ON THE FARM by Kate Riggs
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"A fine board-book addition to an already full field of farmyard books. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
Cheerful yet realistic-looking farm animals introduce toddlers to farm-animal sounds and environs. Read full book review >
TIME TO BUILD by Kate Riggs
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"This sturdy introduction to some basic construction equipment also highlights the value of cooperation, giving it wide appeal. (Board book. 2-4)"
A simple introduction to the functions of some basic tools: tape measure, saw, wrench, drill, screwdriver, and hammer. Read full book review >

TRASH TALK by Michelle Mulder
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Enclosed in these pages is plenty of food for thought and examples for direct action. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
To dumpster dive, to glean, perchance to dream of a zero-waste world. Read full book review >
SHABBAT SHALOM, HEY! by Ann D. Koffsky
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Charming and joyous but not for the uninitiated. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Preparing for the Friday night Shabbat ceremony and meal is a joyous expression of faith and tradition. Read full book review >
RUBY WIZARDRY by Eric Weinstein
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"An enjoyable book that can turn any kid (or adult!) into a programming wizard. (index) (Nonfiction/fantasy. 10 & up)"
An introductory programming guide is structured around a whimsical original fairy tale in a land run on the Ruby programming language. Read full book review >

LAUREN IPSUM by Carlos Bueno
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Positive, smart, empowering philosophies and thinking skills couched in a wacky adventure. (Fantasy/philosophy. 8-14)"
A lost girl travels through a fantastical Alice in Wonderland-esque world filled with The Phantom Tollbooth-like computer-programming metaphors.Read full book review >
THE LEGEND OF THE BEAVER'S TAIL by Stephanie Shaw
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"An easily digestible fable with a simple moral and added classroom value as a natural science add-on. (Picture book/folk tale. 6-8)"
Shaw puts an ecological spin on an Ojibwa fable about pride and its consequences. Read full book review >
THE FLYING HAND OF MARCO B. by Richard Leiter
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Little listeners will be hoping their hands will take flight on their next road trips. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Just how high can a wayward hand fly? Read full book review >
BUSTER THE LITTLE GARBAGE TRUCK by Marcia Berneger
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Bibliotherapy for timid children obsessed with vehicles. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Buster's got a big problem: He's not big enough. Read full book review >
SWEET DREAMS, WILD ANIMALS! by Eileen R. Meyer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Slumber and science in harmonious combination, equally suitable for bedtime reading or for sharing with wakeful groups. (Informational picture book. 5-7)"
A cozy combination of restful rhymes, natural history notes and close-up pictures of snoozing creatures. Read full book review >
THE DAY THE SUN DID NOT RISE AND SHINE by Mirjam Enzerink
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"This Dutch import offers a sweet and funny twist on the bedtime book. (Picture book. 4-7) "
Will the morning never come? Read full book review >
THE FIRST CASE by Ulf Nilsson
Kirkus Star
by Ulf Nilsson, illustrated by Gitte Spee, translated by Julia Marshall
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"The only sadness is that Volume 2 isn't immediately available. (Mystery. 4-10)"
Who are the scurvy thieves loose in the woodland district? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >