ANIMIAL SOCIETIES by Karen Gravelle
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Brief glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Defining a ``society'' as individuals living together with defined rules and prescribed behaviors, Gravelle discusses several examples, especially wolves, sharks, dolphins, rats, ostriches, ants, and bees. Read full book review >
POWWOW by George Ancona
by George Ancona, photographed by George Ancona
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"A lively, positive portrayal of contemporary Native Americans. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
Capturing the flash and rhythm of Native American dances as performed during a ``pan-Indian'' Crow Fair in Montana, photographer Ancona is at his experienced best. Read full book review >

PROJECT WHEELS by Jacqueline Turner Banks
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not first-rate, but a readable, pleasant additional purchase. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Now that they're in sixth grade, Angela and her small-town Kentucky friends are discovering raging hormones that complicate their relationships, their party plans, and their class Christmas project. Read full book review >
A MOON IN YOUR LUNCH BOX by Michael Spooner
POETRY
Released: April 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Poetry. 6-12)"
Spooner's first book for young people is an appealing seasonal cycle, thematically linked by the moon—symbol of change and mystery and a rich source of other imagery. Read full book review >
IF IT HADN'T BEEN FOR YOON JUN by Marie G. Lee
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1993

"Disappointing. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Though for a younger audience, Lee's second shares concerns about race with her fine debut, Finding My Voice (1992). Read full book review >

Released: April 1, 1993

"Still more stories are to come. (Fiction. 10-12)"
It seems only appropriate that death has not brought an end to Bellairs's career; and, happily, this posthumous collaboration has less of a thrown-together feel than his last few books. Read full book review >
MY FIRST MUSIC BOOK by Helen Drew
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Good ideas for teachers, scout leaders, camp counselors, and for home. (Nonfiction. 5-11)"
This large, attractive British import should have been titled My First Book of Musical Instruments: bright color photos and step- by-step instructions show how to make and play a dozen types (heavy on percussion), from simple rattles to a fairly elaborate facsimile of a banjo. Read full book review >
AMZAT AND HIS BROTHERS by Paula Fox
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not to be missed. (Folklore. 8-12)"
A fine novelist passes along three stories told by Floriano Vecchi, born near Bologna (who heard them from his grandfather, b. 1850, who got them from his), explaining that these tales survive—with changes and additions in each generation—though Florian's village was destroyed in WW II. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: March 31, 1993

"Useful, perhaps, but simplistic. (Fiction. 10-13)"
When David, 11, hears one of his parents voicing the title's question during a bitter discussion of their separate vacation plans, he's understandably hurt at being considered little more than an inconvenience. Read full book review >
OUTSIDE AND INSIDE TREES by Sandra Markle
NATURE
Released: March 31, 1993

A prolific science writer takes on bark, roots, pollen, and the other parts of trees, all depicted in striking color photos; the color-enhanced, carefully labeled microscopic photos (showing the inside of a seed, stoma, sapwood tubes, and more) are especially fascinating. Read full book review >
STINKER'S RETURN by Pamela F. Service
ANIMALS
Released: March 31, 1993

"For active sf collections. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Tsynq Yr (Stinker) was last seen leaving earth in a space shuttle stolen with the help of friends Karen and Jonathan (Stinker from Space, 1988); the little alien had been forced to take the form of a skunk when he crashed on Earth. Read full book review >
ALWAYS, JULIA by Marcia Wood
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 31, 1993

"Still, though some of the early implications are left unexplored, the emotional truths are beautifully underplayed, leaving readers the wrenching task of contrasting Julia's enthusiastic missives with her trail of heartbreak. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Leaving behind her admiring younger sister Jane (15), Julia moves to New York to become a writer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Libba Bray
author of LAIR OF DREAMS
August 25, 2015

In Lair of Dreams, the second installment of Libba Bray’s bestselling young adult Diviners series, after a supernatural showdown with a serial killer, Evie O'Neill has outed herself as a Diviner. Now that the world knows of her ability to "read" objects, and therefore, read the past, she has become a media darling, earning the title "America's Sweetheart Seer." But not everyone is so accepting of the Diviners' abilities....Meanwhile, mysterious deaths have been turning up in the city, victims of an unknown sleeping sickness. Can the Diviners descend into the dreamworld and catch a killer? “Weaving together a chilling mystery with a truly elusive solution, several poignant love stories, agonizing injustice, terrifyingly monstrous dreams, and even a cameo by legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung, this installment wraps enough up to satisfy but clearly sets the stage for more,” our reviewer writes in a rare starred review. “How will readers stand the wait?” View video >