TREE by Britta Teckentrup
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This unassuming story is an intergenerational delight. (Picture book. 3-10)"
Like the stealthy spider quietly spinning its web on a low bough, life around and on the apple tree is never static. Read full book review >
BRAMBLEHEART by Henry Cole
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Nestled in a small trim size, this is an appealing and accessible genre blend. (Fantasy. 6-10)"
A young chipmunk finds his path. Read full book review >

THE EXTINCTS by Veronica Cossanteli
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A mostly enjoyable British import that should be better than it is. (glossary) (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Animals—mythical and extinct—abound in George Drake's hometown, Squermington. Read full book review >
RAVENOUS by MarcyKate Connolly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A fantastical adventure fortified by its flawed heroine. (Fantasy. 8-14)"
Greta—one of the girls sold to Belladoma as fodder for the sea monster who threatens monthly floods in Monstrous (2015)—makes a dangerous deal with a witch to save her brother.Read full book review >
THE PAGES BETWEEN US by Lindsey Leavitt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Leavitt and Mellom's humorous and perceptive tale deftly explores the quandary of how to sustain a cherished friendship while nurturing individual growth. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Sixth-grade friends chronicle their transition to middle school in a shared journal. Read full book review >

SARA LOST AND FOUND by Virginia Castleman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Written from debut novelist Castleman's childhood experience of adoption from an orphanage, this title offers much fodder for discussion. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Placed in foster care, 10-year-old Sara wrestles with the meaning of family, loyalty, and love. Read full book review >
LOUISE TRAPEZE DID NOT LOSE THE JUGGLING CHICKENS by Micol Ostow
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Louise is a feisty gal with the best of intentions. She just 'accidentally a-little-bit' messes everything up. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Louise Trapeze is back (Louise Trapeze Is Totally 100% Fearless, 2015), longing to be more mature than ever.Read full book review >
LITTLE CAT'S LUCK by Marion Dane Bauer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Excellent for young readers and all cat lovers. (Verse fiction. 7-12)"
This little cat's luck turns out to be dependent on the kindness of strangers, and that, most satisfyingly, connects back to her own unerring kindness. Read full book review >
THE MAGE OF TRELIAN by Michelle Knudsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A solid, satisfying genre performance; it may not invent any new tricks, but it executes each component in a grand fashion. (Fantasy. 11-16)"
An exemplary middle-grade fantasy trilogy concludes with a blast. Lots of blasts. Read full book review >
WHAT ARE YOU GLAD ABOUT? WHAT ARE YOU MAD ABOUT? by Judith Viorst
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An unusually mixed bag. (Poetry. 6-10)"
The title of Viorst's latest collection of poetry for children provides an open invitation for readers not only to ponder feelings in general, but to examine their reactions to the assembled poems as well. Read full book review >
MABEL JONES AND THE FORBIDDEN CITY by Will Mabbitt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"If this is the future, count child fans in. (Adventure. 8-11)"
Crepuscular carnivores! Hypnotized egrets! Amputated bottoms! The pajama-clad child pirate Mabel Jones is back for her latest adventure. Read full book review >
FENWAY AND HATTIE by Victoria J. Coe
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Young dog lovers will enjoy Fenway's point of view, even if his eagerness wears a bit thin. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Fenway, a young, exuberant Jack Russell terrier, is having lots of trouble getting his "short human," Hattie, to behave. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >