BAD LUCK by Pseudonymous Bosch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"For readers who like (or at least don't mind) continual authorial asides, a sturdy middle volume. ('backmatter'; map and illustrations, not seen) (Fantasy. 12-14)"
Still struggling to keep up with his wizardly fellow campers, Clay finally discovers his particular talent when the arrival of a large cruise ship touches off a round of assaults and rescues on remote Price Island. Read full book review >
THE EXTINCTS by Veronica Cossanteli
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"A mostly enjoyable British import that should be better than it is. (glossary) (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Animals—mythical and extinct—abound in George Drake's hometown, Squermington. Read full book review >

A BIG SURPRISE FOR LITTLE CARD by Charise Mericle Harper
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Check it out! (Picture book. 3-7)"
What will Little Card be? Read full book review >
WHEN SPRING COMES by Kevin Henkes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Henkes and Dronzek make waiting almost as much fun—if not more so—than the payoff. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Caldecott Medalist and Newbery honoree Henkes hands over the paintbrush for this ode to spring. Read full book review >
THE PAGES BETWEEN US by Lindsey Leavitt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Leavitt and Mellom's humorous and perceptive tale deftly explores the quandary of how to sustain a cherished friendship while nurturing individual growth. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Sixth-grade friends chronicle their transition to middle school in a shared journal. Read full book review >

WHOOPS! by Suzi Moore
by Suzi Moore, illustrated by Russell Ayto
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Full of fun and sure to evoke giggles, meows, bowwows, and squeaks. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Whoever heard of a cat that can't meow? Read full book review >
LIVING FOSSILS by Caroline Arnold
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"School and public libraries whose copies of James Martin's Living Fossils (1997) have worn out will welcome this inviting new look at a popular subject, as will kids with an interest in paleontology and evolution. (timeline, glossary, resources) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Six creatures whose essential appearances haven't changed in millions of years provide an introduction to the idea of "living fossils." Read full book review >
DUCK, DUCK, DINOSAUR by Kallie George
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Ultimately, with differences at least temporarily forgotten, everyone here is, as Spike puts it, 'HAPPY!' (Picture book. 3-5)"
Sibling competition is muffled beneath the wings of loving Mama Duck in this oblique pondside parable. Read full book review >
DEEP ROOTS by Nikki Tate
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Still, a solid foundation, a taproot to appreciating the incredible diversity and contribution of trees to our everyday lives. (resources, glossary index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A rangy introduction to trees and how they sustain our very existence. Read full book review >
LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE by Helaine Becker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"With a smart balance of humor and heart, this is a winning sequel. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Dirk Daring, Secret Agent (2014) returns for another spy romp. Read full book review >
LITTLE BUTTERFLY by Laura Logan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"Avoid this confusing fantasy and instead seek out one of the many excellent books that directly discuss the monarch's amazing journey. (Picture book. 4-7)"
When her cat injures the wing of a monarch butterfly at the opening of this wordless story, the blonde little white girl is delighted to discover that the creature can still fly. Read full book review >
TREE by Britta Teckentrup
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This unassuming story is an intergenerational delight. (Picture book. 3-10)"
Like the stealthy spider quietly spinning its web on a low bough, life around and on the apple tree is never static. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >