky addition to this excellent picture-book series. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Gosling siblings explore their world in this latest offering from Dunrea's Gossie & Friends series. Read full book review >
GUS by Olivier Dunrea
by Olivier Dunrea, illustrated by Olivier Dunrea
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Good to meet you, Gus. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Gus is a welcome addition to the Gossie & Friends series. Read full book review >
STONE ANGEL by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A different take on a difficult subject. (Picture book. 8-10)"
A young Jewish girl and her family must flee when the Nazis march into Paris. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >