THE IMAGINARY by A.F. Harrold
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Wonderfully entertaining. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
What happens to the imaginary friends we make when we are so little we can't remember them later on? Read full book review >
FIRSTBORN by Tor Seidler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A rich tale of the wild that quickens the pulse and fills the heart. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
A magpie who befriends a wolf tells their story. Read full book review >

THE FORGOTTEN SISTERS by Shannon Hale
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A laudable conclusion to a popular series. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Miri, as spunky and smart as ever, returns in the final book of the award-winning Princess Academy trilogy. Read full book review >
EGG by Steve Jenkins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Appealing, accessible and accurate, this is another admirable creation. (additional reading) (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
With their characteristic design and choice of intriguing details, this prolific author-illustrator pair introduces "nature's perfect package": the egg. Read full book review >
STONE ANGEL by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"A different take on a difficult subject. (Picture book. 8-10)"
A young Jewish girl and her family must flee when the Nazis march into Paris. Read full book review >

THE BOY WHO LOST FAIRYLAND by Catherynne M. Valente
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Readers may wish the words were food, so they could eat them up. And they may keep reading this series for just as long as people have been arguing about Oz. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Why live in Kansas when you can stay in Oz? Valente may well have wondered at Dorothy's inexplicable decision. Read full book review >
WILLY MAYKIT IN SPACE by Greg Trine
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 3, 2015

"Readers new to chapter books and who like to laugh often will most likely find Willy's story peppered with just enough silly humor (monster poop!) to keep the pages turning. (Adventure. 7-10)"
Willy Maykit is not an ordinary kid. Read full book review >
DANCE OF THE BANISHED by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"An eye-opening exposé of historical outrages committed in two countries, with intriguing glimpses of a minority group that is not well-known in the Americas. (afterword) (Historical fiction. 11-14)"
World War I separates a betrothed Anatolian couple—leaving one to witness the Armenian genocide and sending the other to a prison camp…in Canada. Read full book review >
THE SPIRIT OF THE SEA by Rebecca Hainnu
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"A fresh, if not quite as seamless, alternative to Robert D. and Daniel San Souci's Song of Sedna (1981). (Picture book/folk tale. 7-9)"
A popular Inuit cautionary legend, featuring a haughty young woman and a gruesome climactic twist. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"A 'rad' alternative to less-inclusive albums, such as Cynthia Chin-Lee, Megan Halsey and Sean Addy's Amelia to Zora (2005). (websites) (Collective biography. 11-14)"
Rousing tributes to 26 women who didn't keep their heads or voices down. Read full book review >
RANDOM BODY PARTS by Leslie Bulion
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"Better suited to poetry classrooms than science labs. (Poetry. 9-12)"
Poetry + anatomy and physiology = an unusual combination. Read full book review >
THIS STRANGE WILDERNESS by Nancy Plain
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"A superb introduction to the life and times of a great American artist and naturalist. (appendix, glossary, source notes, bibliography, illustration credits, index) (Biography. 9-14)"
John James Audubon's 1838 masterpiece, The Birds of America, "marked the beginning of modern ornithology," and this volume dramatizes the life and times of the man who devoted his life to creating it.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >