BUTTON HILL by Michael Bradford
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Rare, scary fun. With tomatoes. (Horror. 11-13)"
A moment's messing with an odd clock plunges a lad into the strange and dangerous borderland between the living world and the realms of the dead in this decidedly offbeat chiller. Read full book review >
AN AMBUSH OF TIGERS by Betsy R. Rosenthal
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Collective nouns have never been this much fun…or memorable. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
Homonyms are used as mnemonic devices to help readers remember "A Wild Gathering of Collective Nouns." Read full book review >

THE FIRST CASE by Ulf Nilsson
Kirkus Star
by Ulf Nilsson, illustrated by Gitte Spee, translated by Julia Marshall
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"The only sadness is that Volume 2 isn't immediately available. (Mystery. 4-10)"
Who are the scurvy thieves loose in the woodland district? Read full book review >
LAUREN IPSUM by Carlos Bueno
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Positive, smart, empowering philosophies and thinking skills couched in a wacky adventure. (Fantasy/philosophy. 8-14)"
A lost girl travels through a fantastical Alice in Wonderland-esque world filled with The Phantom Tollbooth-like computer-programming metaphors.Read full book review >
SONA AND THE WEDDING GAME by Kashmira Sheth
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Everyone will want to attend this wedding. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Who would have thought that the bride's younger sister must steal the groom's shoes at an Indian wedding ceremony? Not Sona. Read full book review >

OCTOPUSES! by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Pringle inks another winner in a long series of engaging, informative invitations to explore the natural world. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
A veteran science writer introduces the most intelligent invertebrate of all, the octopus, master of camouflage. Read full book review >
THE LEAGUE OF BEASTLY DREADFULS by Holly Grant
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A yummy debut, though readers with sensitive stomachs would be well-advised to check them at the door. (Fantasy. 10-12)"
Two sinister spinsters spirit a seemingly ordinary fifth-grader away one day to a moldering former asylum, informing her that she's become an orphan and they are her great-aunts. Yeah, right. Read full book review >
THE POPCORN ASTRONAUTS by Deborah Ruddell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A scrumptious set of food-themed poems for budding gourmets, ripe for hours of read-aloud fun. (Picture book/poetry. 4-10)"
Ruddell's collection of 21 bite-sized poems whets even the littlest of literary appetites. Read full book review >
BLACKBIRD FLY by Erin Entrada Kelly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Children's literature has been waiting for Apple Yengko—a strong, Asian-American girl whose ethnic identity simultaneously complicates and enriches her life. (Fiction. 9-14)"
Apple Yengko has one possession from the Philippines—a Beatles cassette tape with her father's name written on it. She knows every song by heart. Read full book review >
MOON BEAR by Gill Lewis
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A moving and memorable tale of a boy and his bear. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Like Nâam-pèng, the bravest bee in a much-loved story, a boy faces a monster—bear-bile farming—and makes a difference. Read full book review >
THE WHISPER by Aaron Starmer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A riveting, imaginative, disconcerting, inscrutable, unresolved sequel, guaranteed to leave readers anxious for the finale. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
In this sequel to The Riverman (2014), 12-year-old Alistair Cleary travels to a parallel world searching for his missing friend, Fiona.Read full book review >
MY PEN by Christopher Myers
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 10, 2015

"Poignant, vulnerable, wise. (Picture book. 7-12)"
A boy describes everything his pen can do, from the literal to the metaphorical. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >