KINAALDA by Monty Roessel
FICTION
Released: Dec. 15, 1993

"Bibliography. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
By ``a Navajo photographer and writer who specializes in contemporary Native Americans,'' a clear, strikingly photographed account of 13-year-old Celinda McKelvey's coming-of-age ceremony, set in its historical context (such traditions, nearly lost in the 1950s and -60s, are coming back along with renewed Navajo pride). Read full book review >
RANSOM FOR A RIVER DOLPHIN by Sarita Kendall
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 15, 1993

"Despite such shortcomings, an unusual book, and certainly a heartfelt one. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Carmenza, who lives in an Amazon Basin village in Colombia, contributes to her family's income by delivering shortwave radio messages to neighbors. Read full book review >

A GATHERING OF GARTER SNAKES by Bianca Lavies
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Lucid text and the compelling photos make this title a must for snake lovers. (Nonfiction 8-12)"
Imagine ten thousand garter snakes writhing and wriggling as they emerge from winter hibernation in the limestone caverns in Manitoba, Canada. Read full book review >
SLEEPING BEAUTY by Margaret Early
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Still, where affordable, a handsome evocation of the tale's courtly origins. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-9)"
An illustrator whose Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1989) was an ALA Notable renders one of Perrault's tales (without the concluding episodes about the ogre mother-in-law) in a similarly sumptuous style. Read full book review >
WHEN WINTER COMES by Robert Maass
TIME & SEASONS
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"It will be interesting to see what he makes of spring. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-9)"
In his third photographic evocation of a season as enjoyed by children in different settings, Maass strikes a quieter tone than he did in When Summer Comes (p. 787), emphasizing winter's somber blues and grays; here, snow scenes are muted under clouded skies, and the occasional bright hat, or a cozy interior with Chanukah candles or a soft red Navaho rug beneath an unlit Christmas tree, counterpoint the duller tones rather subtly. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Source notes; appendices; bibliography; b&w photo insert and index not seen. (Biography. 11-13)"
Brimming with hero worship, the Doherty's account of ``the most well-known celebrity in the world,'' ``living proof that the American Dream [is] still alive...'' has an Algeresque flavor. Read full book review >
NO EFFECT by Daniel Hayes
FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"But Tyler's a likable guy, and kids his age will enjoy spending time with him. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In his third novel about Tyler (who lives in upstate New York with his widowed actress mom, a housekeeper, and big-brother surrogate Chuckie, ex-Marine and present ``groundskeeper''), Hayes turns from the melodrama of The Trouble with Lemons (1991) and the farce of The Eye of the Beholder (1992) to a better balanced, more realistic story about the eighth grader in love- -with his new science teacher, Miss Williams. Read full book review >
THE PAGEMASTER by David Kirschner
FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Entice readers with Anne Lindbergh's imaginative Travel Far, Pay No Fare (1992). (Fiction. 10-12)"
A phobic 10-year-old is trapped in a library of animated literary classics in this earnest, handsomely set out, but uninspired tale from Hanna-Barbera's CEO (creator of ``An American Tail'') and a staff writer. Read full book review >
AMPHIBIANS by Edward R. Ricciuti
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
In the 14-volume Our Living World series, a colorful look at common amphibians worldwide—frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, and the legless, wormlike caecilians. Read full book review >
MISS BUTTERPAT GOES WILD! by Malcolm Yorke
ADVENTURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

Curled up in the teachers' room with her knitting and tea, Miss Cushy Butterpat is the epitome of dull; when she tells her class that, during vacation, she ``might stow away on a ship to South America, explore the jungle, live with a tribe of Indians, canoe down the river...'', they say, ``You do tell whoppers.'' But that's what she does, though her adventures, which comprise most of the book, are even more exciting, especially in Chamberlain's lively, cartoony illustrations. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF THE GREAT LAKE by Percy Trezise
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 19, 1993

"Try pairing this venerable tale with Greene's equally ancient The Legend of the Cranberry (p. 1143). (Folklore/Picture book. 4-10)"
An Australian author who has retold several Aboriginal tales, often in collaboration with Aboriginal author-artist Dick Roughsey, recounts a tale, remembered in Aboriginal oral history, of the huge lake located—before the Ice Age—between what is now Australia and Papua New Guinea. Read full book review >
THE CHRISTMAS DONKEY by Gillian McClure
FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 1993

"Lovely. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The gifted illustrator of several of her father Paul Coltman's books (Witch Watch, 1989) relates a simple tale of her own, one with unusual resonance. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >