What On Earth Can We Do? by Emily Sper
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 15, 2016

"A concise but thorough environmental primer for young readers enhanced by colorful and attractive illustrations."
A children's book renders a practical environmentalist message in simple language and pictures. Read full book review >
THE SOCCER BOOK by Andrea Mills
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 15, 2016

"Random, with the occasional fact as undeniably flabbergasting as, well, soccer-ball-sized hail. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
A grab bag of soccer tidbits, gathered like so many acorns by Mills. Read full book review >

WHAT COULD IT BE? by Sally Fawcett
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 14, 2016

"Quibbles aside, this is an easy-to-interpret interactive addition for the concept shelf. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Geometric shapes surround us. With a little imagination, children can recognize and identify them in the various objects they encounter in their daily lives. Read full book review >
REX by Simon James
by Simon James, illustrated by Simon James
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"A cozy bit of new-family making—perhaps better not taken too literally. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Single parenting, T. Rex style. Read full book review >
ROOKIE OF THE YEAR by Phil Bildner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"An engaging, feel-good novel about elementary school life. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Following series opener A Whole New Ballgame (2015), this second installment of the Rip and Red series finds the eponymous fifth-graders feeling pretty good about the year…until a new girl turns their world upside down. Read full book review >

THE TREASURE OF MARIA MAMOUN by Michelle Chalfoun
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"The plot mechanics may not hold up to scrutiny, but the puzzles are clever, and Maria's adventures are genuinely thrilling; that sort of storytelling never gets old. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's hard to explain why this book feels quite as old-fashioned as it does. Read full book review >
YOUR PRESIDENTIAL FANTASY DREAM TEAM by Daniel O'Brien
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"These portraits, while mightily jaundiced by the author's selectivity and perspective, do offer readers a warts-and-all look at two centuries of presidential leadership and politics. (further reading, websites, bibliography, source notes) (Collective biography. 10-13)"
Borrowing the "dream team" trope from superhero comics, O'Brien invites readers to evaluate each of 39 dead presidents (George Washington through Ronald Reagan, excepting Jimmy Carter) on his merits. Read full book review >
BELLA UP, UP, AND AWAY by Ryan O'Rourke
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"A delightful nautical and aerial feline caper. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When her new pal accidentally drifts out to sea, a spunky cat attempts a daring rescue. Read full book review >
SING WITH ME! by Naoko  Stoop
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"Plenty of opportunity for adult-baby interaction and early-literacy singing skills. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Thirteen nursery songs, with hand motions included, to share with young ones. Read full book review >
TEDDYCATS by Mike Storey
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"Intriguing if somewhat formulaic. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
When one young Teddycat's selfish decision exposes his whole rain forest community, he risks everything to save those he loves. Read full book review >
THE CRIMSON SKEW by S.E. Grove
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"A triumphant conclusion to a prodigious feat of storytelling. (Fantasy. 10 & up)"
The Mapmakers trilogy concludes with Sophia Tims still searching for her missing parents and, while she's at it, trying to prevent a cataclysmic war. Read full book review >
MAGGI AND MILO MAKE NEW FRIENDS by Juli Brenning
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"Perhaps next time Maggi and Milo will learn about the golden rule. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In their second outing, Maggi and her huge dog, Milo, visit a park where they make three new friends. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >