TOO MANY CARROTS by Katy Hudson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Superficially appealing; much less so upon closer examination. (Picture book. 6-8)"
When Rabbit's unbridled mania for collecting carrots leaves him unable to sleep in his cozy burrow, other animals offer to put him up. Read full book review >
MIDNIGHT MADNESS AT THE ZOO by Sherryn Craig
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 10, 2016

"It may not be great literature, but it's a valuable STEM and Common Core tool. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Math, basketball, and a trip to the zoo. Read full book review >

IT'S NOT EASY BEING NUMBER THREE by Drew Dernavich
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An acclaimed cartoonist in the adult world has created a solid hit for children. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When Number Three feels bored with being a number, he seeks other uses for his highly distinguishable shape. Read full book review >
BRAMBLEHEART by Henry Cole
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Nestled in a small trim size, this is an appealing and accessible genre blend. (Fantasy. 6-10)"
A young chipmunk finds his path. Read full book review >
I'M NOT HATCHING by Laura Gehl
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Delightful and right on target. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Egg will not hatch in spite of all the fun things he could do with Peep. What will it take to get him to hatch? Read full book review >

LITTLE CAT'S LUCK by Marion Dane Bauer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Excellent for young readers and all cat lovers. (Verse fiction. 7-12)"
This little cat's luck turns out to be dependent on the kindness of strangers, and that, most satisfyingly, connects back to her own unerring kindness. Read full book review >
MY DOG'S A CHICKEN by Susan McElroy Montanari
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"While pet tales abound, this lively look at making the best of a bad situation highlights humor and encourages creativity, enriching the somewhat predictable plot. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A young girl finds an imaginative way to satisfy her desire for a pet dog despite her parents' objections. Read full book review >
THE MAGE OF TRELIAN by Michelle Knudsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A solid, satisfying genre performance; it may not invent any new tricks, but it executes each component in a grand fashion. (Fantasy. 11-16)"
An exemplary middle-grade fantasy trilogy concludes with a blast. Lots of blasts. Read full book review >
HOW TO PUT YOUR PARENTS TO BED by Mylisa Larsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This bedtime book is good for some laughs—even though it feels a bit tired. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Role reversal finds a little girl trying to put her parents to bed. Read full book review >
WHAT ARE YOU GLAD ABOUT? WHAT ARE YOU MAD ABOUT? by Judith Viorst
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An unusually mixed bag. (Poetry. 6-10)"
The title of Viorst's latest collection of poetry for children provides an open invitation for readers not only to ponder feelings in general, but to examine their reactions to the assembled poems as well. Read full book review >
BLOOM by Doreen Cronin
by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by David Small
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"If youngsters scratch their heads, take them to the yard or community garden to plant and make mud pies. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Cronin and Small combine talents in this fable for modern times: people who live in fragile kingdoms may need to get their hands dirty rebuilding. Read full book review >
SARA LOST AND FOUND by Virginia Castleman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Written from debut novelist Castleman's childhood experience of adoption from an orphanage, this title offers much fodder for discussion. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Placed in foster care, 10-year-old Sara wrestles with the meaning of family, loyalty, and love. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >