THE SUB by P.J. Petersen
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-10)"
When the substitute walks in, James and Ray quickly decide to switch desks and identities—but the joke turns as sour as the smells from Ray's garbage-filled desk when James finds himself blamed for his friend's high jinks and poor schoolwork. Read full book review >
THE BIG NIGHT OUT by Thor Wickstrom
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Lighthearted and funny, a book to try with older groups as well as preschoolers. (Picture book. 4-10)"
In the first book he's not only written but illustrated, Wickstrom adopts an exuberant verse form, echoing Lear's ``The Owl and the Pussycat,'' to describe the partying of a mouse, a goose, and a ``bear [who] wore a cape he had sewn from a drape,/ With a monocle and a cravat./ (What a dude!)/ With a monocle and a cravat!'' When they leave the uptown club where they've been carousing (over milk and juice), they're broke; rather than trudging home, they beg a ride on a friend's boat. Read full book review >

FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1993

From a popular Australian writer, nine more stories in a follow-up to Uncanny! and Unreal! Read full book review >
THE PRIVATE NOSE by Andrew Taylor
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Accessible language and the story format make this an equally good choice for reading aloud or for encouraging reluctant readers. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Jack Watson has never heard of Sherlock Holmes until a new girl moves in next door; her name is Saturday Holmes; and since she has a ``nose'' for solving mysteries, she loves practicing her skills as a detective. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1993

"List of organizations; glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 9- 12)"
First in ``The Great Naturalists'' series: a portrait of a woman who has been observing Borneo's orangutans and championing their preservation since 1971. Read full book review >

A VISIT TO THE BIG HOUSE by Oliver Butterworth
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1993

"Avishai's soberly realistic drawings are warm and sympathetic. (Fiction/Young Reader. 7-10)"
Rose (7) and Willie (5) are apprehensive: Dad has been in prison for a month, and Mom is taking them to see him for the first time. Read full book review >
THE TWELVE CIRCUS RINGS by Seymour Chwast
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Ingeniously constructed and designed with panache: a delightful addition to the genre. (Picture book. 3-9)"
The graphic designer who created The Alphabet Parade (1991) returns with an even more ebullient counting book patterned on ``The Twelve Days of Christmas'': ``In the fifth circus ring, my sister saw with me five dogs a-barking, four aerialists zooming, three monkeys playing, two elephants, and a daredevil on a high wire''—and so on, each spread exhibiting, for each of the numerals, new acts and performers, all of whom the reader is challenged to add up, variously, at the end. Read full book review >
MY NAME IS BRAIN/BRIAN by Jeanne Betancourt
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Packaged with earnest intent and a somewhat pat outcome, but still a skillfully structured, entertaining story; Brian himself, struggling to redefine himself in terms of his newly discovered potential, is drawn with real insight. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Brian starts school hoping to do better this year, only to mess up by misspelling his own name the first day. Read full book review >
SPIDERS NEAR AND FAR by Jennifer Owings Dewey
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Twenty-three species, in soft color-pencil drawings and an informative text describing anatomy, life cycle, and habits. Read full book review >
NEVE SHALOM/WAHAT-AL-SALAM: OASIS OF PEACE by Laurie Dolphin
NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Glossary; comparison of words common to Hebrew and Arabic. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
In a remarkable community outside Jerusalem, 20 families—Jews and Arabs—demonstrate the possibility of peaceful coexistence, working and living together in a cooperative village that is seen here through the eyes of two ten-year-olds, a Jewish boy and an Arab, among the first from outside the village to be admitted to its bilingual, bicultural school. Read full book review >
PETEY AND MISS MAGIC by N.B. Dorman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"The same could be said of this book. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Petey's a grade-school charmer who so aches for a pet that he even considers, briefly, adopting the weevils that have infested his mother's cornmeal. Read full book review >
MISERY GUTS by Morris Gleitzman
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Each book stands alone, but they're stronger and more interesting as an easily read, genuinely funny two-part novel, lively with offbeat incidents and repartee. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Keith, who barely remembers when he last saw his parents smile, is determined to cheer them up, but his exaggerated efforts are as inappropriate as they are well intentioned: Mum and Dad are devastated to find their fish-and-chips shop painted with Tropical Mango Hi-Gloss (intended as a maximum contrast to London's fog), and automatically reject his proposals for a South Sea vacation—or a move to Australia's tropical coast. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >