ZEEE by Elizabeth Enright
Released: April 1, 1993

"An appealing new presentation. (Fiction/Picture book. 6-10)"
First published in 1965, an entrancing story about a "bad fairy" who's really "bad about only one thing": people. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1993

"Glossary; name index; bibliography. (Biography. 8-12)"
A collection of anecdotes about 19 musicians from Vivaldi to Woody Guthrie that's offered ``as a way of getting closer to the musicians—and the music''—but that may only distance readers from traditional music by portraying it as an incomprehensible milieu populated by odd characters. Read full book review >

LOCAL NEWS by Gary Soto
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1993

"Also as usual, the narrative is sprinkled with Spanish words and idioms, defined at the back- -excellent flavoring but, for many, extra work. (Short Stories. 10-13)"
The author of Baseball in April (1990) offers 13 more domestic reversals of fortune. Read full book review >
DO YOU KNOW ME by Nancy Farmer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1993

"Pronouncing glossary. (Fiction. 8-12)"
``Do You Know Me,'' Tapiwa silently projects, glaring at her snobbish classmates as she stalks out of the exclusive school where she's ostracized—though she's at the top of her class- -because her father is a lowly bank teller. Read full book review >
ANIMIAL SOCIETIES by Karen Gravelle
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Brief glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Defining a ``society'' as individuals living together with defined rules and prescribed behaviors, Gravelle discusses several examples, especially wolves, sharks, dolphins, rats, ostriches, ants, and bees. Read full book review >

POWWOW by George Ancona
by George Ancona, photographed by George Ancona
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"A lively, positive portrayal of contemporary Native Americans. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
Capturing the flash and rhythm of Native American dances as performed during a ``pan-Indian'' Crow Fair in Montana, photographer Ancona is at his experienced best. Read full book review >
PROJECT WHEELS by Jacqueline Turner Banks
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not first-rate, but a readable, pleasant additional purchase. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Now that they're in sixth grade, Angela and her small-town Kentucky friends are discovering raging hormones that complicate their relationships, their party plans, and their class Christmas project. Read full book review >
A MOON IN YOUR LUNCH BOX by Michael Spooner
POETRY
Released: April 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Poetry. 6-12)"
Spooner's first book for young people is an appealing seasonal cycle, thematically linked by the moon—symbol of change and mystery and a rich source of other imagery. Read full book review >
IF IT HADN'T BEEN FOR YOON JUN by Marie G. Lee
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1993

"Disappointing. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Though for a younger audience, Lee's second shares concerns about race with her fine debut, Finding My Voice (1992). Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1993

"Still more stories are to come. (Fiction. 10-12)"
It seems only appropriate that death has not brought an end to Bellairs's career; and, happily, this posthumous collaboration has less of a thrown-together feel than his last few books. Read full book review >
MY FIRST MUSIC BOOK by Helen Drew
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Good ideas for teachers, scout leaders, camp counselors, and for home. (Nonfiction. 5-11)"
This large, attractive British import should have been titled My First Book of Musical Instruments: bright color photos and step- by-step instructions show how to make and play a dozen types (heavy on percussion), from simple rattles to a fairly elaborate facsimile of a banjo. Read full book review >
AMZAT AND HIS BROTHERS by Paula Fox
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not to be missed. (Folklore. 8-12)"
A fine novelist passes along three stories told by Floriano Vecchi, born near Bologna (who heard them from his grandfather, b. 1850, who got them from his), explaining that these tales survive—with changes and additions in each generation—though Florian's village was destroyed in WW II. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >