THE DAY NO ONE WAS ANGRY by Toon Tellegen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Pleasantly lacking moral-mongering, this fresh collection will appeal to parents and children who enjoy sharing stories as springboards to discussion and speculation. (table of contents—in the backmatter) (Short stories. 6-9)"
Dutch writer Tellegen explores the psychology of anger in 12 vignettes featuring a society of animals. Read full book review >
AN AMBUSH OF TIGERS by Betsy R. Rosenthal
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Collective nouns have never been this much fun…or memorable. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
Homonyms are used as mnemonic devices to help readers remember "A Wild Gathering of Collective Nouns." Read full book review >

THE MISSING ZUCCHINI by L.M. Falcone
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Introduce Max to budding detectives or children who like to laugh as they read. (Mystery. 6-10)"
Max and his great-uncle Larry, who just happens to be a bumbling ghost and a formerly unsuccessful detective, solve their second case in this accessible chapter-book series. Read full book review >
THE LOST TREASURE OF LITTLE SNORING by Lyn Gardner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Flashes of wit notwithstanding, the gross is shoveled in with such vigor that even readers who revel in such stuff may weary. (Adventure. 9-11)"
An intrepid lad and his smart-girl best friend repel a pair of particularly putrid pirates in this unbridled farce. Read full book review >
MY FAMILY TREE AND ME by Dusan Petricic
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Budding genealogists will enjoy poring over this illustrated family history. (Picture book. 4-9)"
This dos-à-dos book looks at both sides of one little boy's ancestry. Read full book review >

OCTOPUSES! by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Pringle inks another winner in a long series of engaging, informative invitations to explore the natural world. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
A veteran science writer introduces the most intelligent invertebrate of all, the octopus, master of camouflage. Read full book review >
TRASH MOUNTAIN by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Though there's a suggestion the story is meant as fable, Nutley's adventure stands alone as a satisfying animal fantasy. (Fiction. 8-11)"
When young Nutley's parents are attacked and killed by the violent members of an invading "inferior race" living nearby, Nutley must leave his babyhood home and learn to make it on his own. Read full book review >
BUTTON HILL by Michael Bradford
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Rare, scary fun. With tomatoes. (Horror. 11-13)"
A moment's messing with an odd clock plunges a lad into the strange and dangerous borderland between the living world and the realms of the dead in this decidedly offbeat chiller. Read full book review >
LOST IN THE BACKYARD by Alison Hughes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"A simple, predictable survival adventure. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Lost in the woods for three long, cold days, Flynn makes several mistakes that hinder his rescue and survival. Read full book review >
SOMETHING SURE SMELLS AROUND HERE by Brian P. Cleary
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Inviting illustrations and offbeat topics showcase limericks aplenty for amusement or poetic inspiration. (further reading) (Picture book/poetry. 6-11)"
Cleary presents 26 limericks (and, tantalizingly, half of a 27th) for kids. Read full book review >
THE FRAIL DAYS by Gabrielle Prendergast
Released: April 1, 2015

"Punchy, insightful and great for music lovers. (Fiction. 11-18)"
Stella, a Chinese-Canadian rock drummer, yearns for success for her band. Read full book review >
A CHILDREN'S GUIDE TO ARCTIC BIRDS by Mia Pelletier
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Interesting for bird lovers whose homes are in temperate climes as well, especially those who might see some of these intriguing Arctic nesters in winter. (Nonfiction. 8-15)"
An Arctic ecologist introduces a dozen bird species that take advantage of the food available in the brief but bountiful summer to nest and raise their young in the far north. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >