DANNY AIN'T by Joe Cottonwood
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Cottonwood makes his points in both obvious and subtle ways and buoys his story with an idiosyncratic, good-natured cast; with Danny's voracious, vividly described hunger (almost a running gag); and with a soccer game in which the winner is not the team with the highest score. (Fiction. 11-13)"
When Danny's Pop goes back to the VA hospital with recurrent post-traumatic stress disorder, Danny discovers he's not quite as capable of caring for himself as he'd thought. Read full book review >
KATHY'S HATS by Trudy Krisher
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"An author's note sets the book in this context and explains that it is based on her own daughter's experience; Westcott's perceptive, freely drawn illustrations are painted in cheerfully attractive colors. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Kathy describes the hats she's worn since she was a baby- -winter cap, sunbonnet, Easter finery—until the year she gets cancer and chemotherapy leaves her with a new need for hats that makes her dislike them for the first time. Read full book review >

THE MAGNIFICENT NOSE by Anna Fienberg
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"The greatest treasures may be the observations of the adults who, either oblivious or enamored of their children's skills, buoy the tales with almost every comment. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Small, peculiar children with enormous gifts parade through this storybook of almost self-contained chapters, set down amidst alternating pages of whimsical full-color and b&w illustrations. Read full book review >
KNITWITS by William Taylor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"With unpredictably comical depictions that never lapse into caricature, and descriptions of the sweater's progress that are a study in gleeful boyish pride, this blithe look at an expectant family has no dropped stitches. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Taylor's comedies Agnes the Sheep (1991) and this latest have in common not only references to wool culture, but a zany point-of- view and some fairly unravelled scenes of domestic life in New Zealand. Read full book review >
MOP, MOONDANCE, AND THE NAGASAKI KNIGHTS by Walter Dean Myers
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"And the intended audience will enjoy the play-by- play games and their genuinely childlike errors and successes—as well as the ongoing joke of T.J.'s overrating his own prowess. (Fiction. 8-12)"
The appealing young baseball players introduced in 1988's Me, Mop, and the Moondance Kid (about an interracial New Jersey group, including recently adopted narrator T.J., his brother Moondance, and a girl from the same orphanage who's adopted by their coach) are featured here in a tournament with teams from Mexico, Japan, and France plus their usual local rivals. Read full book review >

THE BRIDGES OF SUMMER by Brenda Seabrooke
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Best of all, past and present mores are contrasted in an absorbing story where both are presented with acumen and sympathy. (Fiction. 10-15)"
A sophisticated young New Yorker returns unwillingly to her roots when her mother sends her for a summer with her grandmother Quanimina, who lives the traditional life of the Gullah off the Carolina coast. Read full book review >
FRONT PORCH STORIES AT THE ONE-ROOM SCHOOL by Eleanora E. Tate
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Some of the lively characters in Just an Overnight Guest (1980) return in this celebration of storytelling and small-town life. Read full book review >
'WHO WAS THAT MASKED MAN, ANYWAY?' by Avi
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Avi's 1992 Newbery honor book): an entertaining farce; an outspoken satire on the mesmerizing effects of the media; and a thought-provoking contrast between the heroic fantasies of a boy deprived of his busy parents' attention and the horrors of real war. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Gorged on an excess of radio drama, "Chet Barker, Master Spy" (a.k.a. sixth-grader Frankie Wattleston) drags "Skipper O'Malley" (Mario Calvino), his "faithful but brilliant sidekick," into a series of hilarious misadventures. Read full book review >
PUPPY LOVE by Betsy Duffey
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 9-11)"
First in another formulaic series (``Pet Patrol'') aimed at middle-grade readers. Read full book review >
KLARA'S NEW WORLD by Jeanette Winter
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A concluding note sets it in the 1860's. (Picture book. 7-12)"
When a drought brings tough times to her Swedish family, Klara—not yet eight—fears she'll be hired out to work on the manor. Read full book review >
THE WITCH RETURNS by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"This last story contains a complex weave of flashbacks to the earlier books as well as new horrors: gratifying for old fans, an irresistible lure for new ones. (Fiction. 8-12)"
The sixth in a popular series brings an end to witchy Mrs. Tuggle after a yearlong struggle by Lynn Morley and her friend Mouse. Read full book review >
DO-OVER by Rachel Vail
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"As she did so skillfully in Wonder, Vail enriches an accessible story with sharply observed characters, especially a likable protagonist who confronts the complicated task of growing up with humor, intelligence, and good will. (Fiction. 11-15)"
The author of Wonder (1991) presents another perceptive story about kids in the same junior high. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >