NOISY BIRD SING-ALONG by John Himmelman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"For fostering nature awareness, this is a welcome companion to the author's previous titles about noisy bugs and noisy frogs. (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
A say-along, sing-along invitation introduces the art of birding by ear through simple, recognizable bird songs and sounds and, mostly, familiar birds. Read full book review >
BIG STAR OTTO by Bill Slavin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2015

"For devotees of Asterix and perhaps Tintin, but not for everyone. (Graphic fantasy. 8-12)"
Otto's in Hollywood, but he doesn't care about stardom; he wants his best friend, Georgie. Read full book review >

NEON ALIENS ATE MY HOMEWORK by Nick Cannon
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A collection well-suited to young boys of color as well as all young fans of hip-hop culture, who often long for family-friendly content. (Poetry. 7-10)"
What if Shel Silverstein grew up on hip-hop? Read full book review >
LES MISÉRABLES by Victor Hugo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"An epic muddle, all in all. (Graphic fiction. 10-13)"
In typically buoyant cartoons, Williams presents a précis of Hugo's epic. Read full book review >
MISSION TITANIC by Jude Watson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"More of the same. (Adventure. 10-12)"
A mysterious Outcast threatens to usurp Ian Kabra's place as the head of the world's most powerful family. Read full book review >

ECHO by Pam Muñoz Ryan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A grand narrative that examines the power of music to inspire beauty in a world overrun with fear and intolerance, it's worth every moment of readers' time. (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
A multilayered novel set in turbulent times explores music's healing power. Read full book review >
MY SECRET GUIDE TO PARIS by Lisa Schroeder
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Sweet but ultimately unsatisfying. (Fiction. 8-12)"
After the death of her beloved grandmother, a girl travels to Paris with her mother and finds solace and resolution. Read full book review >
MESMERIZED by Mara Rockliff
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Rockliff and Bruno's playful approach buoys solid science and history. (author's note, sources) (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
Ben Franklin's several years in France during the American Revolution included an occasion on which he consulted on a scientific matter for the French king. Read full book review >
OTTO THE OWL WHO LOVED POETRY by Vern Kousky
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Simple and clearly told, with a wonderfully engaging protagonist. (Picture book/poetry. 6-9)"
A poetically inclined owl learns to accept his calling. Read full book review >
AFTER THE BELL RINGS by Carol Diggory Shields
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Smart and sassy poems and accessible illustrations combine for an engaging, humorous package. (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)"
Twenty-two light poems and accompanying illustrations explore what happens after school. Read full book review >
HAS ANYONE SEEN JESSICA JENKINS? by Liz Kessler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Readers not yet ready for teen thrillers should warm to this unlikely band of new friends who solve this easy-to-read 'scientific' mystery with no adult intervention. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
Superhuman powers. The best thing ever—or a total nightmare? Read full book review >
MARK OF THE THIEF by Jennifer A. Nielsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"The fast-paced, ingenious plot, charismatic hero and highly diverse cast of characters—including the ancient, eternal city itself—make this series opener a captivating joy ride. (Historical fantasy. 10-14)"
Compelled by an ambitious general to retrieve an amulet from Julius Caesar's treasure, long hidden in a mine outside Rome, Nic—a slave with attitude—more than succeeds, upending his life and escalating conflict among the power brokers of imperial Rome. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >