THE HUNGRY ONE by Kurt Baumann
by Kurt Baumann, adapted by Naomi Lewis, translated by Naomi Lewis, illustrated by Stasys Eidrigevicius
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Offbeat, but the art and verse are compelling, while the theme may well provoke discussion. (Picture book. 9-14)"
A disturbing allegory illustrated with haunting surreal portraits—photos of torsos with expressive human hands, topped with melancholy mixed-media heads. Read full book review >
DO THEY SCARE YOU? by Sneed B. Collard III
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Razor-Tooth Slime-Encrusted Bone-Muncher,'' complete with slobbering purple-and-green portrait; a book of similarly humorous imaginary monsters might be a more appropriate vehicle for this team. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
In her brief text, Collard develops the theme that ``no animal exists just to scare, hurt, or disgust us''; still, her two dozen selections (bats, tarantulas, vultures, giant squid, piranhas, etc.) all get their kid appeal from their infamous reputations. Read full book review >

MOON FROG by Richard Edwards
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"An attractive addition. (Poetry/Picture book. 4-10)"
Twenty-nine new ``Animal Poems for Young Children''—deftly phrased, contagiously rhythmic, and pleasingly varied. Read full book review >
TWO OF EVERYTHING by Lily Toy Hong
adapted by Lily Toy Hong, illustrated by Lily Toy Hong
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A lively and entertaining offering. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
Hong, who debuted with the much-praised How Ox Star Fell from Heaven (1991), returns to her Chinese heritage for a kindly tale about an aged couple whose fortunes are improved by a magic pot that duplicates whatever is put into it—a blessing, until old Mrs. Haktak falls in and emerges as twins. Read full book review >
I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS by Mavis Jukes
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Expressing with unusual strength the complexity a child's thoughts may have at such a time, a deeply felt book with potential for comforting or for opening communication. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The first half of this depiction of a child's intensity in imagining an upcoming visit to a dying uncle (a former pilot) is a fantasy beginning with ``If she were a skywriter'' and going on to detail the girl's piloting a plane to write a message across a beautiful sunset: ``Good-bye—I love you—I'll see you in my dreams.'' Then, still in a poignant conditional tense, Jukes describes what may really happen (``her mother would say, `He might not even know you're there' ''); though only ``a little kid,'' the child resolves to brave the uncertainties because she would know she was there, and she'd know what to say. Read full book review >

THE CUCKOO CHILD by Dick King-Smith
Released: March 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-11)"
King-Smith's latest is no surprise—yet another tale of an animal on a British farm, informed by keen insight into animal behavior and leavened with just enough fantasy to allow the animals to converse—but it is, predictably, delightful. Read full book review >
GRAY FOX by Jonathan London
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A good balance between tenderness toward life and recognition that it goes on after an individual death. (Picture book. 4-9)"
A quiet, poetic text and luminous art depict a fox's year from fall to summer when, mesmerized by headlights, he's struck by a truck on a country road. Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN OF LIR by Sheila MacGill-Callahan
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A bit pretentious, but undeniably handsome. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
In a tale ``loosely based on an Irish myth,'' Lir's four children are turned into swans by jealous stepmother Aiofe, who grants them just one day a year in their true form—but ``on that day your feet may not touch the earth or you will surely die.'' They find refuge on a whale's back; still, she pursues them relentlessly until the spell is broken by friendly birds who form an arch to join two mountains—the ``Man from the North'' and the ``Woman from the South.'' In the original, these are a man and woman, from warring tribes, who marry; 900 years have elapsed; and the aged children join Lir in heaven—this isn't for purists, but it makes a dramatic story in a folkloric style. Read full book review >
LEAVING ELDORADO by Joann Mazzio
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"A spirited adventure with deftly drawn characters, well-integrated period details, a lively and sharply focused style, and a memorable heroine. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Making a fine bid for the late Patricia Beatty's territory, Mazzio (The One Who Came Back, 1992) depicts a feisty turn-of- the-century girl making her way after her prospector dad leaves her in New Mexico and sets out for the Yukon. Read full book review >
THE FLOWER FAERIE by Frank Asch
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Pretty to look at, with a somewhat nebulous but well-intentioned message about respect for nature: a sugarplum of a book. (Picture book. 6-10)"
An original tale about a fairy captured and displayed as a trophy by an armor-clad emperor, who refuses to release his prize even when all the flowers in the kingdom die and his people are threatened with famine. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Introduction; note; timeline; afterword; glossary; bibliography. (Autobiography. 11-14)"
In 1828, Sherburne published his memoirs as his one legacy to his heirs; here, Zeinert selects the part of greatest interest for a young audience—the author's peregrinations of the Atlantic during the Revolution. Read full book review >
HEY YOU, SISTER ROSE by Eileen Walsh Strauch
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1993

Even before sixth grade begins, Sister Rose has Arlene pegged as needing to be kept in line, while Arlene dreads being in her class. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Beatriz Williams
June 23, 2015

In Beatriz Williams’ latest novel Tiny Little Thing, it’s the summer of 1966 and Christina Hardcastle—“Tiny” to her illustrious family—stands on the brink of a breathtaking future. Of the three Schuyler sisters, she’s the one raised to marry a man destined for leadership, and with her elegance and impeccable style, she presents a perfect camera-ready image in the dawning age of television politics. Together she and her husband, Frank, make the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and impossibly attractive. It seems nothing can stop Frank from rising to national office, and he’s got his sights set on a senate seat in November. But as the season gets underway at the family estate on Cape Cod, three unwelcome visitors appear in Tiny’s perfect life. “A fascinating look at wealth, love, ambition, secrets, and what family members will and won’t do to protect each other,” our reviewer writes. View video >