THE WORLD BENEATH by Janice Warman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"A good complement to nonfiction about apartheid South Africa, a little-explored place and period in children's literature. (glossary, author's note, letter from Amnesty International) (Historical fiction. 11-16)"
Warman turns her journalistic talents to historical fiction in her debut novel about the struggle to end apartheid in South Africa and how it shapes a young boy's life. Read full book review >
SUMMER OF LOST AND FOUND by Rebecca Behrens
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"This blend of history with mystery and fantasy with realism is a good find indeed. (author's note, historical notes) (Fiction. 8-12)"
The mystery of the Lost Colony of Roanoke becomes an engaging backdrop for a preteen experiencing her own losses. Read full book review >

MAYDAY by Karen Harrington
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 24, 2016

"A fine character-driven tale that slowly grows to a crescendo of satisfaction. (Fiction. 10-14)"
After surviving a plane crash, Wayne has plenty to cope with. Read full book review >
THE SEARCH FOR THE HOMESTEAD TREASURE by Ann Treacy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 19, 2016

"A good bet for fans of historical fiction. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Fourteen-year-old Martin must run the family farm after his father is seriously injured in an accident. Read full book review >
THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR by Alan Axelrod
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"Students of American history who are not familiar with the artist's work can find these paintings elsewhere but will appreciate the showcase—more, likely, than they do the sketchy narrative accounts. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A broad overview of the American Revolution's causes and course, paired to select works from a renowned and prolific history painter. Read full book review >

CAMPFIRE COOKIES by Martha Freeman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"This sequel is lacking in 'flour power.' (Fiction. 8-12)"
The four members of Flowerpot Cabin reunite for another summer of friendship, romance, mystery, and cookies (The Secret Cookie Club, 2015).Read full book review >
THE BRIGHTEST STARS OF SUMMER by Leila Howland
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"Readers finding this book as pleasant as a day at the beach spent with old friends will hope the trio returns to Pruet next summer. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The Silver sisters are back on Cape Cod for another satisfying summer adventure in this sequel to The Forget-Me-Not Summer (2015). Read full book review >
SOME KIND OF HAPPINESS by Claire Legrand
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"A layered, thoughtful exploration. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Sometimes stories are a means of survival. Read full book review >
THE SLEEPOVER by Jen Malone
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"Malone's boisterous whirl of capers, pranks, and mystery deftly contains Meghan's journey of self-discovery. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Friends Meghan, Anna Marie, and Paige are eager to have a memorable sleepover. Read full book review >
HILO by Judd Winick
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"Solid. Expect this series to receive the same reverence as Jeff Smith's Bone. (Graphic science fiction. 7-12)"
Hilo, D.J., and Gina have reunited to save the world from more impending robot invasions. Read full book review >
WHAT ELEPHANTS KNOW by Eric Dinerstein
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"This earnest tale will appeal especially to budding naturalists. (glossary) (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
In the borderlands between Nepal and India during the 1970s, an orphan boy overcomes adversity to save his village and become a great elephant driver. Read full book review >
TROLL CONTROL by Elise Allen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 17, 2016

"A mostly lukewarm second outing. (Science fiction. 7-12)"
Only two days after her first assignment for the Association Linking Intergalactics and Earthlings as Neighbors, 12-year-old Gabby Duran's cosmically renowned babysitting skills are called back into service. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >