Released: May 1, 1995

"Fans of the series or those undergoing their own suburban teen angst will not be disappointed; others will find Alice unchallenging. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Following Naylor's six earlier books about this heroine (Alice In Between, 1994, etc.), this installment finds Alice and friends Pamela and Elizabeth on the eve of eighth grade, and smoothly chronicles their twelfth summer. Read full book review >
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 1995

"From alligator to zapus, this is an alphabet not to be missed. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-12)"
A sumptuous ABC of predators and their prey, splendid for display or for careful, close viewing. Read full book review >

LOST SUMMER by Elizabeth Feuer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 28, 1995

"Standard fare with a cast of familiar types and a short menu of personal problems, worked out with the help of wise adult advice. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A summer camp story, featuring some minor intrigue, a cabinful of unappealing 12-year-olds, and a predictably happy ending. Read full book review >
SIGNS OF LIFE by Jean Ferris
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 25, 1995

"A bittersweet evocation of the mourning process. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Dreamed memories of an ancient life that may-have-been and a wistful, would-be romance thaw Hannah's grief over the death of her twin sister, Molly. Read full book review >
SPYING ON MISS MULLER by Eve Bunting
Released: April 24, 1995

"The one false note is Jessie's belated and rather facile acceptance of her father's alcoholism (somehow linked to Miss Müller's acceptance of her own father's Nazism), but it's not enough to spoil a good story well told. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Miss Müller — half-Irish, half-German — is a favorite of the girls at Belfast's Alveara School until the start of WW II. Read full book review >

FIG PUDDING by Ralph Fletcher
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 24, 1995

"Sensitive to all the potential problems of the disparity between the substance and the style of his book, Fletcher (I Am Wings, not reviewed) displays an extremely gentle touch. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A book about a big happy family, with lots of laughter, lots of cooking, and lots of eating; it opens with Cliff, the 11-year- old narrator and oldest of six children, ``getting ready to dig into a steaming plate of French toast,'' and closes with his whole family laughing so hard that tears are running down their faces. Read full book review >
A FOR ANTARCTICA by Jonathan Chester
NONFICTION
Released: April 21, 1995

"Recommended only for those in need of pictorial material on this region. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-10)"
A pastiche of full-color photographs, some quite wonderful, that do not make a coherent alphabetical listing. Read full book review >
MICK HARTE WAS HERE by Barbara Park
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 20, 1995

"By the end of the book, readers miss him, too. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's always difficult reading about the death of a child, especially when he's ``one of the neatest kids you'd ever want to meet.'' That's how Phoebe Harte, 13, describes her slightly younger brother Mick, in a poignant story by a writer more associated with making readers laugh (Maxie, Rosie, and Earl—Partners in Grime, 1990, etc.) than cry. Read full book review >
THE CHERRY TREE BUCK by Robin Moore
ANIMALS
Released: April 20, 1995

"A compact and engrossing follow-up to When The Moon Is Full (Knopf, 1994). (Fiction/Short stories. 9-11)"
A professional storyteller shares fond, slightly elongated, memories of his grandfather, and of childhood encounters with six remarkable animals. Read full book review >
AND TWELVE CHINESE ACROBATS by Jane Yolen
Released: April 19, 1995

"A book radiating family warmth, in words, art, and remembrance. (Fiction. 7-10)"
A colorful episode from the history of Yolen's family—her grandparents and their eight children—marinaded in Old World nostalgia. Read full book review >
PINOCCHIO'S SISTER by Jan Slepian
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 19, 1995

"As such it is engrossing and has the feel of emotional truth, with the barest hints of the supernatural adding to the creepiness. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Martha's mother is dead, and her stepmother has left her and her father, a ventriloquist. Read full book review >
NEW WORLD by Gillian Cross
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 15, 1995

"Many questions have been raised by the explosion of cybertechnology and its possible effects on the young; Cross delivers a fast-paced message that techies and Luddites alike will love. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Miriam and Stuart, both 14, are thrilled and honored to be chosen to test the top secret, ultimate new virtual reality game, New World. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >