CLOSE TO HOME by Lydia Weaver
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Fifth-grader Betsy, whose mother works in Jonas Salk's research lab, has an on-again, off-again friendship with fascinating, mischievous Leticia, whose mother is so fearful of polio that she believes every wild speculation about how it might be spread—even that it may be carried by Communists. Read full book review >
CHIN YU MIN AND THE GINGER CAT by Jennifer Armstrong
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"GrandPrÇ debuts with illustrations that glow with warmth, grace, and humor; her distinctive style features striking exaggerations of perspective and expression, plus an intense palette centered on red-purple and tawny orange. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Reduced to penury, the conceited widow of a Chinese official adopts an elegant cat that can catch fish with his tail. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Another outstanding science book from a prolific author, this focusing on efforts to save the largest North American bird from extinction, and greatly enhanced by stunning color photos by the designer of the California condor release program, who's also bird curator at the L.A. Zoo. Read full book review >
THE WALLS OF PEDRO GARCIA by Kevin McColley
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Still, a thoughtful story, crafted with ingenuity—a promising first. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Pedro, 12, prides himself on being a man who's worked on Se§or de Lupe's estate beside his grandfather, Miguel, for six years. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY ONE by Kurt Baumann
by Kurt Baumann, adapted by Naomi Lewis, translated by Naomi Lewis, illustrated by Stasys Eidrigevicius
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Offbeat, but the art and verse are compelling, while the theme may well provoke discussion. (Picture book. 9-14)"
A disturbing allegory illustrated with haunting surreal portraits—photos of torsos with expressive human hands, topped with melancholy mixed-media heads. Read full book review >

DO THEY SCARE YOU? by Sneed B. Collard III
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Razor-Tooth Slime-Encrusted Bone-Muncher,'' complete with slobbering purple-and-green portrait; a book of similarly humorous imaginary monsters might be a more appropriate vehicle for this team. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
In her brief text, Collard develops the theme that ``no animal exists just to scare, hurt, or disgust us''; still, her two dozen selections (bats, tarantulas, vultures, giant squid, piranhas, etc.) all get their kid appeal from their infamous reputations. Read full book review >
MOON FROG by Richard Edwards
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"An attractive addition. (Poetry/Picture book. 4-10)"
Twenty-nine new ``Animal Poems for Young Children''—deftly phrased, contagiously rhythmic, and pleasingly varied. Read full book review >
TWO OF EVERYTHING by Lily Toy Hong
adapted by Lily Toy Hong, illustrated by Lily Toy Hong
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A lively and entertaining offering. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
Hong, who debuted with the much-praised How Ox Star Fell from Heaven (1991), returns to her Chinese heritage for a kindly tale about an aged couple whose fortunes are improved by a magic pot that duplicates whatever is put into it—a blessing, until old Mrs. Haktak falls in and emerges as twins. Read full book review >
I'LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS by Mavis Jukes
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Expressing with unusual strength the complexity a child's thoughts may have at such a time, a deeply felt book with potential for comforting or for opening communication. (Picture book. 5-10)"
The first half of this depiction of a child's intensity in imagining an upcoming visit to a dying uncle (a former pilot) is a fantasy beginning with ``If she were a skywriter'' and going on to detail the girl's piloting a plane to write a message across a beautiful sunset: ``Good-bye—I love you—I'll see you in my dreams.'' Then, still in a poignant conditional tense, Jukes describes what may really happen (``her mother would say, `He might not even know you're there' ''); though only ``a little kid,'' the child resolves to brave the uncertainties because she would know she was there, and she'd know what to say. Read full book review >
THE CUCKOO CHILD by Dick King-Smith
Released: March 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 7-11)"
King-Smith's latest is no surprise—yet another tale of an animal on a British farm, informed by keen insight into animal behavior and leavened with just enough fantasy to allow the animals to converse—but it is, predictably, delightful. Read full book review >
GRAY FOX by Jonathan London
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A good balance between tenderness toward life and recognition that it goes on after an individual death. (Picture book. 4-9)"
A quiet, poetic text and luminous art depict a fox's year from fall to summer when, mesmerized by headlights, he's struck by a truck on a country road. Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN OF LIR by Sheila MacGill-Callahan
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 1993

"A bit pretentious, but undeniably handsome. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
In a tale ``loosely based on an Irish myth,'' Lir's four children are turned into swans by jealous stepmother Aiofe, who grants them just one day a year in their true form—but ``on that day your feet may not touch the earth or you will surely die.'' They find refuge on a whale's back; still, she pursues them relentlessly until the spell is broken by friendly birds who form an arch to join two mountains—the ``Man from the North'' and the ``Woman from the South.'' In the original, these are a man and woman, from warring tribes, who marry; 900 years have elapsed; and the aged children join Lir in heaven—this isn't for purists, but it makes a dramatic story in a folkloric style. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sara Paretsky
author of BRUSH BACK
July 28, 2015

No one would accuse V. I. Warshawski of backing down from a fight, but there are a few she’d be happy to avoid. High on that list is tangling with Chicago political bosses. Yet that’s precisely what she ends up doing when she responds to Frank Guzzo’s plea for help in Brush Back, the latest thriller from bestselling author Sara Paretsky. For six stormy weeks back in high school, V.I. thought she was in love with Frank. He broke up with her, she went off to college, he started driving trucks for Bagby Haulage. She forgot about him until the day his mother was convicted of bludgeoning his kid sister, Annie, to death. Stella Guzzo was an angry, uncooperative prisoner and did a full 25 years for her daughter’s murder. Newly released from prison, Stella is looking for exoneration, so Frank asks V.I. for help. “Paretsky, who plots more conscientiously than anyone else in the field, digs deep, then deeper, into past and present until all is revealed,” our reviewer writes. View video >