KILL SHOT by Bill Bunn
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 6, 2015

"A thrown-together mishmash of fragmentary plot ideas, arbitrary events and discordant themes. (Thriller. 11-13)"
The discovery of a sunken World War II submarine plunges a rootless Labrador teen into a whirl of weird revelations and deadly danger. Read full book review >
THE BLACK RECKONING by John Stephens
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"This fantasy trilogy closes with both satisfying finality and the realistic, requisite heartbreak that comes with saying goodbye. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Kids grow up so quickly these days—at least they do when they are prophetically linked to magical relics. Read full book review >

THE GRASSHOPPER & THE ANTS by Jerry Pinkney
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"From an unparalleled artist, another brilliant work. (Picture book/folk tale. 3-6)"
Caldecott Medalist Pinkney returns to Aesop, recasting the familiar fable as a meditation on the importance of sustaining both body and soul. Read full book review >
THE ABC ANIMAL ORCHESTRA by Donald Saaf
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Preschoolers may not know all of the creatures (aardvark, kiwi, ibex), but they will have fun pointing out what's happening and connecting letters with them. Isn't that what alphabet books are supposed to do? (Picture book. 2-4)"
The title says it all—kind of. Read full book review >
BEN DRAWS TROUBLE by Matt Davies
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Funny and exuberantly sweet. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Ben Lukin, the bike-loving boy from Ben Rides On (2013), loses something of special significance: his sketchbook.Read full book review >

EVERYBODY SLEEPS (BUT NOT FRED) by Josh Schneider
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Ingenious. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Master staller Fred meets his match (poetry!) in this hilarious not-yet-ready-for-bed tale. Read full book review >
MABEL AND ME  by Mark Sperring
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A pretty package but lacking in substance and storyline. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A small mouse with delusions of grandeur strolls down a vaguely Parisian street with his best friend, Mabel. Read full book review >
WILD ABOUT US! by Karen Beaumont
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A gleeful look at self-acceptance (and don't forget to search for the hidden fly). (Picture book. 4-8)"
Various zoo animals celebrate their favorite features, warts and all. Read full book review >
STICK AND STONE by Beth Ferry
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A light, enjoyable approach to a recognizable narrative about making—and helping—friends. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A lonely tree branch and rock find friendship and strength together. Read full book review >
LOOK! by Jeff Mack
by Jeff Mack, illustrated by Jeff Mack
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Look, indeed! An energetic invitation to the joys of books. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Even an ape knows books can be better than TV. Read full book review >
THE YEAR OF THE THREE SISTERS by Andrea Cheng
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"This unique sisterhood beats with a gentle heart. (pronunciation guide) (Fiction. 8-10)"
In this fourth novel of the Anna Wang series, seventh-grader Anna can hardly believe her waitress friend from China is coming to America. Read full book review >
NELSON MANDELA by Beatrice Gormley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A complete, informative introduction to a nonviolent revolutionary and one of history's most important champions of human rights. (photos, timeline, glossary, source notes) (Biography. 10-14)"
A young troublemaker grows up to be a civil rights activist, president of his country and world leader in this overview of the life and work of the Nobel Prize-winning peacemaker. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >