GO TO JAIL! by Peter Kent
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"It's odd and fascinating material, if a bit antiseptic. (Picture book. 8-12)"
Kent's handsomely drawn book introduces prisons of every crank and radius: prisons without walls (Devil's Island, Siberia); prisons little but walls (the Bastille, the Tower of London); prisons for the most notorious criminals (Alcatraz); prisons for folks who had committed no crime, other than being on the wrong side (prisoner-of-war camps, e.g., Stalag Luft III); and oddball prisons (a hole in the ground, a hollow tree). Read full book review >
DESTINATION: JUPITER by Seymour Simon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"As in the original, the pictures are large and focused; the book is a return trip not to be missed. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-10)"
An updated version of Simon's 1985 book with more spectacular full-color photographs and much more recent information. Read full book review >

AN MEI'S STRANGE AND WONDROUS JOURNEY by Stephan Molnar-Fenton
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"The core of the story is very affecting, but the piece lumbers under the weight of the sentiments and the overripe imagery. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Molnar-Fenton has much to say about how the past can prey on the present, despite the loving attentions of others, in this story about his adopted Chinese daughter's journey from her birthplace to a new home in the US. Read full book review >
THE DAY THE WHALE CAME by Eve Bunting
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"That a child would be sensitive to the whale's plight may prove a timeless notion, but it feels more 1998 than 1920, the date on a nickel viewed close up. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When a train pulls into town carting a dead whale, the citizens of Johnstown, Illinois—one in a Model A—eagerly hand over their buffalo-head nickels and dimes to Captain Pinkney for a chance to view the dead behemoth. Read full book review >
A WEAVE OF WORDS by Robert D. San Souci
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Col¢n's etched watercolors, shadowy and talismanic, ably support this tale of love and sapience and derring-do, which San Souci tells with perfect pacing and alluring imagery. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
From San Souci (Nicholas Pipe, 1997, etc.), a blending of a handful of Armenian folktales into one story that can be filed under plain old good advice, ornately illustrated by Col¢n. Read full book review >

WE PLAYED MARBLES by Tres Seymour
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"The text demands awareness of the war and will elicit questions, so adults who share the book with children may wish to come armed with even more information than is provided in Seymour's helpful note. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A narrative—strikingly similar to Eve Bunting's The Blue and the Gray (1996)—about two boys playing on a former Civil War battlefield; it is suffused with nostalgia and complete with a seed of truth, explained in an author's note. ``We played marbles on our Papaw's farm, on the high dirt mounds of old Fort Craig left over from the Civil War.'' The two boys, perhaps seven and nine, refer to historical events such as a colonel falling from a horse, which Andreasen depicts dreamily in a cloud formation. Read full book review >
LOVE FROM YOUR FRIEND, HANNAH by Mindy Warshaw Skolsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Cheery and winning. (Fiction. 9-12)"
An irrepressible young heroine provides readers with a slice of life along New York State's Hudson River during the Roosevelt era in this epistolary novel. Read full book review >
OUT OF THE OCEAN by Debra Frasier
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"The value of this treasure hunter's appreciation is in the notion that real 'treasure' is in the looking. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Relief for the land-locked comes in the form of this book, which delivers the salt smells and sea sounds that accompany beachcombers right to readers' laps. Read full book review >
THE KIDNAPPERS by Willo Davis Roberts
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Readers will feel Joey's fear and frustration keenly in this expertly done page-turner. (Fiction. 10-12)"
An 11-year-old's reputation for wild stories comes back to haunt him when he's sole witness to a kidnapping but can't get anyone to take him seriously. Read full book review >
BALLPARK by Elisha Cooper
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Sports fans or not, spectators or athletes, children will be engaged for the full nine innings. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A second picture book from Cooper (Country Fair, 1997), cataloging the timeless pleasures of baseball. Read full book review >
ONE THING THAT'S TRUE by Cheryl Foggo
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"A modest but worthy effort. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Adolescence and a shocking revelation temporarily pull two Calgary teenagers from their moorings in this subtle novel. Read full book review >
THE AMERICAN WEI by Marion Hess Pomeranc
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Pomeranc keeps the tone light-hearted and reassuring, showing only the sunny side of coming to America—and missing some of the details found in Maggie Rugg Herold's A Very Important Day (1995). (Picture book. 4-10)"
Wei Fong and his parents have immigrated to America from China, and they're about to become citizens. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >