FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Jacket art depicting a 'corpse' viewing the frightened kids from within the viewing window is a sure draw—though it hints at the outcome. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Another mystery/farce involving the idiosyncratic Magruder family (The Bodies in the Bessledorf Hotel, 1986, etc.). Read full book review >
BECAUSE SHE'S MY FRIEND by Harriet Sirof
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"A strong book, with gritty characters, interesting problems, and a believable outcome. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Nobody would have predicted that Valerie Ross (uptown Manhattan sophisticate, superior Hunter High student, gutsy product of affluent, divorced, career-minded parents) and Teresa D'Angelo would become friends. Read full book review >

FROM MISS IDA'S PORCH by Sandra Belton
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"List of biographies, recordings, and two videotapes. (Fiction/Young reader. 7-10)"
``You can know where you're going in this world only if you know where you've been!'' Addressing adults as much as children, the narrator fondly recalls the sights and sounds of her neighborhood, especially Miss Ida's porch, a ``telling place'' where one summer night she heard old Mr. Fisher recall the time Duke Ellington himself came to stay because no hotel in town would have him. Read full book review >
BLOOMERS! by Rhoda Blumberg
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"In lively prose supported by Morgan's subtly amusing watercolors, Blumberg (Commodore Perry in the Land of the Shogun, 1985, Newbery Honor) tells the youngest readers how the infancy of the women's rights movement put a twist in the knickers of American history. (Picture book. 5-10)"
On seeing friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton's trousers, Amelia Bloomer ``decided that women needed freedom not only from drunken husbands but also from cumbersome, crippling clothes.'' As with any revolutionary style change, ``bloomers,'' named for the editor of a women's journal, The Lily, shocked the public. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A brief discussion of the causes of extinction (hunting, habitat destruction, pollution, etc.), followed by units focused on continental regions and their special problems, each introducing 20 or so ``endangered'' or ``threatened'' animals (terms the author never defines), with color photos or illustrations of each animal, a few facts, common and scientific names, and size. Read full book review >

ODDS 'N' ENDS ALVY by John Frank
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"But audacious print treatment doesn't make up for the story's triviality, while the hooliganism of its logic (the desk stops at Alvy's door but not for a speeding train) will make readers ready to abandon the rickety ride. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Alvy has a reputation as transformer of salvaged objects; still, his classmates are astonished when his souped-up desk zooms away during recess. Read full book review >
THE BIG STORM by Bruce Hiscock
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Attractive and, in light of recent events, well timed. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 5-10)"
March 1982 went out like a raging lion: from March 31 to April 6, an enormous storm swept across the US, causing blizzards and avalanches in the Rockies, tornadoes on the Great Plains, torrential downpours in the Appalachians, and the first April snowstorm ever recorded in N.Y.C. In colorful illustrations, easily understood maps and diagrams, and a brief, instructive text, Hiscock depicts the storm's path and the forces that created and nourished its short but destructive life. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"An entertaining contemporary story that will find a ready audience. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Another of Jonah Twist's third-grade classmates is featured in Honeycutt's series about a San Francisco neighborhood with the kind of lively kids, nice parents, and pervasive common sense and good humor that distinguish Cleary's Klickitat Street. Read full book review >
THE TOWER ROOM by Ellen Howard
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"It doesn't quite ring true that the other girl knows about the abortion, or that Aunt Olive doesn't know of the second entrance into the tower; but those are small flaws in an unusually engaging story with a real heartwarmer of a conclusion. (Fiction. 9-12)"
After her mother's death in 1953, fifth-grader Mary Brooke comes to share the family home with Aunt Olive, who's been living there alone. Read full book review >
MOOSE AND FRIENDS by Jim Latimer
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Whatever the reason, this ingenuous, peculiarly American whimsy—with Ewing's affectionate watercolor characterizations as the perfect complement—continues to delight. (Young reader. 6- 10)"
It's hard to explain the charm of Latimer's stories about Moose (this is the third collection). Read full book review >
HERE COMES THE MYSTERY MAN by Scott Russell Sanders
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"A joyful evocation of a past when any visit was a special occasion, and steamboats were only a peddler's tale. (Picture book. 7-10)"
From the team that created Warm As Wool (1992), another happy episode in the pioneer Midwest. Read full book review >
THE WAINSCOTT WEASEL by Tor Seidler
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Twenty-one of the 50 elegantly rendered illustrations are in full color; Marcellino's gracious compositions, delicate modeling, and amiable characterizations are in perfect tune with the engagingly imaginative story. (Fiction. 9-12)"
In the gentle spirit of Seidler's A Rat's Tale (1986), a fantasy set on eastern Long Island in a well-established woodland community of weasels. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >