NATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Useful, relevant fare. (reproductions, charts, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Students expecting an dry academic treatise on water, its scarcity, and drought will be pleasantly surprised by this lively, informed presentation. Read full book review >
SINGING AMERICA by Neil Philip
POETRY
Released: June 1, 1995

"In art and word, the America that emerges is compelling in all its contradictions. (further reading, indices of first lines, titles, subject, and poets) (Poetry. 10-14)"
An astounding array of poems about the American identity, representing the events and attitudes that have helped shape a unique history, by the compiler of Fairy Tales from Eastern Europe (1991). Read full book review >

ANTARCTIC ENCOUNTER by Sally Poncet
NATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"A map and photographic glossary of the fauna of South Georgia are helpful additions. (index) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7- 10)"
A uniquely personal introduction to the Antarctic and to a way of life that will leave readers wanting more. Read full book review >
ODD MAN OUT by Gail Radley
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 1995

"The value of friendship over popularity is an evergreen theme, but a book like Nancy H. Wilson's The Reason For Janey (1994) offers a more intimate, convincing picture of the mentally challenged. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An uneven story from the author of Golden Days (1991), about fraternal twins who decide to help a retarded man. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1995

"Granfield's Cowboy: An Album (1994) or Murdoch's Cowboy (1993), among many others, leaves this one in the dust. (b&w illustrations, notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
The reality behind the image of the American cowboy gets a quick once-over in this perfunctory, thinly illustrated report. Read full book review >

CYBERSTORM by Gloria Skurzynski
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Readers who already cruise cyberspace may find that Darcy's unscientific leap into the virtual dimension is simply too far to go. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Skurzynski (Almost The Real Thing, 1991) creates a breathless chase through virtual reality that seems more like an adolescent soap opera than hardcore science fiction. Read full book review >
LIZZIE LOGAN WEARS PURPLE SUNGLASSES by Eileen Spinelli
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 1995

"With its easy-to-read format and entertaining story, this looks like a hit. (Fiction. 7-10)"
It's not always easy to be best friends, especially when the friend is two years older and has an eccentric imaginationthat's the premise of this very funny book. Read full book review >
THE PRINTER'S APPRENTICE by Stephen Krensky
FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"But Krensky (The Iron Dragon Never Sleeps, 1994, etc.) makes good use of historical fact, his plot moves along smoothly, and the ideas and ideals are worth reading about; for many readers, this first meeting with Peter Zenger may not be their last. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Two young apprentices in colonial New York get involved in the most controversial event of their daythe arrest and trial of printer Peter Zenger. Read full book review >
MYRNA NEVER SLEEPS by Beth Peterson
ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 1995

"Each episode repeats the same formula, and without offering a sense of Myrna as herself, the fantasy wears a bit thin. (Fiction. 6-9)"
The reason Myrna never sleeps is that she's busy dreaming up amazing adventures. Read full book review >
MODERN ART by Pauline Ridley
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 1, 1995

"Their strengths are putting artists and art movements in a larger context rather than investigating individuals; they are especially advantageous when used in conjunction with other texts. (full-color reproductions, glossary, bibliography, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
From the Art and Artists series. Read full book review >
THE VAN GOGH CAFE by Cynthia Rylant
FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1995

"Rylant (Mr. Putter and Tabby Bake the Cake, 1994, etc.) has no need for a car crash or someone jumping off a bridge to entertain; this one does it with the light-filled strokes of ordinary events. (Fiction. 8- 12)"
Scenes from a cafe in Flowers, Kansas, where ``magic'' mingles with everyday life. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 1995

"By ignoring the moral issues involved in the pursuit of scientific discoveries, Sherrow shortchanges readers; a more balanced account of this partnership can be found in Joyce Baldwin's DNA Pioneer: James Watson and the Double Helix (1994), geared to the same age group. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A flawed entry in the Partners series of biographies, this book explores the unique relationship between Watson and Crick, who (along with Maurice Wilkins) were awarded a Nobel prize for solving the mystery of the structure of DNA. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >