BLACKBIRD FLY by Erin Entrada Kelly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Children's literature has been waiting for Apple Yengko—a strong, Asian-American girl whose ethnic identity simultaneously complicates and enriches her life. (Fiction. 9-14)"
Apple Yengko has one possession from the Philippines—a Beatles cassette tape with her father's name written on it. She knows every song by heart. Read full book review >
THE PENDERWICKS IN SPRING by Jeanne Birdsall
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Not without some flaws, but overall, another charmer that will generate smiles, tears and fuzzy feelings. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A new and darker installment in the acclaimed series about the loving and bustling family. Read full book review >

ASTROTWINS—PROJECT BLASTOFF by Mark Kelly
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Intriguing subject matter and rock-solid pacing combine for a nifty adventure—one that may well spark a new generation of astronauts. (further reading) (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
With co-author Freeman, Kelly takes readers back to 1975, when long-distance telephone calls cost money, calculators were expensive luxuries, and Americans fizzed with excitement about the U.S. space program. Read full book review >
HEATHER HAS TWO MOMMIES by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Welcome back to Heather and her mommies. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Heather has two mommiesand a new look!Read full book review >
FUNNY FACE, SUNNY FACE by Sally Symes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A simple, lively rhyme describing a toddler's day, with warm, joyful images that tykes and their caregivers will happily embrace. (Picture book. 1-3)"
What are we going to do today? Read full book review >

MIGLOO'S DAY by William Bee
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Whew. There's definitely a new 'Busytown' in town. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Doing Richard Scarry considerably more than one better, a peripatetic beagle sails through teeming cartoon seek-and-find scenes featuring over 65 named characters. Read full book review >
HIDE AND SEEK HARRY AT THE PLAYGROUND by Kenny Harrison
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"A brightly lit 'find it' game that focuses more on laughs than skill. (Board book. 2-3)"
Harry the hippo plays hide-and-seek. Read full book review >
MAISY'S TRACTOR by Lucy Cousins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Well done, Maisy! Keep up the good work. (Board book. 6 mos.-3)"
Hop on the tractor for a busy day on the farm with the unflappable Maisy. Read full book review >
ONCE UPON A CLOUD by Claire Keane
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Guaranteed to appeal to fans of Frozen and other princess tales. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Celeste ponders the perfect gift for her mother all day until bedtime, when "the Wind bl[ows] in and carrie[s] her away." Read full book review >
HOW TO SURPRISE A DAD by Jean Reagan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"It's an obvious choice for Father's Day, with year-round surprise applicability. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The successful team behind How to Babysit a Grandma (2014) returns to create a quick how-to title for those wanting to seriously surprise their father. Read full book review >
MOM SCHOOL by Rebecca Van Slyke
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Stories glorifying mothers abound; this well-intentioned but rather bland one does not distinguish itself. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An imaginative, ponytailed girl compares what she learns at school to what she believes her mother learned at Mom School. Read full book review >
ASTONISHING ANIMALS by Anita Ganeri
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Equally suitable for shared or solitary reading and hard to resist either way. (Pop-up nonfiction. 7-9)"
A cranked-up collection of animal facts bookended by big, startling pop-ups of toothy ocean predators. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >