BROTHERS LIKE FRIENDS by Klaus Kordon
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 3, 1992

"Still, a moving story and a particularly authentic account of the period. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Set in 1950, an autobiographical novel first published in 1978, by an award-winning Berlin author making his US debut. Read full book review >
NATURE
Released: June 3, 1992

"Index and photos not seen. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
A pedestrian look at where garbage comes from and where it goes, without the depth or balance of Lee's The Throwaway Society (1990) or the pizzazz of Gibbons's easier, visually appealing Recycle! (p. 393). Read full book review >

GHOSTLY TALES OF LOVE AND REVENGE by Daniel Cohen
HEALTH
Released: June 3, 1992

"Perhaps not at night. (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
Cohen's Ghosts of War (1990) were men; here, women's ghosts comprise most of the cast—women who died betrayed or abandoned, by murder or accident; who returned for love, vengeance, or (in one case) jewelry. Read full book review >
ANTICS! by Cathi Hepworth
ABC BOOKS
Released: June 3, 1992

"A delightful vocabulary expander. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Not truly an anthology—though the pun is forgivable—but an alphabet of words with the syllable ``ant'' (``Brilliant,'' ``Immigrants,'' ``Rembrandt,'' ``Xanthophile''), accompanied by imaginatively conceived ant characters: a slim, armored ``Gallant'' bowing to his monarch; ``Kant'' with pen and quizzically furrowed brow; a giant ``Mutant'' menacing an anteater; an ``Observant'' sleuth. Read full book review >
POPCORN PARK ZOO by Wendy Pfeffer
ANIMALS
Released: June 3, 1992

"Brief glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 8- 12)"
This unusual zoo in New Jersey takes in and cares for old, injured, handicapped, or unwanted animals, both wild and domestic. Read full book review >

THE SIMPLE PEOPLE by Tedd Arnold
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Simplistic and heavy-handed, but in the spirit of real contemporary concerns—a book that could contribute to thoughtful discussion. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The ``simple people''—depicted in Shachat's glowing mixed- media art as adult males whose pink, almost hairless heads constitute more than half their bulk—live happily, singing songs and eating fruit, until a serpent intrudes in the form of a first invention: Node makes a frame to look through. Read full book review >
SUSANNAH AND THE PURPLE MONGOOSE MYSTERY by Patricia Elmore
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"The jacket painting shows Susannah as African-American; other illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Third in a series of mysteries solved by a multiethnic trio of sixth-grade detectives in Oakland, California. Read full book review >
TALKING WALLS by Margy Burns Knight
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Thoughtfully composed, an unusually attractive book that wisely allows readers to draw their own inferences. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-10)"
What is a wall? Read full book review >
LOOKING AT THE MOON by Kit Pearson
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"A period piece, at its best in evoking those strangely peaceful days. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The second in a trilogy (The Sky Is Falling, 1990)—about two English children sent to live in Canada during WW II—takes Norah (now 13) and little brother Gavin for a summer at the large lakeside establishment of the Drummond family, whose several generations come there also to join Norah's hostess, wealthy old Mrs. Ogilvie. Read full book review >
SALLY ANN ON HER OWN by Terrance Dicks
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Marred by see-through paper. (Fiction. 5-9)"
When her family outgrows their well-loved rag doll, they donate Sally Ann to nice Mrs. Foster's day care center, where she overhears a conversation intimating that the center may have to close. Read full book review >
COUSIN MARKIE AND OTHER DISASTERS by Christel Kleitsch
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 1992

"Some of the cartoon-like b&w drawings show Ben's fantasy adventures, Ö la Calvin and Hobbes. (Fiction. 7-9)"
A humorous story about a boy realizing for the first time what it's like to be in the other guy's shoes: Ben tries hard to be nice when his nerdy cousin Markie visits for a weekend, but when Markie makes him miss out on the leaf-raking job that would finally have given him enough money to buy a skateboard, Ben takes out his frustration and disappointment on the younger boy. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Index. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
An American woman who lives in Kenya and has played a major role in preserving the endangered Rothschild giraffe (as she described in Daisy Rothschild, 1987) surveys similar efforts on behalf of several species in East Africa, by herself and others, including George Adamson (of lion fame) and Anna Mertz, ``the rhino lady.'' The author's style is conversational, even naive; but her delightful anecdotes about particular animals—zebras, warthogs, cheetahs, and others—offer real, unsentimental insights into the importance of the work described and the problems faced along the way. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >