TREASURES IN THE DUST by Tracey Porter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"But the real legacy is spirit and heart amidst hardship, which readers, are sure to appreciate. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Set during a severe 1930s drought and recalling the ambience and incidents of The Grapes of Wrath, this Dust Bowl novel chronicles the plights of two families, told from the points of view of two best friends who narrate alternating chapters. Read full book review >
MEAN MARGARET by Tor Seidler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"Advanced readers may perceive an edge beneath the drollery, but it's all in good fun. (Fiction. 9-11)"
A fastidious woodchuck discovers parenthood to be worse than his wildest imaginings in this benign, if sardonic, animal tale from Seidler (The Wainscott Weasel, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

MOONSTICK by Eve Bunting
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"Expertly and beautifully told. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Bunting (The Pumpkin Fair, p. 947, etc.) turns a sensitive eye to Sioux culture, depicting it truthfully and realistically while incorporating into the book a heartening message to any child whose ancestral ways have passed (even temporarily) into obscurity. Read full book review >
BETCHA! by Stuart J. Murphy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"Readers may come away with the sense that they are not slaves to numbers—it's the other way around. (further reading) (Picture book. 6-9)"
Playing with numbers—that's what this book from Murphy (The Best Vacation Ever, 1997, etc.) is all about. Read full book review >
JULIE'S WOLF PACK by Jean Craighead George
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"The wolf's-eye view will draw new readers to the books, but fans of the first books, already well-versed in wolf society, may find many of the situations repetitive. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Completing the switch in narrative view begun in Julie (1994), the sequel to Julie of the Wolves (1972), George continues her tale of the Avalik River pack entirely from the standpoint of its members: Kapu, the young new alpha; his daughter and successor, Sweet Fur Amy; Ice Blink, a lone wolf who carries rabies—and Willow Pup Julie, who lives in town but puts in appearances to inspect new pups or perform rescues. Read full book review >

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"A somewhat superficial background note is appended, which wrongly implies that the legend of the phoenix is a Japanese story, when it is actually found in many cultures. (Picture book. 7-9)"
In this original tale of a mute birdcatcher who nets a phoenix and saves his village from a bandit, Lattimore (Arabian Nights, 1995, etc.) shows little of the zeal for authenticity and depth of research that characterize her other works. Read full book review >
SIX HAUNTED HAIRDOS by Gregory Maguire
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"Maguire's wit sometimes slips its leash, but the climax is sidesplitting and the gender rivalry thoroughly skewered, although the heartwarming ectoplasmic adoption scene prompts a Thanksgiving Day truce between the factions. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 10-12)"
Having survived an influx of giant, poisonous Siberian snow spiders (Seven Spiders Spinning, 1994), the rival boys and girls of Miss Earth's class in Hamlet, Vermont, face another set of prehistoric critters: a herd of ghost mammoths hunting through the centuries for a misplaced youngling. Read full book review >
SACAGAWEA by Judith St. George
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"Dinner was spoiled elk, roots and rotten fish'') and supported with a sturdy bibliography (although no specific citations). (maps, not seen) (Biography. 11-13)"
So little is known of Sacagawea's life before or after the Lewis and Clark Expedition that its story and hers are virtually the same, but St. Read full book review >
THE SEVEN SONGS OF MERLIN by T.A. Barron
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"A rich and resonant read. (Fiction. 9-12)"
This second installment of the sequence that began with The Lost Years of Merlin (1996) is as full of action and excitement as its predecessor, but is kinder and gentler in tone; while its origins are epic, it is foremost a tale of the heart. Read full book review >
TAE'S SONATA by Haemi Balgassi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"Tae grows and learns, and gets the cute boy, which will satisfy those seeking light fare and no surprises. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Eighth-grader Taeyoung Kim feels torn between her Korean heritage and her new American culture. Read full book review >
THE SWAP by George Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"In Arthur, readers can acknowledge their own weaknesses, be reassured by their convictions, and witness the redemptive powers of humanity. (Fiction. 10-12)"
The schoolyard adventures of Arthur, 11, set against the background of northern England in the 1950s, form the anecdotal plot of this charming novel. Read full book review >
WILD HORSE SUMMER by Hope Ryden
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"Nevertheless, believable feelings combined with plenty of action build to a dramatic climax. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 9-14)"
Alison doesn't really want to spend the summer she turns 13 on a ranch in Wyoming with her cousin Kelly, who is blind. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >