TOO MANY CARROTS by Katy Hudson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Superficially appealing; much less so upon closer examination. (Picture book. 6-8)"
When Rabbit's unbridled mania for collecting carrots leaves him unable to sleep in his cozy burrow, other animals offer to put him up. Read full book review >
PRESIDENT LINCOLN by Demi
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 12, 2016

"A picture-book portrait that's beautiful as well as admiring. (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
With a jewel cutter's precision of image and a like economy of language, Demi tells the story of the 16th U.S. president. Read full book review >

THE LITTLE TREE THAT WOULD NOT SHARE by Nicoletta Costa
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A smart story of good news leading to grace. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little tree is protectively proprietary about his leaves until late autumn surprises him. Read full book review >
PLACE VALUE by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"When paired with adult guidance, a 'valuable' look at place value. (Math picture book. 5-8)"
Adler tackles yet another difficult math concept using simple language and an excellent comparison. Read full book review >
RUN FOR YOUR LIFE! by Lola M. Schaefer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"More whimsy than fact here—but by that measure, an agreeable-enough romp. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Following Swamp Chomp (2014), Schaefer and Meisel explore animals in motion on the African savanna.Read full book review >

GRANDPA LOVES YOU! by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A beloved grandparent gift purchase to be sure but also a toddler-friendly inclusion to an intergenerational storytime. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A grandfather rabbit celebrates the birth of a new baby bunny and recounts the many adventures they will have. Read full book review >
A HOLE IN THE WALL by Hans Wilhelm
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A deceptively subtle thought-provoker for preschoolers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Four round and rubbery cartoon African animals—a wild dog, a warthog, a lion, and an elephant—find what seems to be a hole in the wall. Read full book review >
HERE IS BIG BUNNY by Steve Henry
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"Big fun for new readers who are ready to turn their Where's Waldo skills to finding text. (Early reader. 5-7)"
It's a bird, it's a plane, it's Big Bunny! Read full book review >
LOOKING FOR BONGO by Eric Velasquez
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"Darling. (glossary) (Picture book. 2-5)"
A little boy searches for his lost toy. Read full book review >
GRANDMA IS A SLOWPOKE by Janet Halfmann
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A sweet celebration of intergenerational slowpokery. (Picture book. 3-8)"
An unnamed little girl likes to go on long walks across the countryside with her grandmother…but Grandma, who walks with a cane, is a slowpoke. Read full book review >
SOMETIMES YOU WIN—SOMETIMES YOU LEARN by John C. Maxwell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"While Maxwell's advice about winning is pretty general, his message to turn failures into opportunities to learn is a good one; here's hoping kids hear it in Wendy and Wade's tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
"Try your best"; "Winning isn't everything"; "There's no I in teamwork"; "Be a good sport"—these are not the lessons that Maxwell presents here. Instead, he lays out a loose framework for how to win and, when that fails, how to turn losses into learning experiences. Read full book review >
OOPS, POUNCE, QUICK, RUN! by Mike Twohy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Give this 'alphabet caper' an F for Fun. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Leave it to a cartoonist (in this case, a regular contributor to the New Yorker) to cleverly create a picture book-length comic strip out of the alphabet.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >