CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A competent, useful volume on a vital topic. (b&w photos, diagrams, index, not seen, glossary, further reading) (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
``Green is the color of cultivated fields and the untouched wilderness,'' the Kidds begin, amplifying that observation with an intelligent discussion of the attendant issues that roil in the background. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN BAND OF EDDRIS by Ellen Kindt McKenzie
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The denouement is vague; readers won't knowand may not carewhether Eddris is dead or merely chased off. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Keld and his younger sister Elylden are sent by their mother Anna from their home in the hills to the city of Adnor to seek out a blind potter. Read full book review >

TECUMSEH AND THE SHAWNEE CONFEDERATION by Rebecca Stefoff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

This latest entry in the Library of American Indian History series chronicles the life of the courageous Shawnee leader, Tecumseh, a gifted, charismatic, and ``brilliant, spellbinding orator'' who attempted to unite the Native Americans into an intertribal confederacy and an independent nation against newcomers. Read full book review >
AFRICAN BEGINNINGS by James Haskins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

Beginning with the pre-dynastic Nubian culture, Haskins (see review, above) covers the successive rise and fall of Saharan and sub-Saharan empires and major cities between 3800 b.c. and a.d. 1665, then veers away from the political and economic history for three paragraphs (actually a long caption accompanying an unidentified performer) about ``Music and Dance,'' a similar essay on ``Art and Religion,'' and a lengthier, broad account of ``Slavery and Colonization.'' The bibliography is better than perfunctory, but neither the map, which has no political boundaries, nor the timeline, which refers to people and cultures not covered in the text, are particularly helpful. Read full book review >
SOCCER SCOOP by Matt Christopher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Readers may have trouble keeping the cast of similar-sounding characters straight, and the mystery is solved only after some heavily contrived stratagems. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Christopher (see review, above) was treading water with this routine sports-story- cum-mystery. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Despite the author's wish to honor those who fought bravely, some readers will wonder what makes a person risk all for country, regardless of loved ones back home. (b&w photos, not seen, chapter notes, further reading, index) (Biography. 11-13)"
The most astounding information in this entry in the Collective Biographies series is not that there have been a total of 3,420 medals awarded as the ``nation's highest military honor'' for bravery (11 of whom are covered in this volume), but that only one woman, Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, received one, in 1865. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The coverage is comprehensive, if dry, making this informative book more useful to researchers than browsers. (b&w photos, chronology, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 9-13)"
For those interested in a fuller picture of the fight for educational integration in the US, Haskins (Bayard Rustin, 1997, etc.) attempts to fill in some gaps. Read full book review >
FROM SLAVE SHIP TO FREEDOM ROAD by Julius Lester
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Readers who make that effort will be amply rewarded. (Picture book/nonfiction. 10-12)"
In a stirring picture book for older readers, Lester (Sam and the Tigers, 1996, etc.) creates meditations on the journey of Africans to slavery, on the lives of people held as slaves, and on runaways, the Civil War, and the meaning of freedom. Read full book review >
THE SINGING GEESE by Jan Wahl
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The goose never looks cooked, or dead for that matter, with its head and neck rising above the pot of tomatoes and carrots; that suits this slightly surreal tale just fine. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Wahl (I Met a Dinosaur, p. 1396, etc.) retells a weird but funny story told, he says, by an old black man on a porch in West Virginia. Read full book review >
GUS GRISSOM by Carmen Bredeson
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

The ill-fated life of astronaut Virgil ``Gus'' Grissom is recounted in this latest entry to the Countdown to Space series aimed at less proficient readers. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

In an entry in the Constitution series, this tedious, though up-to-date, discussion covers the history of the First Amendment, the rights it guarantees, and how it works (or is supposed to work): to limit government more than it does the individual. Read full book review >
THE WORLD OF THE PIRATE by Val Garwood
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Berridge employs maps, detailed close-ups, and a fascinating cutaway of a pirate ship to reinforce the text; for children fascinated by the subject, this book is as good as buried treasure. (maps, index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
This thorough, lavishly illustrated entry in The World Of series focuses on pirates through the ages, providing the facts behind the legends. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >