TAROT SAYS BEWARE by Betsy Byars
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Most readers will find themselves carried along on their own expectations, with little to meet them: Missing are the trademark humor, crackerjack plotting, and fully believable characters that have won Byars (McMummy, 1993, etc.) so many readers in the past. (Fiction. 8-12)"
This Herculeah Jones Mystery begins when the amateur sleuth looks out her window one morning and her hair starts to frizzle, a sure sign that something's wrong. Read full book review >
APOLLO 13 by Michael D. Cole
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

This entry in the Countdown to Space series is a compact account of the Apollo 13 mission. Read full book review >

ABSOLUTELY NORMAL CHAOS by Sharon Creech
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Tightly written, nary a word out of place, by turns sarcastic, tender, and irreverent, this a real piece of comedy about contemporary teen life from one funny writer. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Creech's first children's novel, published in England but never before in the US, will quickly make its way into the hands of readers who loved Walk Two Moons (1994). Read full book review >
MEDIOPOLLITO/HALF-CHICKEN by Alma Flor Ada
adapted by Alma Flor Ada, illustrated by Kim Howard, translated by Rosalma Zubizarreta
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The message is universal and bears repeating: Neighborliness is its own reward, but paybacks come in handy. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A traditional Spanish tale of how the weathervane came to be, set in Mexico and told in Spanish on the left page of each spread, and English on the right. Read full book review >
LIAR by Janine Amos
by Janine Amos, illustrated by Gwen Green
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The catchy titles, however, will surely help get these into the hands of readers who need them; style is not necessarily a prerequisite for effectiveness. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Three stories in which children tell lies and face the consequences, with questions interspersed throughout, and a follow- up discussion. Read full book review >

THE REVEREND THOMAS'S FALSE TEETH by Gayle Gillerlain
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Schutzer's hot, bright colors and swirling line suit the broad humor and energy of the tale; especially striking is a spread of brother Will diving for the teeth among fish and eelgrass, broken crockery and old boots. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
For Gillerlain's first book, a lighthearted, high-spirited retelling of an old Eastern Shore tall tale about a preacher, on his way to dinner, who accidently drops his false teeth in the bay. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"An array of good maps and contemporary black-and- white prints are included. (bibliography, chronology, glossary, index) (Biography. 9-12)"
A useful counter to the wildly romanticized Disney animated movie, this straightforward account of what is known of Pocahontas's life is also very different from Jean Fritz's portrait of a survivor of culture shock, The Double Life of Pocahontas (1991). Read full book review >
THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED IN A VINEGAR BOTTLE by Margaret Read MacDonald
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Excellent for reading aloud or alone. (Picture book/folklore. 7-10)"
This fluent British version of ``The Fisherman and His Wife'' features only two characters: a discontented old woman living in an uncommonly large vinegar bottle, and an obliging fairy who provides her with increasingly palatial housingbut sends her back where she came from when she demands to be Empress of the Universe. Read full book review >
THE HUNDREDTH NAME by Shulamith Oppenheim
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A moving, original tale. (Picture book. 7-9)"
With measured prose Oppenheim (I Love You, Bunny Rabbit, p. 230, etc.) gives this brief story a reverent tone; a strong sense of place established in the text and pictures makes it vivid. Read full book review >
THE DANCING TREE by Ramon Royal Ross
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"For the rare few who will see its moments of grace. (Fiction. 10-13)"
An eccentric piece, more like a sorrowful fairy tale with only a whisper of hope at its core. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Broad horizons, pale skies, and golden flowers combine with perky line drawings; the final pleasing touch is the muffin recipe. (Picture book/folklore. 5-10)"
Ernst (Squirrel Park, 1993, etc.) delivers again in this wacky midwestern take on a familiar tale. Read full book review >
STRONGHEART JACK AND THE BEANSTALK by Pleasant DeSpain
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Gail Haley's Jack and the Bean Tree (1986) is still the best choice for readers in search of an alternative to the many tellings aimed at a younger audience. (Picture book/folklore. 8-10)"
DeSpain (Eleven Turtle Tales, 1994, etc.) turns to the oldest known versions of this durable story for his retelling. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >