PROJECT ALPHA by D.J. MacHale
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"This book may teach readers to distrust the government, but the real fear is that they'll put the novel down halfway through out of boredom. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
This series opener has the potential to turn its young readers positively cynical. Read full book review >
B IS FOR BEDTIME by Margaret Hamilton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"There are plenty of other bedtime stories that do not offer this potential confusion; seek them out for nighttime and save this for a brainteaser. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Babies and bedtime go hand in hand. Add an alphabet with cuddly illustrations on sturdy pages, and you have a book ready-made for lap sharing. Read full book review >

PETE MAKES A MISTAKE by Emily Arnold McCully
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A mistake to celebrate. (Early reader. 5-7)"
Pete's invitation mishap nearly ruins Rose Pig's party, but he corrects his mistake just in time. Read full book review >
THE PROBLEM WITH NOT BEING SCARED OF KIDS by Dan Richards
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"These cuddly monsters may be a little clichéd, but they get the narrative job done. Maybe they're just that persistent. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A group of not-very-scary monsters tries very hard to make friends with kids, which is exactly as problematic as one might expect. Read full book review >
NO MORE CUDDLES! by Jane Chapman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A fully rounded, easily associative, and visually inviting story. (Picture book. 3-7)"
As everybody knows, a bigfoot likes his privacy, even if he is built to cuddle: snuggly, soft, and silky (at least those bigfeet like Barry, who evidently knows about bathing). Read full book review >

MADAME MARTINE BREAKS THE RULES by Sarah S. Brannen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Lovely to look at but inartfully told. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Following his adoption in Madame Martine (2014), Max the dog leads his owner on another chase—this time in the Louvre. Read full book review >
THE HUNTER'S PROMISE by Joseph Bruchac
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Bruchac and Farnsworth honor the Indians of the Northeast, the written versions of the tale, and the elders and Wabanaki tellers who keep this story alive. (author's note) (Picture book/folk tale. 6-8)"
An Abenaki retelling of a traditional story of various indigenous nations of the Northeast that centers on loyalty and humans' relation to nature. Read full book review >
LITTLE ROBOT by Ben Hatke
Kirkus Star
by Ben Hatke, illustrated by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Girl power at its best. A sure winner! (Graphic novel. 3-12)"
Possibilities abound for a small, brown-skinned girl with time, a tool belt, and a penchant for urban adventure. Read full book review >
THE FLINKWATER FACTOR by Pete Hautman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Fast, funny episodes featuring creative takes on close-to-reality science. (Science fiction. 8-14)"
Hautman's latest features wacky adventures in a near-future small town packed with engineers. Read full book review >
THE DRAGONSITTER by Josh Lacey
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Except for the chocolate cure, it's much like trying to care for an oversized cat…that, OK, breathes fire. (Farce. 7-9)"
Caring for a traveling relative's pet isn't usually quite so…fraught. Read full book review >
TULIP AND REX WRITE A STORY by Alyssa Satin Capucilli
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"This sweet story makes a good springboard for vocabulary-enrichment activities in and out of the classroom. (Picture book. 3-7)"
With the help of her beloved dog, a girl composes a story on a word-filled jaunt to the park. Read full book review >
THE DAWN OF PLANET EARTH by Matthew Rake
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Chewy fare for fans of polysyllabic monikers but not a top-shelf prospect in the struggle to survive. (Nonfiction. 7-9)"
A chatty lungfish leads a quick tour of life's evolution, from Earth's formation to the appearance of early mammals in the Triassic Period. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >