FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An uneven collection, with some eerie high points. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Eleven ``horror'' tales that are not as uncommon as the title would have it. Read full book review >
SPOTTING THE LEOPARD by Anna Myers
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Myers has created another bittersweet tale that celebrates average people and the courage they muster to follow their hearts. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's back to the bucolic Oklahoma landscape Myers (Fire in the Hills, p. 161, etc.) evokes in her newest novel, a sequel to Red- Dirt Jessie (1992), set in the era between the Depression and the outbreak of WW II. H.J., now a teenager, narrates; Jessie is finishing up high school in town; Mama holds down the homefront while Pa, lucky enough to be hired by the WPA, spends weeks away from the family he loves, earning enough for the luxuries of an extra homemade pie and marbles for Christmas. Read full book review >

FOUND by June Oldham
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"While the ending is cautiously optimistic, an undercurrent and violence warns of the consequences, should self-interest prevail over concern for the common good. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A riveting novel. Read full book review >
GOD BLESS THE GARGOYLES by Dav Pilkey
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Still, readers will find solace in this modern-day answer to existentialism. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Pilkey (The Paperboy, p. 141, etc.) joins the medieval fray with a bucolic approach to the journey of gargoyles from the cathedrals of the Middle Ages to modern cityscapes. Read full book review >
ELEANOR by Barbara Cooney
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An author's note supplies other relevant information. (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
"From the beginning the baby was a disappointment to her mother," Cooney (The Story of Christmas, 1995, etc.) begins in this biography of Eleanor Roosevelt. Read full book review >

WHILE THE CANDLES BURN by Barbara Diamond Goldin
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"A worthwhile collection. (Short stories. 6-11)"
In eight stories, Goldin (The Passover Journey, 1994, etc.) seeks to go beyond the specific historical basis for Hanukkah to the themes that the holiday celebrates: ``religious freedom and commitment, faith, courage, charity, rededication, honoring women at Hanukkah, lights, and miracles.'' Several of the stories focus on maintaining faith in the face of persecution. Read full book review >
SHRINKING PAINS by E.M. Goldman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Goldman (Getting Lincoln's Goat, 1995, etc.) offers a fast read, but not a very interesting one. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Best friends Doug and Milo, both 12, along with Doug's worldly cousin Cassandra, 14, discover a fountain of youth; the water halves the age of whomever drinks it, but only for three hours. Read full book review >
THE WINTER HARE by Joan Elizabeth Goodman
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"There is no glossary for the obscure terms, but there are handsome black-and-white chapter decorations and a map to complete this expressive work. (Fiction. 10-14)"
This first novel by Goodman (Bernard's Bath, 1996, etc.), set in 1140, chronicles the desire of Will, 12, to emulate King Arthur and to become a great knight during a time of civil war in England. Read full book review >
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Truly original creative turns show promise, but can't compensate for a wild-card plot. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When Billie and her baby brother, Bix, neglected children of rock stars, stow away in their uncle's car, they find themselves transported to the Borderland, a world where animals talk. Read full book review >
JACOB LAWRENCE by Nancy Shroyer Howard
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Unlike The Great Migration (1993), which reads like a quiet walk through a gallery accompanied by the artist, Howard's book is more like a scavenger hunt through the art itself. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Most of Lawrence's works that are covered in this book- -subtitled ``American Scenes, American Struggles''—such as The Great Migration, or the lives of Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Toussaint L'Ouverture, involve a series of paintings that chronicle African-American history or create a biographical portrait. Read full book review >
THE QUITE REMARKABLE ADVENTURES OF THE OWL AND THE PUSSYCAT by Eric Idle
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Illustrated with a mix of Lear's sketches and new pen-and-ink drawings in the same spirit, this delivers the kind of funny business for which Idle is known, and will probably appease adult Python fans who wish to pass on a gentler form of the lunacy to their children. (Fiction. 10-12)"
When a Monty Python alum offers a novelization of an Edward Lear poem, it's practically guaranteed to be a Silly Walk. Read full book review >
SARAH WITH AN H by Hadley Irwin
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Although the scenes leading up to a climactic basketball game are glossed over, the action lends excitement to the novel and includes a turn of events—Sarah sustains injury but doggedly keeps playing—reminiscent of the drama in the recent Olympics. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Marti, who has lived in the small town of LaMond, Iowa, all her life, is hesitant when a teacher directs her to show a new girl around. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >