DRUMBEAR. . .HEARTBEAT by Susan Braine
FICTION
Released: June 16, 1995

"Similar to Robert Crum's Eagle Drum (1994), which has a more lyrical narration, Braine's provides a brief glossary and further reading. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
A nuts-and-bolts look at a revered, fun celebration. ``Check out a powwow sometime,'' the author advises in this installment of the We Are Still Here series, ``There are thousands of these celebrations throughout the country every year. Read full book review >
THE CASE OF THE CONSTANT CALLER by Ralph McInerny
FICTION
Released: June 14, 1995

"Father Dowling books into their hands. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Father Dowling kicks off a mystery series aimed at younger fans of the genre. Read full book review >

THE CASE OF THE ABSENT AUTHOR by E.W. Hildick
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Hildick makes entertaining use of Edgar Allan Poe tales in unraveling this methodically plotted puzzler; suspense and motivation are minimal. (Fiction. 7-10)"
In the 22nd McGurk mystery, the kids are on the trail when a reclusive crime writer disappears after putting them in his latest book. Read full book review >
MY FARM by Jane Conteh-Morgan
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1995

"Small delights. (Board books. 6- 36 mos.)"
One of four board books featuring friendly cut-out shapes that are composed into sunny scenes just right for preschool consumption; the others are My Zoo (ISBN 0-553-09733-4), My Garden (09731-8), and My Family (09730-X). Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"America's sacred promise of freedom from fear and want could be held out to all. (Picture book/nonfiction. 10-14)"
Fifteen memories of Ellis Island—taken from interviews with immigrants who arrived in the early 1900s—add up to the American dream come true. Read full book review >

OUT OF THE WILD by Hope Ryden
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1995

"Overall, this is an interesting and informative title, in which the author speaks persuasively of the combined efforts of human and beast to bring each other out of the wild. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Ryden (Joey, 1994, etc.) describes the probable evolution of 15 of the world's most popular domestic animals including dogs, pigs, sheep, donkeys, elephants, and cats. Read full book review >
ARION AND THE DOLPHIN by Vikram Seth
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 1995

"The scenery, though lush, has little Grecian fragrance. (Picture book/mythology. 6-9)"
This retelling of the ancient Greek tale of Arion the musician and his dolphin friend receives fractured, confusing treatment. Read full book review >
BOYS AT WORK by Gary Soto
ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"After a tense but nonviolent climax, this story comes to its comfortable close, an everyday sort of story punctuated by moments of high and low comedy. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Two Latino fourth-graders scramble to raise money when one accidently breaks a local punk's portable CD player. Read full book review >
TOM, BABETTE, AND SIMON by Avi
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 1995

"With scratchy b&w illustrations. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Shape-shifting adventures in a grand tradition. Read full book review >
DIVING FOR THE MOON by Lee F. Bantle
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Worth adding to collections in communities that are still having trouble accepting the reality of AIDSBantle's message is one of reason and hope. (Fiction. 9-12)"
A first novel puts AIDS squarely in a setting of normal pubescent anxieties unrelated to homosexuality or drug use. Read full book review >
PARTNERS by Karen Waggoner
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1995

"Nonstereotypical characters and plausible problem-solving mark this light tale; Smith's b&w line drawings, as usual, capture each significant moment with deftly depicted facial expressions and body language. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Conflicting motives almost wreck a third grader's firm friendship with his brother in this easy-reading, easygoing family story. Read full book review >
LOOKING AT PHOTOGRAPHS by A.D. Coleman
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1995

"A brief, beautifully informative introduction for all. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A follow-up to the Looking at Paintings book, this large, comely volume contains a full page photograph and one small inset on each spread. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >