BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Also included: a cut-and-dried introduction on how Congress works; a forthright report on how the book was researched; selected bibliography; index. (Biography. 9-14)"
Any girl seeking a role model for a political career will find at least one here. Read full book review >
THE RABBIT'S JUDGMENT by Suzanne Crowder Han
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1994

"An unusual and attractive edition of a wise and worthy story. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
Citing this sage tale's previous appearance in her own Korean Folk and Fairy Tales, Han discusses the various sources she consulted for her retelling. Read full book review >

BEGINNINGS by Virginia Kroll
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1994

"Kroll's upbeat, realistic text and Schuett's vibrant acrylic and pastel art combine for a joyous take on the diversity of the contemporary family. (Picture book. 4-9)"
In warmly glowing illustrations and dialogue that exudes familial affection, sketches of six differently composed families. Read full book review >
TROUBLE WILL FIND YOU by Joan M. Lexau
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Accompanied by amiably realistic b&w illustrations, a cheerful, quick read for the easy chapter-book shelf. (Fiction. 9-11)"
A breezy little story about a boy who wants a dog, but whose parents don't believe he's responsible enough to have one. Read full book review >
NANNIES FOR HIRE by Amy Hest
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1994

Jenny Marks, one of the trio of eight-year-olds introduced in Pajama Party (1992), gets a baby sister. Read full book review >

PIANNA by Mary Lyn Ray
by Mary Lyn Ray, illustrated by Bobbie Henba
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1994

"There's no plot here, but the upbeat depiction of the central role of music in one long, busy life is a pleasure; both Ray and Henba have chosen authentic specifics that are sure to engage young readers. (Picture book. 4-9)"
A New Hampshire painter, ``inspired by memories of her own childhood in the early 1900s,'' brings to her first book a sunny, attractively detailed style that—in design, subject matter, and the rendering of its period settings—pays obvious tribute to Barbara Cooney. Read full book review >
WHEN THE WATER CLOSES OVER MY HEAD by Donna Jo Napoli
Released: March 1, 1994

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
By a gifted author (whose first three children's books range from Soccer Shock, 1991, to a hilarious frog-prince takeoff— Prince of the Pond, 1992—to the splendidly dark, intricately structured The Magic Circle, 1993), a genial family story that, in its forthright good humor and succinct handling of real issues, recalls Betsy Byars. Read full book review >
THE STONE LION by Alan Schroeder
adapted by Alan Schroeder, illustrated by Todd L.W. Doney
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1994

"All in all, a bit more accessible but with less narrative energy than Smedley's version, while the lavish art is sure to appeal. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
An unsourced retelling of a Tibetan tale with the familiar theme of a good-hearted and a greedy brother who each receives his just deserts. Read full book review >
THUMBS UP, RICO! by Maria Testa
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1994

"An upbeat story that will find many uses, as a hi-lo, a young reader, or a readaloud. (Fiction. 5-11)"
Rico, who has Down syndrome, creates a likable self-portrait in three brief chapters. ``The First Time I Met Caesar,'' he explains, the other boy called him ``Dummy'' and ridiculed his playing basketball, but after several encounters Rico's persistent cheerfulness—and real ability with the ball—enables the two to make friends. Read full book review >
NEVER TAKE A PIG TO LUNCH by Nadine Bernard  Westcott
POETRY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Index. (Poetry. 6-11)"
There isn't a child on earth who won't sample, snack, and nibble with delight at this delicious smorgasbord of more than 60 poems. Read full book review >
COWBOY by Linda Granfield
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
An affectionate tribute to cowboys, in myth and reality, including descriptions of their dress, lingo (``cowboyspeak''), work, and play as well as sketchy accounts of famous lawmen, outlaws, authors, artists, and movie stars, all illustrated with sheaves of contemporary photos, advertisements, and other illustrations. Read full book review >
THE BIRD, THE FROG, AND THE LIGHT by Avi
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Spare and well-told, a tale that will especially lend itself to discussion. (Picture book. 5-9)"
An intriguing original fable concerning a self-styled "Frog King" who invites a bird he's overheard singing to the sun into his underground "kingdom." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >