FIRE OVER SWALLOWHAVEN by Allen Jones
Released: April 1, 2012

"Fast-moving quest fantasy with cool vocabulary and a quickly written vibe. (Animal steampunk. 7-10)"
Fighting pirates and waking a phoenix in a volcano are the two primary events in this third installment of a six-part outer-space animal-steampunk adventure. Read full book review >
THE NOT-SO-PERFECT PLANET by Pamela F. Service
Released: April 1, 2012

"The weak plot doesn't really bear up under its instructional load, but there's enough farce to keep the lessons well-greased. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
Caving to the demands of his pesky little sister Maggie, aspiring fictioneer Josh's second fantasy story features a world with mermaids and unicorns. Sort of. Read full book review >

13 HANGMEN by Art Corriveau
Released: April 1, 2012

"Ghostly fun in old Boston. (historical note) (Fantasy. 9-14)"
When Tony DiMarco's family moves from Ann Arbor, Mich., to Boston's North End, Tony finds himself in the middle of a mystery going back to the days of Paul Revere. Read full book review >
POISON MOST VIAL by Benedict Carey
Released: April 1, 2012

"Budding chemists and crime-scene investigators will especially enjoy this science whodunit. (Mystery. 10-14)"
When Ruby's janitor father becomes the prime suspect in a murder, the eighth grader decides it's up to her to clear his name. Read full book review >
FAKE MUSTACHE by Tom Angleberger
Released: April 1, 2012

"Total deadpan lunacy. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Can one nerdy teen keep a tuft of fake lip-hair from realizing its dream of world domination? Read full book review >

Released: April 1, 2012

"Admirable insight, despite being conveyed by a lad who comes across as more a super-precocious, psychologically astute preteen than a credible 9 year old. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Stewart fills in the back story on the narcoleptic genius founder of the Mysterious Benedict Society (2007), planting him amid fellow orphans in an old country mansion. Read full book review >
THE PRINCESS OF TRELIAN by Michelle Knudsen
Released: April 1, 2012

"Nonetheless, the likable characters and brisk narrative will undoubtedly lure readers into eagerly anticipating future installments. Next time, though—more Jakl, please! (Fantasy. 11-16)"
An engaging fantasy sequel marred by middle-book syndrome. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2012

"While possibly reaching for a bit of Lemony Snicket's basket of queasy joy, this falls very flat. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
A tale that starts badly and ends more or less well, with an underpinning of dubious philosophy and a shrill, "now I shall teach you" voice. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2012

"This handsome, information-rich, yet brief illustrated 'eco-journal' fills a gap—and more. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
This perky, kid-friendly introduction to worldwide "green" construction efforts also happens to be both well-informed and carefully designed for optimal engagement. Read full book review >
THE BIG GREEN BOOK OF THE BIG BLUE SEA by Helaine Becker
Released: April 1, 2012

"The sheer breadth of information presented here and its appealing format make this an invaluable resource, especially when accompanied by a knowledgeable adult to guide and correct. (table of contents, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Bite-sized pieces of information and hands-on explorations teach readers all about the sea, from its composition and currents to its problems and energy potential. Read full book review >
THE GIRL WHO OWNED A CITY by O. T. Nelson
Released: April 1, 2012

"Whether she merits it is a matter for discussion—but though this doesn't equal Jennifer Armstrong and Nancy Butcher's Fire-us series (not to mention Lord of the Flies) for credibility, the premise is a proven one for young audiences. (Graphic science fiction. 10-13)"
Just as ideologically unsettling—and patchwork—as ever, Nelson's 1975 post-apocalyptic tale gets a noir graphic adaptation. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2012

"More specific and extensive manuals and workbooks abound, but as a lucid guide to the disorder and its management, this has proven its worth over the past 20 years. (multilevel, multimedia resource lists) (Self-help. 9-12, adult)"
Minor revisions and new illustrations freshen up the third edition of an encouraging, if generalized, guide for young people with attention issues and their parents. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >