THE SUNFLOWER FAMILY by Cherie Winner
NATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 1996

"While the information is somewhat technical for beginners, this is a beautiful book for budding gardeners and nature enthusiasts who already have some background on the subject. (full-color photos, diagrams, illustrations, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
In the Nature Watch series, an informative book that introduces readers to plants of the composite family, whose most familiar members are sunflowers. Read full book review >
KAYUKTUK by Brian Heinz
by Brian Heinz, illustrated by Jon Van Zyle
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"However, the lengthy text is dramatic; the paintings are a realistic accompaniment. (afterword, glossary) (Picture book. 5-9)"
Heinz (The Wolves, p. 1235) and Van Zyle team up for an involving glimpse of the lives of traditional I§upiat people. Read full book review >

THE WAGON by Tony Johnston
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Ransome's paintings give life to the characters and bring out the luster of the surroundings; the story is ardent and somber, a piercing lament. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Johnston (The Ghost of Nicholas Greebe, p. 824, etc.) portrays the evils of slavery through the sufferings of a boy born a slave because his skin is the color of ``smooth, dark wood.'' The boy grows up under ``the whish of the lash''—he cried at the near- fatal beating of an old man and was himself whipped, and then ``striped good'' for a desperate act of vandalism. Read full book review >
BROWN SUNSHINE OF SAWDUST VALLEY by Marguerite Henry
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Shields's black-and-white drawings bring warmth to the story. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Molly wants a horse of her own, but money is tight in the Moore household, making it unlikely that she'll ever realize her dream. Read full book review >
MAPLES IN THE MIST by Minfong Ho
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"About the Poets'' section offers brief biographies. (Picture book/poetry. 6-9)"
A collection of tiny poems set against watercolors painted in the Chinese tradition. Read full book review >

A DIFFERENT KIND OF COURAGE by Ellen Howard
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Zina regains her voice and Bertrand loses his fear, but they never clearly realize just why they've been sent away, and readers expecting them to reach safety will find the conclusion precipitate. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A dry, disappointing story of two children fleeing Nazi-occupied France. Read full book review >
OUT OF THE DARK by Welwyn Wilton Katz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"With the macho Viking tales and the emphasis on brotherhood, there may be a temptation to label this a book for boys, but few readers will not gain from this clear-eyed and encouraging tale of a family's love and survival. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Katz (Come Like Shadows, 1993, etc.) mixes Viking mythology with the unlikely setting of a small coastal village in Newfoundland in this heartwarming tale about a family's struggle through grief. Read full book review >
THE VIEW FROM SATURDAY by E.L. Konigsburg
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The large cast, looping plot line, and embedded stories with different narrators require careful sorting, but the effort is eminently worthwhile, and Konigsburg kindly provides answers at the end. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Admirable acts, challenging ideas, and grace notes positively festoon this superb tale of four sixth graders and a paraplegic teacher forming a junior high Academic Bowl team that sweeps away the competition. Read full book review >
BREAKING INTO PRINT by Stephen Krensky
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"It's a gorgeous format that does complete justice to the subject. (chronology) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
From an author who has written about this topic before, though fictionally (The Printer's Apprentice, 1995), a brief history of book-making (subtitled ``Before and After the Invention of the Printing Press''), from illuminated manuscripts created by monks and Chinese attempts at movable type, through Gutenberg's press and the subsequent explosion of the printed word. Read full book review >
HURRICANES by Patricia Lauber
NATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The book is thoroughly up-to-date, and, like its subject, quite powerful. (full-color photos, maps, diagrams, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
A glossy book about monster storms, past and yet to be. Read full book review >
WALLPAPER FROM SPACE by Daniel Pinkwater
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

Steve sulks when his mom redecorates the house, but cheers up when he gets to pick out wallpaper with spaceships for his room. Read full book review >
SHILOH SEASON by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Still, readers will find Marty's anxiety, and his love for Shiloh, engrossingly genuine. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Seeing Judd Travers illegally shoot a deer gave Marty Preston the leverage he needed to win ownership of an abused dog in Naylor's Shiloh (1991); now Judd has taken to drink and become even more trigger-happy than before, and Marty frets that the man will declare open season on Shiloh out of spite. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >